Different kind of practice, getting ready for deer season.

Different kind of practice, getting ready for deer season.

This is a discussion on Different kind of practice, getting ready for deer season. within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; This morning I had a couple friends out for deer season "practice". We left the precision rifles home and shot steel at varying distances from ...

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Thread: Different kind of practice, getting ready for deer season.

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Different kind of practice, getting ready for deer season.

    This morning I had a couple friends out for deer season "practice".

    We left the precision rifles home and shot steel at varying distances from 220 to 375 yards using our deer rifles. No bench resting, no kestrels or ballistic software and we shot from field positions; prone off backpacks, shooting sticks, tripods etc. It was a blast, I shot my Nolser M48 in .270 and my little REM M7 in .260REM which is a 300+ yard capable deer gun. Often where we hunt the grass is too tall to go prone, even off a backpack, so working the sticks/tripod is essential. Last 3 bucks I've taken, two tens and a 5x4 were all off a tripod sitting. What is normally a 'chip shot' with a precision gun with mildot reticle, ballistic software, and weather data is fun and challenging with the meat guns. Got to practice holdovers and subtense using the standard Leupold duplex reticle (verified distances with a laser), neither of my friends were familiar with the ranging capabilities of the Leupold Duplex and SFP scope. On average we were withing about 30 yds + or - of the laser.



    White specks across pond are tgts



    I've got a match tomorrow evening (IDPA) so as soon as it cools down, I'll head out and run some drills to knock the cobwebs off the pistol shooting.
    homo homini lupus est

  2. #2
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    I was out doing the same thing! Shooting from a bucket seat and shooting sticks. I had forgotten how much fun shooting a 30-30 is! DR

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array DownInTheDark's Avatar
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    That is some beautiful country.

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    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
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    I will be working the club's open to the public hunting rifle sight-in service the next four weekends.
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    VIP Member Array Cornhusker95's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck R. View Post
    This morning I had a couple friends out for deer season "practice".

    We left the precision rifles home and shot steel at varying distances from 220 to 375 yards using our deer rifles. No bench resting, no kestrels or ballistic software and we shot from field positions; prone off backpacks, shooting sticks, tripods etc. It was a blast, I shot my Nolser M48 in .270 and my little REM M7 in .260REM which is a 300+ yard capable deer gun. Often where we hunt the grass is too tall to go prone, even off a backpack, so working the sticks/tripod is essential. Last 3 bucks I've taken, two tens and a 5x4 were all off a tripod sitting. What is normally a 'chip shot' with a precision gun with mildot reticle, ballistic software, and weather data is fun and challenging with the meat guns. Got to practice holdovers and subtense using the standard Leupold duplex reticle (verified distances with a laser), neither of my friends were familiar with the ranging capabilities of the Leupold Duplex and SFP scope. On average we were withing about 30 yds + or - of the laser.



    White specks across pond are tgts



    I've got a match tomorrow evening (IDPA) so as soon as it cools down, I'll head out and run some drills to knock the cobwebs off the pistol shooting.
    Nice...And you were shooting in positions like you may encounter out in the field.
    Chuck R. likes this.

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Bravo Chuck!

    I always enjoy seeing how others prepare to hunt, how they practice, and what terrain they must negotiate.

    My deer area is dramatically different. Thick cover and brush. You can generally hear them before you see them, and when you see them they are on top of you. Fast shooting is the order of the day, and a short range thumper and low powered optic is what Iím using, usually a 44 or 30-30 carbine.
    i like my 270, but itís not really necessary in my woods, although there are some areas where it would be beneficial.
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  8. #7
    VIP Member Array graydude's Avatar
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    Is it just me, or are some trees dropping leaves early this year? I take that as a sign of some good chilly weather hitting at the start of the rut. Ok, maybe that's wishcasting, but oh well.

    I plan on breaking out the smokepole tomorrow since the public range just reopened. Hopefully I can find a load to give decent groups at 100 yards. Most of my shots are much closer in the thick stuff, but I'd like to know it can do it.
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  9. #8
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownInTheDark View Post
    That is some beautiful country.
    Yup, itís pretty nice for a backyard! Seriously though, NE KS is some very nice country, hilly with trees! Unfortunately (or fortunately) most folks are amazed to find that we have terrain and things are in color.

    Quote Originally Posted by LimaCharlie View Post
    I will be working the club's open to the public hunting rifle sight-in service the next four weekends.
    I feel for you! I occasionally have guys come out to zero and it is by far my least liked shooting activity, especially if itís a guy that doesnít shoot other than the obligatory ďzero before deer seasonĒ. Telling guys that thereís no sense making an adjustment until they shoot something that resembles a group gets old.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cornhusker95 View Post
    Nice...And you were shooting in positions like you may encounter out in the field.
    A lot of it is because I have some form of shooting ADD. I canít stand shooting off a bench at paper, it just bores me to tears. Same thing with a pistol, shooting groups is boring, add speed, movement, multiple tgts etc. and Iím having fun. Iíll shoot paper for load development and zeroing, but after that Iíve got to shoot from positions at something that rings or falls down.

    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Bravo Chuck!
    I always enjoy seeing how others prepare to hunt, how they practice, and what terrain they must negotiate.
    My deer area is dramatically different. Thick cover and brush. You can generally hear them before you see them, and when you see them they are on top of you. Fast shooting is the order of the day, and a short range thumper and low powered optic is what Iím using, usually a 44 or 30-30 carbine.
    i like my 270, but itís not really necessary in my woods, although there are some areas where it would be beneficial.
    ThanksÖ..weíve got plenty of woods on the east side, but lately weíve been heading west. Usually that means hunting edges. The mulies and whitetails normally bed down in CRP (Conservation Reclamation Program, think ďtall grassĒ) and move to and from row crop fields & water. We normally use spot/stalk after sitting in a good spot for the 1st couple hrs, then go on drives through the waddies and gullyís moving them after theyíve bedded. Evenings itís back to sitting. Shots can be from 30-300+ yards. Iíve killed quite a few hiding out in small patches of cover waiting for the season end. It seems the big smart bucks go completely nocturnal once they start hearing the engines shut off and the truck doors slam shut.
    homo homini lupus est

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array graydude's Avatar
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    This was my view this morning. Not as pretty as yours, and only 100 yards, but still nice to be outside shooting the smoke pole. This range just reopened for the season, so a lot of shooters were new to how targets are hung here and I just about ran out of clothespins to share.
    Chuck R. likes this.
    Ride hard, shoot straight, always speak the truth

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