Reload Phase II...

Reload Phase II...

This is a discussion on Reload Phase II... within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; My general reloading procedure (after case prep and priming) is to dispense a charge, weigh it on a beam balance and adjust if needed, transfer ...

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Thread: Reload Phase II...

  1. #1
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    Reload Phase II...

    My general reloading procedure (after case prep and priming) is to dispense a charge, weigh it on a beam balance and adjust if needed, transfer the precise charge to the case and do it again until all cases are loaded. The next step is to seat a bullet and measure the seating depth - of EVERY bullet. Adjust if not within +/-0.001", although sometimes I let a +/-0.0015" by.

    Currently I have 40 rounds loaded using the above method. This set is for a specific test to see if the ES tops out and if so, how many rounds does it take to reach the max ES.

    Clearly the above process involves two things, one, very precise loading, but two, it's tedious and time consuming. This morning (after case prep and priming) I dropped the powder baffle into my RCBS Uniflow (small) and filled it with powder. I measured the first throw in my beam balance and it was right on - I had set it before when I was first playing around with it. It took me two minutes to charge 20 cases. I would have gotten probably two done in the precise method described above.

    I seated 20 bullets in the cases without measuring the depth on any of them. That took 3.5 minutes. So in about 6 minutes I charged 20 cases and seated 20 bullets and it was actually fun! And, that's a LOT faster than the precise method, but...

    I now have to shoot the 40 precisely loaded rounds as a baseline and compare the fast loaded to the precise loaded. Hope to shoot the 20 this morning and the 40 this afternoon.
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    And now, I'm off to shoot the 20! yahoo!
    We don't have a gun problem in the US, We have a people problem.
    The problem we have is people that want to kill large numbers innocent people
    in Gun Free Zones.

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    Are you measuring seating depth by the case base to ogive?

    I haven't resorted to that (yet) and still rely on overall length, which I know can be inconsistent by a few thousandths even with the best press/die combo. I also base my touch-the-lands bullet lengths on COL because of the manner by which I measure it. Sometimes that exceeds allowable magazine length, sometimes not. Once I set my seating die for a particular length, I'll usually measure only about each fifth round or so.

    Depending on the powder used, some I have to weigh each drop and trickle as needed, while finer ones, like ball, I can about "set it and forget it," checking about every tenth drop.

    Overall, I find I spend far more time on case prep than stuffing powder and lead. That may be because I use a lot of range brass and once-fired military brass, and those need more primer pocket prep than off the shelf commercial cases.
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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Are you measuring seating depth by the case base to ogive?
    I do measure CBTO.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    ...I haven't resorted to that (yet) and still rely on overall length, which I know can be inconsistent by a few thousandths even with the best press/die combo. I also base my touch-the-lands bullet lengths on COL because of the manner by which I measure it. Sometimes that exceeds allowable magazine length, sometimes not. Once I set my seating die for a particular length, I'll usually measure only about each fifth round or so.
    With the proper caliber attachments, I think you'd find the CBTO measurement actually easier, or at least as easy, as the COAL.

    Not sure it makes much difference which you measure or even if you measure either one unless you're shooting pretty long range at MOA size targets.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    ...Depending on the powder used, some I have to weigh each drop and trickle as needed, while finer ones, like ball, I can about "set it and forget it," checking about every tenth drop.
    I'd like to get to the "set it and forget it," point myself. I shot the 20 that I loaded like that, and the results weren't bad. The accuracy was super, but I only shot at 50 yards. The ES was a bit high, but I need to analyze the data before I know for sure. My plan is to shoot the 40 precisely loaded rounds this afternoon and then I can compare the two.
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    The problem we have is people that want to kill large numbers innocent people
    in Gun Free Zones.

  6. #5
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    Sounds like a lot of fun. Also a lot of time, effort, and stress!

    I shoot 21 different calibers, including several obsolete/antique calibers not regularly available for 50 years or more. I reload for all of them, as I have been doing since 1972. I never load to maximums; enough is enough and if I need more I choose a "bigger gun".

    I go through 5000-plus rounds of handgun ammo every year, so I produce it in batches of 1000 at a time. Deprime, clean, and inspect all the brass (couple of hours, usually a pleasant evening at the bench). Flare and prime (couple hours). Then load the brass in 50-round loading blocks, charge and seat, check-weighing every 20 rounds or so, checking COL every 50 to detect any variations in the equipment or process. Voila! A few evenings produce another thousand, rather than sitting in front of the TV watching stupid programs.

    Two single-stage presses, 50 year old Ohaus 10-10 precision scale, good powder measure, case trimmer tool, lubri-sizer, couple dozen bullet molds. Simple enough as long as a few basic rules are diligently followed.

    Personally, I enjoy the reloading about as much as the shooting!
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    For the time being, I'll have to stick to COL as mag length is the limiting factor. Some of my rounds almost drag on the front of the mag and still have plenty of "jump." I use a cleaning rod and whatever bullet I'm using to determine the land-engagement COL. It makes it a bit simpler not having to use different lengths for bullet seating.

    I accept some COL variance due to battered lead tips and other imperfections. It doesn't vary more than a couple .001s in general. For my purposes, that is negligible.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    For the time being, I'll have to stick to COL as mag length is the limiting factor. Some of my rounds almost drag on the front of the mag and still have plenty of "jump." I use a cleaning rod and whatever bullet I'm using to determine the land-engagement COL. It makes it a bit simpler not having to use different lengths for bullet seating.

    I accept some COL variance due to battered lead tips and other imperfections. It doesn't vary more than a couple .001s in general. For my purposes, that is negligible.
    I left something out of my previous reply, so... I DO use the COAL, because I have the same limit due to the magazine dim. I typically measure the COAL, and then set the CBTO from that round. All others get set to that CBTO.

    And yeah, that small COAL variation is insignificant for our purposes.
    We don't have a gun problem in the US, We have a people problem.
    The problem we have is people that want to kill large numbers innocent people
    in Gun Free Zones.

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    I don't know what mags you're using, but ASC stainless steel mags allow for a longer COL than Magpul and the rest. They are available in 5 and 10 round capacities also, which is kind of nice for bench work.

    I can get a COL of 2.295 in the ASC mag, 2.249 in my Magpul. .050" COL can make a difference.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I don't know what mags you're using, but ASC stainless steel mags allow for a longer COL than Magpul and the rest. They are available in 5 and 10 round capacities also, which is kind of nice for bench work.

    I can get a COL of 2.295 in the ASC mag, 2.249 in my Magpul. .050" COL can make a difference.
    Very good to know!
    We don't have a gun problem in the US, We have a people problem.
    The problem we have is people that want to kill large numbers innocent people
    in Gun Free Zones.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tangle View Post
    Very good to know!
    The .223s fit fine in the 5-round mags. The Mongoose rounds, being slightly less tapered, get a bit snug with the fifth round, so I generally use the 10-round mag with them, which is the same size as the 5-rounder.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
    Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your life it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

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