New pistol break in questions - Page 2

New pistol break in questions

This is a discussion on New pistol break in questions within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by Workaholic So I searched. I read bunches of threads. I found that some people suggest 50-100 for break in. Others, more, with ...

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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Workaholic View Post
    So I searched. I read bunches of threads. I found that some people suggest 50-100 for break in. Others, more, with ccw9mm (I think that was the handle) going as far as ~1000. This tells me a lot about mindset for break in as far as quantity. And quality, well, that's a box or 5 of each brand you can get, including sd rounds.

    But, out of everything I found, I didn't find what I was looking for. The other night, I had a thought. And, it didn't make sense to me. When you replace or add a barrel to a rifle receiver, you're supposed to shoot it in. Fire a shot. Use copper solvent, then clean. Then do all this again, like 5 times. Then do it with three shots in between. Then 5. And, some places suggest 10 as well. Depending upon how far you follow this, you are looking at up to 95-100, or more, with a lot of solvent and cleaning involved. Even if this is a 8.5" AR pistol barrel, this is suggested. But it doesn't seem to be suggested for pistols? Am I missing something here? Is, perhaps, the thinking here, that since pistols aren't designed for distance or accuracy, so why bother? I'm confused. Any clarification on this would help. Thanks in advance.
    As you have found in your research, the shoot and clean regimen is recommended for rifles to smooth the barrel of small imperfections to enhance the accuracy for long range shooting. It also helps in reducing fouling and makes cleaning easier in the future. For most handguns this isn't needed as they aren't fired at distances where it matters. For long range handguns it may be somewhat more appropriate.

    The break-in period of shooting for pistols is to allow wearing in of contact surfaces to smooth them and to check for reliability. Some pistol manufactures ship their products with special wear in grease on the rails (think Glock) that accelerates this process. Some pistols do not have tolerances small enough that it matters whether they are worn in or not. I have found that most pistols will become smoother with use. Whether this break-in period is needed is obviously open to debate. Personally I believe it depends upon the manufacturing tolerances. Kahrs are notorious for close tolerances and the need to have a 400 round break in period, to name one manufacturer. I have owned several Kahrs and most needed this amount of firing to become reliable. Most 1911s I have had show increased smoothness upon firing, but depending upon the manufacture may or may not improve reliability after firing several hundred rounds. The many Glocks I have owned have never needed any break-in period (Yes, Glock Perfection!). Some pistols are just junk and no amount of break-in is going to change that, they will always be finicky and subject to problems. YMMV.

  2. #17
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    Sounds like I over thought the break in needed. I didn't do any of the one shot clean stuff for my current carry pistol. But now, I have this 1911that I'll be taking to the range this weekend, and it's a bit higher dollar than the s&w m&p I normally carry. Granted, I didn't pay MSRP for it, but what I did pay, is still an awful lot of money, to me at least. Wanted to make sure that I didn't miss anything on this. Thank you for all the responses so far.

    @M1911A1 . I have managed to get 1 box of ammo, at about $1.85 a round. Too expensive for me to consider shooting at the moment, considering it's the only box I found. The guy I got it from, come to find out, had a second box. If I had known, I would have bought it too. Until I find more ammo for it, she is nothing more than a safe queen. Although, come to think of it, I probably need to break her down and make sure there isnt any dust accumulated in the barrel or action. If you ever make it down this way, PM me, and I'll make sure you get a chance to see how close to 100% she is.
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  3. #18
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    I break in a new pistol by shooting it, and maybe cleaning it after. Maybe...
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  5. #19
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    Neither of my Kahrs needed a "break in period". They were 100% jam free right out of the box.
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  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlggray View Post
    Neither of my Kahrs needed a "break in period". They were 100% jam free right out of the box.
    Good one...You mean the 200 round thing is just a suggestion?
    Mine also have worked great out of the box.
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  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    I break in a new pistol by shooting it, and maybe cleaning it after. Maybe...
    Good point! I may shoot every week at the range, wipe down my pistol before putting it back into the holster, then clean it once per month, detail strip and deal with the fine points once per year. OCD is not on my list.

    For a daily carry pistol I find that lint from my clothing, maybe exfoliated skin cells and other gunk, is a more persistent issue than residue from actually firing the pistol.

    Side note: It has been my observation over my 60 years handling firearms that too many people over-lubricate their weapons. Excessive oil or grease tends to collect powder residue in the small recesses within the gun's action, and that accumulated gunk can cause serious trouble over time. I am careful with my lubricants to avoid these issues.
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  8. #22
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired badge 1 View Post
    Good point! I may shoot every week at the range, wipe down my pistol before putting it back into the holster, then clean it once per month, detail strip and deal with the fine points once per year. OCD is not on my list.

    For a daily carry pistol I find that lint from my clothing, maybe exfoliated skin cells and other gunk, is a more persistent issue than residue from actually firing the pistol.

