Culture of Safety - Page 3

Culture of Safety

This is a discussion on Culture of Safety within the Featured Topics forums, part of the Welcome To DefensiveCarry.com category; The pistol on the bedside table, behind me, is a Glock 19 4th Gen. It is loaded, 15 rounds in the magazine, one in the ...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 31 to 41 of 41
Like Tree105Likes

Thread: Culture of Safety

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array Scouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Orlando Florida
    Posts
    1,225
    The pistol on the bedside table, behind me, is a Glock 19 4th Gen. It is loaded, 15 rounds in the magazine, one in the breach. It will sit there, till I am showered, and dressed. Then it will be holstered, under a shirt, till it heads back to that self same bedside table.

    I do not own Jeans, I wear 511 multi pocketed pants. At 81 years of age, I am kind of set in my ways.

    At one time, when I purchased my first pair of 511 pants, at the FBI Academy, visiting from Canada, all my shooting buddy's dressed that way. Now full circle, multi pocketed trousers, are more seen than ever before, in the USA, Canada, Europe. Not 511s, just multi pocketed pants.

    All my other firearms live in a Safe. I do not hand my G19 to anybody to peruse it, loaded, or unloaded.

    This firearm is head shot capable (Target wise) in my hands, out to 20 yards or so, I have hit big gongs at 100 yards. I am very aware of my surroundings, my job these days is looking after my Wife of 24 years (Second such endeavor) but in the 60s I worked part time (All Bouncers were part time) In Clubs in Liverpool UK.

    Those were the days when fists and feet flew! Living in Florida, nice people surround you nearly wherever you drive, or walk. And reference Gun Safety? My carry pistol fits tight in a Kydex holster, on my Frequent flier belt. Unless it is sitting on my bedside table.
    graydude, Okeechobee and Wolf357 like this.

  2. #32
    Sponsor
    Array DRM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Near Historic Williamsburg, Virginia
    Posts
    1,183

    Lightbulb

    This is pretty Good!

    "Think Street, Train Sport, Practice Art" - Chris Haueter, Gracie Jiu Jitsu Black Belt

    D.R. Middlebrooks - Pro Shooting Coach & Custom Gunsmith
    Tactical Shooting Academy & Custom Shop
    www.TacticalShooting.com

  3. #33
    Ex Member Array jferguso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    US
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by DRM View Post
    This is pretty Good!
    I'm only concerned with 6:57 to 7:03 in that video. I wouldn't take safety advice from this guy. Another example of why I wouldn't take gun safety advice from this guy is found here:



    He is hardly the authority on all things firearms.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    DefensiveCarry.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #34
    Ex Member Array 1911srule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,094
    Whether we're talking gun safety or safety in all respects. Being conscious of everything and exercising meticulous attention to detail is what gets it done. We have a society that "assumes" far too much in every aspect of life. Thus safety suffers. When I saw the title of the thread I couldn't help think of the Marine KC130 that went down yesterday. When I read the story, I couldn't help but wonder if everyone who maintained that bird did so with the same mindset that was drilled into us when I was in. Safety needs to always be number one priority or people can die needlessly.

  6. #35
    Distinguished Member Array zamboni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    North of the Line
    Posts
    1,388
    I deal with idiots doing idiot things with guns because they are idiots on a daily basis.

    I could tell you stories that would simply amaze you, let alone make the hair rise on the back of your neck, and make your skin crawl. Now I must admit that you’d also enjoy a giggle or two along the way.

    Like the time ah guy called me over because the bullets kept falling out of his “clip”, while he was trying to insert his magazine into his 9mm handgun’s mag-well.

    I said: well sir, you are trying to load just the projectile bullet-part of a 9mm cartridge into your magazine.

    So I showed him a 9mm cartridge, and took it apart and showed him all of the components there of, and demonstrated too him how they are all put together, turning them into what people’s understanding is of a bullet.

    Now in the defense of his ignorance, of him not fully understanding just what is truly going on here he said: well I told the guy ( at the big box store ) that I needed some 9mm bullets for my gun and this is what he gave me.

    So now not only do we have a truly novice firearms enthusiast here, BUT, we also have an idiot working behind the counter of a gun store ( or maybe he thinks he'z ah funny guy ), whom before just handing this customer a box of 9mm reloading projectile bullets, the guy behind the counter should of ….

    A) asked him what weight and style of bullet he would like to use for his 9mm reloads, and do you need any other reloading supplies like powder, primers, casings, or such?

