How do you know when the barrel is clean enough

How do you know when the barrel is clean enough

This is a discussion on How do you know when the barrel is clean enough within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I clean my 300 weatherby Mag after each 6 rounds when sighting in. I broke in the barrel exactly like Weathery suggests. After 40-50 patches ...

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Thread: How do you know when the barrel is clean enough

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    New Member Array weatherby77's Avatar
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    How do you know when the barrel is clean enough

    I clean my 300 weatherby Mag after each 6 rounds when sighting in. I broke in the barrel exactly like Weathery suggests. After 40-50 patches I still see traces of carbon. I use Weatherby ammo (black box) why does it take so long to get to a point where there is NO trace of carbon???

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    VIP Member Array G-man*'s Avatar
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    It’s probably not carbon you are seeing, it’s copper fouling.
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    Distinguished Member Array CavemanBob's Avatar
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    The accuracy of more barrels is destroyed by over or improper cleaning than by getting shot out. 40 - 50 patches, you're way over-cleaning IMHO. Three or four repetitions of wet patch, dry patch should be sufficient and be sure to use a proper size and quality one-piece cleaning rod and a bore guide.
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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    I have to agree on the over-cleaning aspect. I'll put 100-150 rounds through my rifle in a session and then clean it. I run a couple CLP- or Hoppes-soaked patches through the bore, let it soak for a bit, follow with a swipe or two with a brass brush, and then a few clean patches to wipe it clean. A half dozen patches total should be al it takes. If it will be a while before I shoot again--meaning weeks--I run an oily patch through the bore and leave the residue.

    Barrels don't need to be sparkling clean, and they generally don't shoot most accurately as such, despite what your DI might have said.
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    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    I run a brush through it once or twice, followed by a patch or two and call it good.
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    I am onboard with the others who have commented. I only shoot a handgun but once had to clean my rifle under battle conditions. It is amazing how little maintenance a barrel needs if you do it right. I clean my pistol after each range trip. A swab with CLP through the barrel and let it sit for five or so minutes. Then a wire brush through it a couple times. End up with dry patches until they come out dry. Then stop. Never put any oil in the barrel. Once you go through the procedure just stop inspecting it.

    While some folks do not clean there firearm except rarely I think that is a good way to get copper and/or lead deposits in the barrel. It only takes a couple minutes to clean a barrel. The rest of the gun can wait if need be.
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    VIP Member Array HotBrass45's Avatar
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    What procedure are you using to inspect the barrel? Lighting-wise that is
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    VIP Member Array graydude's Avatar
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    With a new barrel there may be slight surface imperfections if it hasn't been lapped. Consider J-B Bore Bright to polish off any problem areas and reduce how much jacket is left in the bore. https://www.brownells.com/gun-cleani...aspx?rrec=true
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    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    As above, any rough spot will hold carbon, or copper. Think about scrubbing tile. The smooth surfaces come clean with just a wipe down. But to get the grout lines clean you have to scrub.

    If the accuracy is good don't sweat the small stuff.
    I run a wet brush through the bore, let it set for long enough to wipe down the bolt and other accessories, send another wet brush down bore, and then clean up with a few patches. This has worked well for me.

    My Grandfather used to hand lap his barrels. Sometimes it took several days to do it right. I can't prove they are any more accurate, But those hand polished barrels are definitely easier to clean. DR
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    Distinguished Member Array darbo's Avatar
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    I run 1 or 2 wet patches through the barrel and then set the barrel aside while I clean the rest of the gun. When I get back to the barrel I run another wet patch through and then a couple passes with a brass brush, followed by 1 or 2 wet patches and then 1 or 2 dry patches. Knowing the gun will sit for a while I run an oiled patch through it then a dry patch. Good, bad, indifferent, that's my process!
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    Senior Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    Yea 30-40 patches? Way too many. I could clean all the guns I own with that many.
    I use hoppes soaked patch, let it sit a while then a brush. Few clean patches.
    Follow up with a copper solvent soaked, let it sit, brush, then clean patches usually 4 or 5 .
    If not shooting it for a while run some ballistol down barrel.

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    VIP Member Array Nmuskier's Avatar
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    I knew my barrel was clean when my drill sergeant told me it was clean.

    A pass with a solvent soaked patch. A few passes with a solvent soaked brush. One pass with that old soaked patch. A few passes with clean, dry patches. Don't over clean.
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    For nearly 30 years I've been relying on Sweet's 7.62 for copper fouling cleaning chores. Used per the directions on the bottle it's kept my M1's bore clean and grouping well for many high-power match seasons. It's indispensable for my Ruger M77 V .220 Swift which is a copper fouling fiend. Rifle shoots as well now as ever.



    I don't generally use it on rifles that only see occasional shooting use. These receive simple patching with Hoppe's No. 9.

    For severe cases J-B Bore cleaner can be helpful. I tend to use it on antique or vintage bores that are less than pristine. Just to "get the cobwebs out" you know. Good for lead removal in handgun barrels.

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    Sorry if this is obvious to some but it might be worth saying for some others. There is a simple way to check barrel cleanliness. With the breech open and facing a light source holster a clean white patch in the breech so the light reflects off it. Then look down the barrel. Is you do not see any foreign matter with the eye, then the barrel is clean. And remember, never oil the tube. It needs to be dry to be easier to clean after firing.
    Last edited by 1942bull; July 22nd, 2019 at 01:50 PM.
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    Distinguished Member Array RedSafety's Avatar
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    No oil in the barrel? What about rust? I always thought a very light coat of oil on the last patch, just enough to put a minor film on the barrel for protection from rust.
    bmcgilvray likes this.
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