    Side note: It has been my observation over my 60 years handling firearms that too many people over-lubricate their weapons. Excessive oil or grease tends to collect powder residue in the small recesses within the gun's action, and that accumulated gunk can cause serious trouble over time. I am careful with my lubricants to avoid these issues.
    Yep. Depending on how much ammo I put through it, sometimes I will shoot a new gun a few times before cleaning it just to see how it does. Not some ďI donít trust a gun if it malfunctions in the first 1000 roundsĒ or anything like that though. I donít get a whole lot of lint/dirt in my guns from edc, I guess Iím an oddball there.
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  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    ...and maybe cleaning it after. Maybe...
    This ^^^^^

    My P365, made very early in the production cycle, was shot over 500 rounds before cleaning. Couple of failures from steel ammo and the rest flawless. Making firearms is not rocket science. In every hobby and interest, the subjective minutia becomes the focus.
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  10. #24
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    I don't "break in" my guns as much as just use them. Range toys, fun guns, plinkers, and such just get inspected, lubed, and shot. Hunting guns get the same treatment with enough rounds of chosen hunting ammo to sight in and function test. Carry guns get inspected, lubed, a mag or two of ball shot through them to check function then I run them in a match or two. If they get through a match without any problems I run a few mags of carry ammo to make sure it feeds and function with it and call it good to go.
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  11. #25
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    Not to sound snobby, but I've never felt the need to or had to "break in" any HK. Not one problem and I basically abuse my HK range guns.

    But the rest, I've had at least one problem. The most disappointing modern pistol I have is the Sig P938. And a few posters on another board told me I needed to break the gun in. I just dont see a point in shooting hundreds of rounds and then when reaching number X (whatever that is and how does anyone really know), the gun is deemed ready.

  12. #26
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    I think a lot of good semi autos get blamed for malfunctions when it's actually the shooter in my opinion. The smaller and lighter the pistol is the more often they seem to get blamed for being terrible guns. Some people should just stick to revolvers.

    I bought a used Kel-Tec P-40 .40 cal that weighs 14.6 ounces empty that supposedly just would not shoot a full mag without multiple jams . The guy said he bought it new and never got a full magazine to fire though it without it jamming. The gun looked like new and I got a great deal on it.

    When I bought it I figured I could get it to work by filing and smoothing down the feed ramp and then buffing it out on my bench buffer which would probably fix it along with smoothing any burrs on the rails and using some light synthetic grease instead of oil on the rails. To my surprise from the first day I took it to the range, before I did any work on it, that gun has never had a failure of any sort during the 12 years that I've owned it.

    Evidently the guy was either to weak or to afraid of the .40 cal recoil to be able to hold the gun correctly without letting the recoil flip the barrel up and the gun fly back on him which takes away the power needed for it to be able to eject the spent round and the springs to be able to load the next round.

    The Kel-Tec P-3AT .380 also got a bad reputation with the 1st generation model because people just didn't know how to handle the little 7.5 ounce pistol's recoil which is quiet snappy. I have a 1st generation P-3AT that I've carried daily since back around 2003 and again I have never had a failure of any sort with this gun. They're great little guns but they have to be held and held tight...no limp wristing.

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  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nifty View Post
    Not to sound snobby, but I've never felt the need to or had to "break in" any HK. Not one problem and I basically abuse my HK range guns.

    But the rest, I've had at least one problem. The most disappointing modern pistol I have is the Sig P938. And a few posters on another board told me I needed to break the gun in. I just dont see a point in shooting hundreds of rounds and then when reaching number X (whatever that is and how does anyone really know), the gun is deemed ready.
    Both my P938 and Micro 9 were a bit finicky until I ran a couple of boxes through them, then they were pretty much consistently reliable after that. Small guns and tight tolerances, so it wasn't a huge surprise. Besides, taking a new gun out and shooting it is half the fun!
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  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmf552 View Post
    One observation I will make about over 50 years of shooting Colt, S&W and Ruger revolvers is that I never even think about a need for "break-in" with a wheelgun. You put bullets in it and it shoots. Period.
    I have to say that I have had two recent manufacture S&W revolvers that failed to ignite primers reliably. Both had the cursed internal firing pin.

    This issue has led me to:

    1. Replace the firing pin with an extended pin immediately.
    2. Shop for older guns without internal firing pins.
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  15. #29
    Distinguished Member Array drmordo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nifty View Post
    Not to sound snobby, but I've never felt the need to or had to "break in" any HK. Not one problem and I basically abuse my HK range guns.
    FWIW, I got a police trade in HK USP .40 that ran FMJ ammo fine but blew the mag out of the gun when shooting hot Underwood JHPs. So maybe a "break-in" wasn't required, but an ops test certainly revealed a problem.

    This goes back to my main point in all these threads - you just can't know a gun is reliable with your carry ammo until you test it.
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  16. #30
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    For auto's I just shoot them and keep adding oil until they are so filthy I can't stand handling 'em. By then, they are nicely lapped in.
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