    OR

    B) asked him what he was going to be using them for, target practice or SD, and went over some available options

    OR

    C) just sold him ah box ah 9mm WB ammo

    Then there was the time I informed a patron that it wasn't safe for him or those around him, for him to keep pointing his AR at the ground the way he was with his finger on the trigger, and to please keep it pointed in a safe direction down range. After the third warning he flashed his LEO badge and said; don't worry I'm a firearms instructor and I train LEO's and I know what I'm doing.

    I said: well with all due respect sir, then you should know better than to be handling that rifle like you are.

    So now he finally has an accidental discharge, and he shoots a hole in the floor. I called my boss over and told him what happened and my boss told him to leave. Now as he was packing up his stuff he told my boss: I don't know why you're making me leave, it wasn't my fault that the gun just went off.....

    Now I’m all for the 2A and I think that everyone whom can “LEGALLY BUY” a firearm should be able too do so “BUT”, I do not feel that everyone should be able too have a firearm, and I can back that up with plenty of the things that I experience on ah daily basis.

    And if you do not believe me, or agree with me, then go volunteer as an RSO at your local gun range for just one-day. And before you know it, you too will agree with me.

    Now let me put this simple question to the test: “what is the best safety on ah gun”?

    Now let's see some answers
    Rock and Glock likes this.

  7. #36
    Senior Member Array Okeechobee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Bred and Born In The Beautiful South
    Posts
    691
    Stock photo. Mine is a little better looking than that.

    Name:  brain.jpg
Views: 73
Size:  6.7 KB
    OD*, Struckat and msgt/ret like this.

  8. #37
    Sponsor
    Array DRM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Near Historic Williamsburg, Virginia
    Posts
    1,183

    Lightbulb How NOT to draw from seated in a car!

    Go about 30 seconds into this video...

    But first click on the "COG WHEEL" in the lower right of the screen.

    Then left click on SPEED ">" arrow and slow speed down to .25.

    Note trigger finger and muzzle sweeping the legs.

    OD* likes this.
    "Think Street, Train Sport, Practice Art" - Chris Haueter, Gracie Jiu Jitsu Black Belt

    D.R. Middlebrooks - Pro Shooting Coach & Custom Gunsmith
    Tactical Shooting Academy & Custom Shop
    www.TacticalShooting.com

  9. #38
    New Member Array Maimi_Heat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Gothenburg
    Posts
    6
    Teaching kids control them selfs, their negative emotions, their demons, and teach to rule it. Never force the anger on humans, but on other non-life objects, just my 2c

  10. #39
    VIP Member
    Array CG11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    NorthWestern Arizona
    Posts
    5,217
    Teaching personal responsibility is a big vacuum in society today. Our leaders continually tell us it's someone else's fault, as do teachers, parent, and now even judges. When we stop all the feel-good crap and teach our kids to stand up to what they do, we will go a long way toward teaching a culture of safety. It makes a difference when you know you are responsible for your actions.
    Rock and Glock, OD* and Wolf357 like this.
    So who is this Will that everybody fires at, what did he do, and how come he's not dead yet??

  11. #40
    Member Array since9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    228
    Quote Originally Posted by zamboni View Post
    And if you do not believe me, or agree with me, then go volunteer as an RSO at your local gun range for just one-day. And before you know it, you too will agree with me.
    Did just that when the regular RSO had to leave for an emergency. I was there for about two hours until he returned. I saw three sweeps (undoubtedly missed more) and had to emergency shut down the range once when some new arrival began walking out to put up his target while guns were popping off all around him.

    It was certainly more unnerving that four summers of lifeguarding my way through college, and I dare say, I was about as on edge as I was flying in combat.

    Now let me put this simple question to the test: “what is the best safety on ah gun”?
    I'd argue it's a tie between a retention holster and properly trained and exercised gray matter between one's ears.
    How many times must we see defenseless people die before we realize being defenseless isn't the answer? // The First protects the Second and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect EVERYTHING WE'VE GOT.

  12. #41
    Member Array since9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    228

    Risk Management 101

    This is a great topic! Reading through the posts, I'm reminded of my career in military aviation (I flew B-52s and C-130s).

    We did our absolute best to train as a safely as mission requirements allowed, but truth be told, flying either one under realistic training conditions remains dangerous. While I was in, multiple friends died in each airframe during training, invariably by doing something "dumb, stupid or different." I must admit I and my crews almost bought it a handful of times for the same reasons. Fortunately, proper risk management and CRM (crew resource management) saved our bacon.

