Family Sues DEA and TSA After Elderly Man's Life Savings Were Seized at Airport - Page 2

Family Sues DEA and TSA After Elderly Man's Life Savings Were Seized at Airport

This is a discussion on Family Sues DEA and TSA After Elderly Man's Life Savings Were Seized at Airport within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; OK, the original story was that he didn't trust banks. But the legal complaint states, "In late August 2019, Terry entrusted his daughter, Rebecca, with ...

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Thread: Family Sues DEA and TSA After Elderly Man's Life Savings Were Seized at Airport

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array jmf552's Avatar
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    OK, the original story was that he didn't trust banks. But the legal complaint states, "In late August 2019, Terry entrusted his daughter, Rebecca, with $82,373 in cash—his and his parents’ life savings—so she could deposit it into a new bank account for him. She apparently got the cash in Pittsburgh and was going to fly with it back to Massachusetts and put it in a bank. So, new facts from the original story:
    • Whether he trusted banks or not, he agreed to have this money put in a bank.
    • It was not the owner of the money who acted stupidly, it was his daughter. She could have very easily deposited that money in a bank in Pittsburgh that had a branch in Massachusetts and now there would be no problem.
    • So again, both the old man and the daughter had every right to do what they did. The government had no right to take the money and I hope they get the money back and then some. But it was not a smart move on the daughter's part.
    airslot, baren, Cypher and 1 others like this.
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  2. #17
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmf552 View Post
    OK, the original story was that he didn't trust banks. But the legal complaint states, "In late August 2019, Terry entrusted his daughter, Rebecca, with $82,373 in cash—his and his parents’ life savings—so she could deposit it into a new bank account for him. She apparently got the cash in Pittsburgh and was going to fly with it back to Massachusetts and put it in a bank. So, new facts from the original story:
    • Whether he trusted banks or not, he agreed to have this money put in a bank.
    • It was not the owner of the money who acted stupidly, it was his daughter. She could have very easily deposited that money in a bank in Pittsburgh that had a branch in Massachusetts and now there would be no problem.
    • So again, both the old man and the daughter had every right to do what they did. The government had no right to take the money and I hope they get the money back and then some. But it was not a smart move on the daughter's part.
    Smart or not, the government has no right to seize the old guy's honestly earned money.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Array retired badge 1's Avatar
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    Well, most of us seem to agree that our government is a lot like the thieves in our world.

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  5. #19
    Member Array GerryS's Avatar
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    When they seize your cash, do you get a receipt? Do they just take your money and let you carry on with your travel plans?

    I guess I'm suspicious in nature; The first thought I had was that the daughter kept the money.

    Gerry

  6. #20
    VIP Member Array Texas Red's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColoradoDiablo View Post
    Stupid or not...there is no excuse for government confiscation of private property without justification. The DEA's confiscate above $5,000 policy is beyond the pale. You should really read the complaint.
    This confiscation insanity is brought to you courtesy of the failed "war on drugs."

    A war the drugs have won overwhelmingly.
    airslot, ETXhiker, OD* and 6 others like this.
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  7. #21
    Distinguished Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    The TSA is a joke. Spend their time looking for shoe bombs in flip flops and hassling old folks and young kids.
    They have made air travel almost intolerable.
    We really need to take back our government and the 2nd amendment i only a part of it.
    airslot, ETXhiker, sdprof and 2 others like this.

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Red View Post
    This confiscation insanity is brought to you courtesy of the failed "war on drugs."

    A war the drugs have won overwhelmingly.
    So you advocate free, unabated movement and use of cocaine, heroin, meth, crystal, etc.?
    5lima30ret likes this.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
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  9. #23
    Distinguished Member Array ETXhiker's Avatar
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    I would like to see congress address the "policing for profit" mentality that abuses citizens with its lack of due process and its incentive for authority to misbehave. I have utmost respect for police, but this is simply wrong and an abuse of power. Someone is selling drugs? Fine. Put them in jail. But don't take their property.
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  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ETXhiker View Post
    I would like to see congress address the "policing for profit" mentality that abuses citizens with its lack of due process and its incentive for authority to misbehave. I have utmost respect for police, but this is simply wrong and an abuse of power. Someone is selling drugs? Fine. Put them in jail. But don't take their property.
    I don't have an issue seizing property used in illicit acts--after trial and conviction.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
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  11. #25
    Distinguished Member Array ETXhiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I don't have an issue seizing property used in illicit acts--after trial and conviction.
    I didn't either. Until I saw them take some elderly widow's house, because her grandson who had come to stay with her, was selling drugs. If it's El Chapo, that's different. Yes, maybe make that judgement part of the punishment phase of the trial. A little due process would go a long way to fixing this.
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  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    Yes After Trial and Conviction. But not before.

  13. #27
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    It's just like the government to rob us of due process. See "red flag laws", also.
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  14. #28
    VIP Member Array ColoradoDiablo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KILTED COWBOY View Post
    Yes After Trial and Conviction. But not before.
    There are times where seizing of assets to prevent their disappearance might prove a useful and appropriate tool. This isn't one of those times. The person(s) from whom the money was seized are not accused of any crimes.
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  15. #29
    Senior Member Array pskys2's Avatar
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    Yep every Drug Lord carries their Billions in Tupperware?
    What's more if a small business regularly deposits just under $10,000 in a Bank, the Feds (IRS,DEA) is notified and suddenly the small business has their bank accounts frozen and seized and ultimately may have their business assets impounded. And once done they will never return all of the money. Sometimes none of it. There are many such cases. So depositing or keeping it in a bank may not be safe either!
    Another case of laws that affect the lawful more than the lawless.
    AND a powerful Buearaucracy believing all money/assets are property of the state.

  16. #30
    Senior Member Array Psycho41's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoganbeg View Post
    Asset forfeiture has been being abused for a long time now. One would think a this man's money would be recoverable through the courts but at his age he might not live to see it happen. Just another sign of how far we've fallen!
    The biggest problem with asset forfeiture is that, in most cases, the agency confiscating the assets get to keep the assets. So, they have a vested interest in seizing assets even when there is little to no evidence of wrong doing. Many have stated that just having large sums of cash is enough to confiscate w/o any indication of illegality. Responses from those agencies are typically that if the funds weren't not part of illegal activities, the citizen can "go through the courts" to get their assets back. Yet, that can take a long time and a lot of money to accomplish. In a society where we are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, I fail to see how our "property" is somehow guilty until proven innocent.

    Having said that, I can see a purpose for such a process to thwart crime. But, there needs to be more oversight:

    1) There should be some objective, reasonable circumstances that would give the impression the assets were linked to criminal activity in order for them to be seized. Merely having a large sum of cash is not enough.
    2) Upon seizure, the government should have a (short) time limit upon which they must provide evidence to sustain why the funds should be permanently seized. I'd say no more than 30 days (or less) to give them the opportunity to investigate if needed. If they do not meet the time limit or cannot provide any justifiable proof, the assets should be returned - with the citizen having to pay zero fees/costs in getting their assets back. For property, there should be compensation if there is any damage (can be paid by funds that are permanently seized).
    3) Absolutely no seized assets should go to agencies that are responsible for seizing the assets (or to any agencies that have any relationship with the seizing agency). E.g. the funds should not go to a police department or the prosecutor's office. In fact, I'd be in favor of using those assets to fund things such as homelessness or drug addition programs.

    This is from 2014: Law enforcement took more stuff from people than burglars did last year
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