One in the barrel? - Page 2

One in the barrel?

This is a discussion on One in the barrel? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Should be part of the basic training for every new shooter. Any time there is a significant difference (report, recoil, muzzle blast, whatever) it is ...

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Thread: One in the barrel?

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array retired badge 1's Avatar
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    Should be part of the basic training for every new shooter. Any time there is a significant difference (report, recoil, muzzle blast, whatever) it is time to unload and thoroughly check the firearm.

    A squib is usually the result of inadequate powder ignition/burning. Might be a round loaded without a powder charge. Might be a round with inadequate powder charge to expel the bullet via the barrel. Might be a failure of the powder to ignite or burn completely. In any case, the force of the primer is usually sufficient to drive the bullet into the bore.

    Removing a bullet lodged in the bore will require some force. Best method I have found is to use a padded bench vise to hold the barrel, soak the bore with penetrating oil and allow it to sit for several hours, then drive the bullet through the bore using a hardwood dowel or a punch made of brass or aluminum (to prevent damage to the rifling). After removal the barrel should be carefully inspected for bulges, cracks or any other damage (a micrometer can be handy to measure the exterior of the barrel to detect any bulging that may not be readily visible).

    As others have pointed out, anyone who shoots for any length of time is likely to experience a squib load or two. I can recall 3 of my own experience, as well as several more in other shooters' firearms. Probably more frequently occurs with reloaded ammunition, but factory ammo can exhibit defects also (anything manufactured by the billions is likely to have an occasional defect show up).

    I've been shooting for well over 50 years, and I have trained a dozen others along the way. Detecting and dealing with squibs is always part of the drill.
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  2. #17
    Member Array Rook49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GpTom View Post
    So anybody know for sure what happens if one slug is still in the barrel and you shoot again?

    It's gotta go somewhere. And a bullet getting propelled out of the chamber with 40, 50, or 60,000 psi of pressure, or whatever it maybe, is not going to just bump another bullet out of the barrel.




  3. #18
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    If it's .45 ACP, chances are nothing worse than a bulged barrel will happen.
    I'm not recommending that anyone ignore a squib, but in .45 ACP it's not an instant death sentence for gun or shooter. Here's what a bulged barrel looks like:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails One in the barrel?-barrel-bulge.jpg  

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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    If it's .45 ACP, chances are nothing worse than a bulged barrel will happen.
    I'm not recommending that anyone ignore a squib, but in .45 ACP it's not an instant death sentence for gun or shooter. Here's what a bulged barrel looks like:
    To Rook49 and gasmitty, thank you for the photos! To break it down further, the explanation here is that the .45 auto is a low pressure round to begin with so as the pressure is driven up by the blockage it approaches but likely stops short of total failure.

    This is elementary of course, but with all the new shooters of late it bears repeating and as retired badge 1 said, "Should be part of the basic training for every new shooter."

    We must all keep our brains in gear when dealing with firearms and take note of unusually quiet shots, or lack of recoil, or the slide not cycling.
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  6. #20
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rook49 View Post
    It's gotta go somewhere. And a bullet getting propelled out of the chamber with 40, 50, or 60,000 psi of pressure, or whatever it maybe, is not going to just bump another bullet out of the barrel.



    A little bondo and JB Weld and it should be good to go.
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  7. #21
    Distinguished Member Array GpTom's Avatar
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    I talked to him again today and he said that he did notice that something was amiss and that is why he quit for the day. I must have misunderstood when he said look what I found in the barrel when I cleaned my gun.
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