A question for our veterans?

A question for our veterans?

This is a discussion on A question for our veterans? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; The last few days I have been working around our county's veteran's cemetery. The area I'm working in has mostly WWII graves. I read the ...

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Thread: A question for our veterans?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    A question for our veterans?

    The last few days I have been working around our county's veteran's cemetery. The area I'm working in has mostly WWII graves. I read the headstones as I pass them and way more than half of those that died between 1940 and 1944 were born before 1900 That makes them at least 40 years old! Quite a few were in there 50's. And there were even a few in there early 60's!
    My Grandfather served in the army during WWII, he was 31 when he enlisted, and was considered quite old! So what would explain why so many older guys? Did they only send the older guys home for burial? Or was it not common for the younger guys to be buried in the veteran's cemetery? There doesn't seem to be anyone here that knows. DR

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    Interesting question, my father was 18 when he enlisted in 1944 not sure how old my uncles were when they enlisted.
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    I'm not sure but possibly it was once reserved for higher ranking officers or enlisted who would generally be older.
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    Could just be the demographics of the town you're in.. Mostly older gents joined from around there.. Maybe there weren't that many young'uns from around those parts.. Everybody joined up back then.. That's why all the women folk worked the manufacturing plants.. I wasn't born yet, so I'm just guessing..
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    Distinguished Member Array dV8r's Avatar
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    I don't know the answer but I do know that a lot of young people died in the influenza outbreak of ~ 1917 - 1919 especially in some communities.
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    Distinguished Member Array GpTom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jumperj View Post
    Could just be the demographics of the town you're in.. Mostly older gents joined from around there.. Maybe there weren't that many young'uns from around those parts.. Everybody joined up back then.. That's why all the women folk worked the manufacturing plants.. I wasn't born yet, so I'm just guessing..
    A lot of women were in the armed forces during the war as nurses and other noncombat jobs. Waves -Wacs and whatever.
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    Member Array jumperj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GpTom View Post
    A lot of women were in the armed forces during the war as nurses and other noncombat jobs. Waves -Wacs and whatever.
    I'm aware of their roll in WWII.. One of my aunts even ferried B-17s during the war.. They played a vital roll in the war effort.. But they also took over manufacturing in this country.. Guess I shouldn't have said ALL the women were in manufacturing... Was just coming up with a theory as to why that particular cemetery was mostly older men.. I stand corrected...
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    Quote Originally Posted by dV8r View Post
    I don't know the answer but I do know that a lot of young people died in the influenza outbreak of ~ 1917 - 1919 especially in some communities.
    I think that there is a lot to be said for that in some demographics . The death toll was so devastating in my county that migrant workers and indigent residents were stacked in a railroad tunnel and the tunnel was blown in on this mass grave . The county could not afford to bury them properly . Seldom talked about history around here .
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    I have a great Uncle who was not old enough. He forged his birth certificate so he could go with his brothers.

    A generation of humble. For every great story recorded there are probably five never told. We are losing a most important part of history this century. God bless them each and everyone!
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    Member Array Truckinbutch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcsoftexas View Post
    I have a great Uncle who was not old enough. He forged his birth certificate so he could go with his brothers.

    A generation of humble. For every great story recorded there are probably five never told. We are losing a most important part of history this century. God bless them each and everyone!
    Well said , Brother .
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    Veterans who died overseas in WW1 and WW2 were typically buried in-theater where they died. Very few were actually shipped home for burial. In Korea, Vietnam, and the more recent wars, it became the custom to bring the boys back home to the World for burial. The are a good number of U.S. Army cemeteries in Europe which hold the remains of those who died in North Africa and western Europe.
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    VIP Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    My Dad enlisted during 1944 when he was 17 years old. Ironically my cousin and I also enlisted (different branches) when we were 17 years old. Not sure why there were so many "older" Vets maybe there was a shortage of "draft age" men? As I recall for many years during Vietnam and post Vietnam you could only enlist or be drafted up to age 27, not sure what the age cutoff is now.
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    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    I'm thinking most were buried in the country they died in. Maybe only those with a family were sent home? It just seems odd, but that would explain why so many that were older were buried there. DR

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    Perhaps many of them were WWI vets who just happened to die during WWII or maybe some never left the service after WWI.
    Regular Army, Officers, Older Demographic or a combination of each could tip the balance.
    My F-I-L served in WWII and is still alive and quite healthy. My M-I-L was British and had her neighborhood bombed regularly by the Nazis.
    They are in their 90s now. Certainly many stories.
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    My dad was born in 1912 and he served. Lots of non teens were all in. A good number of teens joined in too. My father in law signed up when he was 17. Different time than today.
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