New "Walking Varminter" (M7 REM)

New "Walking Varminter" (M7 REM)

This is a discussion on New "Walking Varminter" (M7 REM) within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I wanted to put together a "walking varmint rig" primarily for Coyote calling. Another primary use is for big-game hunting practice, so I wanted something ...

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Thread: New "Walking Varminter" (M7 REM)

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    New "Walking Varminter" (M7 REM)

    I wanted to put together a "walking varmint rig" primarily for Coyote calling. Another primary use is for big-game hunting practice, so I wanted something set up like my hunting rigs VS a classic varmint rifle. I have been using my 3Gun AR15 for coyotes, but am switching back to a bolt gun. I've put together a REM SS M7 in .223 in an HS stock with Timney trigger, with LW Talley low mounts. (basically mirrors my .260Rem M7). I had wanted to mount a Leupold VX3i 2.5-8-36X from their custom shop, but the shop is still closed and the VX3i 2.5-8x36 was on back-order. So I went with a VX3i 3.5-10x40 with CDS. Cost a couple ounces and an inch in length. Total weight loaded is 7lbs, 5 ounces.

    Last weekend I did barrel break-in and zero'd with a scratch load that I'd worked up for my AR15 using Varget, I simply increased the OAL to .020 off the lands of the M7. Then put 5 rds into .78" at 100 with the 1st shot a clean bore. 4rds were in .43". It even put 3 rds of my 62grn Hornady FMJ "3Gun" load sub-MOA while cleaning after each shot during break-in. Once the seasons over I'll work some real load development.

    Had it out this am shooting at 200 & 300. No issues staying on an 8" plate at 300 either prone off back-pack or sitting off sticks. Top of the bottom duplex gets me 305yds or I just click in 2.5MOA on the CDS. I think it's going to work out. New walking varminter:





    One of the best parts.....looks like the barrel break-in worked. I used a combination of Sweets, then JB Bore Paste. Before firing the 1st shot I ran several tight patches using JB. Then performed the cleaning after each shot for 10rds, then after each group for two 3 shot groups. Cleaned the gun today after 20rds using just Sweets and no copper after just 2 wet patches, no brushing.
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  2. #2
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    Definitely want something "lite". Nice "set up"! I see it's 365/yr. hunting on them. Looks like you need a furharvester license also, to sell the pelts. Are you doing that? Just obliging land owners by removal?
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  3. #3
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Pete,

    We're into the "removal" aspect, so just a reg hunt license. It is a good way to gain hunting ground as most folks grant permission for yotes, then you can maybe work your way up the food chain.
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    Sounds like a good idea. What bullet weight are you considering for a load for the rifle?

    Good ol Sweet's 7.62 and JB Bore Cleaner. Joins Hoppe's No. 9, RIG preservative grease, and Singer Sewing Machine Oil as staples on the bench here.
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  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Sounds like a good idea. What bullet weight are you considering for a load for the rifle?

    Good ol Sweet's 7.62 and JB Bore Cleaner. Joins Hoppe's No. 9, RIG preservative grease, and Singer Sewing Machine Oil as staples on the bench here.
    I went with the Nosler 55BT.

    Was planning on coming up with a yote load and a target load like I've done with several other rifles, then just figured screw it, I'll just use the same load for yotes and practice. I've had great luck accuracy wise with the 55BT in several rifles and haven't lost a coyote yet with it.
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    Nice rig. My walking coyote rig is a Tikka T3X in 22-250 in a McMillan stock with a Leupold Firedot Duplex VR in 3x9x40.
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    Good idea and great choice for bullet weight in my opinion.

    I've got a 55 grain load cooked up for both the AR 15 on hand as well as the .220 Swift. In the Swift, the load works great on deer. Never have shot a coyote with a .220 Swift though I've wanted to. They've all been taken with the .30-06, .300 Savage, a couple with .22 Magnum, one with the .38 Special, and most of them with 10 and 12 gauge shotguns.

    Your stalking rifle in .223 is plum cute!
    Chuck R. likes this.
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  9. #8
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Good idea and great choice for bullet weight in my opinion.

    I've got a 55 grain load cooked up for both the AR 15 on hand as well as the .220 Swift. In the Swift, the load works great on deer. Never have shot a coyote with a .220 Swift though I've wanted to. They've all been taken with the .30-06, .300 Savage, a couple with .22 Magnum, one with the .38 Special, and most of them with 10 and 12 gauge shotguns.

    Your stalking rifle in .223 is plum cute!
    One guy called it a "mini" REM Sendero. I think I'm going with either a Rem "Sendero, Youth Model" or a "Sendero for older guys that don't want to carry that much chit model"
    bmcgilvray likes this.
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    Whoo! Some of those bean field, Sendero, or varmint rifles are a handful.

    If we're perceptive or just fortunate to live that long we occasionally wise up in our old age.

    I once sat in a deer blind from before sun rise to about 9:00 that morning, then allowed myself to get carried away on a scouting trip for deer or what-have-you. Thought was to just walk over to a field then return to the camp ... instead to then cross a river to see what was on the other side ... then to go up on a plateau ... then to go to the back side of the plateau and look off into a valley. I was toting the long heavy barreled Ruger 77V .220 Swift outfitted with a big Burris 6X18 target scope, carrying it in my crooked left arm. Hadn't intended to walk so far. It was pretty tiresome by the end of the hike which took most of the middle of the day, but I didn't notice any particular elbow pain until next day or so.

    I think that was the occasion when I jumped a large, giant, enormous rocking chair rack of a buck at fairly close range. Would have been a dead easy going away shot and well worth taking if I'd had my favorite .30-06. As it was I was gaining experience using the .220 Swift for deer and I had grave reservations about shooting one from behind, not entirely trusting the .220 Swift for a stern-to-stem shot. So, I just let him go.

    As it is, I've yet to shoot a deer from behind, utilizing the "Texas heart shot."

    Took my left elbow nearly two years to get past being chronically sore after that one day and I was only in my mid-30s at the time. I still prefer heavy and long-barreled bolt-action rifles for most hunting purposes and for bench rest fun, but not gonna walk about with them any more after that experience.
    Chuck R. likes this.
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