Stainless Steel Guide Rod .... Benefits?

Stainless Steel Guide Rod .... Benefits?

This is a discussion on Stainless Steel Guide Rod .... Benefits? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I came across a complete, Plug-N-Play, stainless steel guide rod assembly available for my particular EDC, shipped for $35. Why should I? What are the ...

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    Senior Member Array KimBobTex's Avatar
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    Stainless Steel Guide Rod .... Benefits?

    I came across a complete, Plug-N-Play, stainless steel guide rod assembly available for my particular EDC, shipped for $35.

    Why should I?
    What are the benefits over the OEM assembly?
    Are the benefits worth the expense?
    Gun Free Zones are totally effective, and 100% safe ... (wait for it) ... (wait for it) ... until a bad guy with a gun shows up! Then suddenly, you have an uncontested Kill Zone of defensless sheep, patiently awaiting their turn for the slaughter.

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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    What is it going to do that your OEM guide rod isn't doing now--for $35 less?
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    Senior Member Array KimBobTex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    What is it going to do that your OEM guide rod isn't doing now--for $35 less?
    OV, the answer to your question is exactly what Iím trying to find out ... mine is working just fine (or I wouldnít be carrying it), & Itís certainly not cosmetic.
    Gun Free Zones are totally effective, and 100% safe ... (wait for it) ... (wait for it) ... until a bad guy with a gun shows up! Then suddenly, you have an uncontested Kill Zone of defensless sheep, patiently awaiting their turn for the slaughter.

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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimBobTex View Post
    OV, the answer to your question is exactly what Iím trying to find out ... mine is working just fine (or I wouldnít be carrying it), & Itís certainly not cosmetic.
    It may just be a solution looking for a problem. What is your EDC? Any history of guide-rod issues in that make/model?
    KevinRohrer, Bad Bob, OD* and 1 others like this.
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    The only reason I could think of to switch out an existing working guide rod for an aftermarket one - would be to add a Tungsten Carbide specifically to add weight.
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    If replacing a polymer / plastic unit it may be preferred.

    I see a lot of them getting thrown into 1911s as an "upgrade" to the GI style spring guide and plug and they are not needed.

    I have a couple Beretta 92s that have steel rods vs the current OEM plastic rods.



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    My approach is to leave a guns internal operations only unless there is a need for replacing a part...so far that has worked out 100% for me.
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    New Member Array rlggray's Avatar
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    Only thing I can think of is, maybe a little extra weight.
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    Member Array mmb617's Avatar
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    I have a Ruger Security 9 that has more muzzle flip than I think it should, certainly more than my M&P Compact 9 which is a similar size gun. I noticed that the Ruger had a hollow guide rod while the Smith has a solid one so I thought that replacing the hollow rod with a solid one would add weight to the front of the Ruger and help control that problem.

    I bought a solid SS guide rod assembly with the same rate recoil spring as stock. The good news is that it noticeably reduced the muzzle flip, the bad news is that it introduced a feed problem which was worse to live with than the muzzle flip, so I changed back to stock. I see that the spring and guide rod assembly is available with different spring rates so maybe there is one that would eliminate both problems but I'm not knowledgeable enough to know whether a heavier of lighter spring would be appropriate and at $26 each I don't intend to buy several just to see if any of them work. The Ruger is obviously not suited to be a carry gun so I keep it for range use only.
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    Member Array m5215's Avatar
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    Personally I replace all plastic parts on a pistol with metal ones as metal is stronger and more durable than plastic for long term use and I intended to keep all my pistols for long term. Also metal parts add a little weight to a pistol which for me is something that I prefer.
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    VIP Member Array Cornhusker95's Avatar
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    $35 is piece of mind...I have had a couple guns with plastic/Polymer guide rods...They functioned fine but
    got chewed up over time...I know it is a manufacturer cost reducing strategy but a moving part none the less.
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    Senior Member Array KimBobTex's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input folks .... my existing guide rod assembly is metal, it would be a no-brainer if it was plastic, but not the case. The gun works, is comfortable & shoots fine as is.

    No need to spend $ís on a solution looking for a problem.
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    Gun Free Zones are totally effective, and 100% safe ... (wait for it) ... (wait for it) ... until a bad guy with a gun shows up! Then suddenly, you have an uncontested Kill Zone of defensless sheep, patiently awaiting their turn for the slaughter.

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    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
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    A heavier guide rod can help a little with muzzle flip, but may need different weight recoil springs to function correctly.
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    Member Array mmb617's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LimaCharlie View Post
    A heavier guide rod can help a little with muzzle flip, but may need different weight recoil springs to function correctly.
    Would a heavier guide rod generally require a heavier recoil spring? I would think so to combat the increased inertia but I could be wrong. Maybe it works the other way and a lighter recoil spring would be the ticket?

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    VIP Member Array Cornhusker95's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmb617 View Post
    Would a heavier guide rod generally require a heavier recoil spring? I would think so to combat the increased inertia but I could be wrong. Maybe it works the other way and a lighter recoil spring would be the ticket?
    All the ones i have bought have had the captive recoil spring and have came all assembled ....Rather the manufacturers factored that in or not i don't know, but
    they have all worked fine for me.

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