    After the B-52 accident at Fairchild (I knew and worked with them all), I began paying a lot closer attention to safety issues, only in the Air Force we called it Risk Management.

    Couple of takeaways:

    1. We can maximize safety i.e. eliminate all risk simply by grounding all aircraft. Unfortunately, this doesn't accomplish the mission any more than does confiscating all firearms, with identical results: The bad guys come out of the woodwork. When England banned most private ownership of firearms, the violent crime rate per capita -- including murder -- tripled. It remains about two and a half times higher than it was prior to the ban.

    2. Given the nature of the threat, we must first devise the most expedient and proper response to the threat before examining the aspects of risk. When someone is shooting at you from any distance beyond a foot or three, martial arts aren't going to save you, and most other approaches to defense become exceedingly problematic. In the vast majority of shooting situations, the most effective deterrent and defensive weapon is a firearm. Shoot back! But we all know this...

    3. The risks associated with the proper use of firearms are easily "mitigated" through proper education (knowledge), training (experience), and procedure (TTP).

    Before I continue, let's examine 5 Ways to Manage Risk. Short history of risk: Some projects, including global war and spaceflight are just too big or too costly to allow for failure. Serious billions of dollars have been spent managing risk, and there are five things managers can do, depending upon the likelihood of failure and the cost of failure.

    1. Accept the Risk: This only works when the cost of failure is low. Paintball won't kill you, so you accept the very low risk and have fun, getting shot multiple times. Whoo-whee! Just look at those bruises!

    2. Avoid the Risk: Both the likelihood of dying after being shot with live rounds is very high, as is the cost of dying, which is why we don't play live-round-ball. We avoid it. It's also why we avoid gunfire in the streets.

    3. Transfer the Risk: Most cops aren't trained to counter bank heist gone bad hostage situations against multiple armed shooters. So, they transfer the risk of engagement to S.W.A.T., who is trained to handle the situation. It's also wise to transfer the risk of a child who is too young to physically handle a firearm into the future, when they're neuromusculature system is more advanced.

    4. Mitigate the Risk: When the likelihood of failure is high and the cost is high, but we cannot avoid the risk, then we must take steps to mitigate either the likelihood or the severity or failure. This is where I see the greatest need for an improved "Safety Culture." For example, we minimize the likelihood of children and adults gaining unauthorized access to a loaded weapon by using gun safes, retention holsters, anti-grab techniques, locked doors, better locks, etc. Cops, the military and civilians alike mitigate the cost of getting shot through body armor and the use of barriers. We also mitigate the threat of a shooter by practicing how to engage and stop a shooter in as short a time as possible. We mitigate the risk of stray bullets hitting bystanders through range practice, under increasingly hostile conditions, so that our aim remains both quick and accurate regardless of the conditions.

    5. Exploit the Risk: This only applies when the risk has a positive impact. For example, when my 9 yo son let me know he'd like to learn how to shoot a gun, I created a three-part lesson plan of about 50 minutes each, covering the history and legal framework of firearms in the U.S., firearms and range safety, then a hands-on with my 9mm and snap-caps. After those three days, I took him to the range. Was his shooting a firearm risky? Sure. However, I exploited the risk by turning it into a relatively safe training week in order to mitigate his future risk of being around firearms.

    In closing, I think if we examine our safety culture within the framework of Risk Management's 5 Ways of Managing Risk, then I believe we can certainly make better headway with various management types, including many politicians, as they're already familiar with risk management terminology. It lends greater credibility to our voices and enables us to reach a wider audience who would otherwise shut us off if we stuck to the very true but not very convincing one-sentence memes.

    Addendum on Exploiting a Risk: If a message forum like Defensive Carry were flooded with newbies due to a rapid rise in crime, mass shootings, or terrorism, that wouldn't be a threat to block (avoiding the risk) because it's overwhelming the moderators. It's an opportunity to educate (exploiting the risk) and allow the board to be a beacon of light and sanity by deputizing those of us who've been admins or mods on forums before, or in the physical realm, those of us who have been managers, team leaders, supervisors, commanders, or otherwise been in positions of authority over others and have both the knowledge and experience to hit the sweet spot when it comes to an admin or mod.
    sdprof likes this.
    How many times must we see defenseless people die before we realize being defenseless isn't the answer? // The First protects the Second and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect EVERYTHING WE'VE GOT.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •