Here's just one reason why I don't think sharing your DNA is a good idea

Here's just one reason why I don't think sharing your DNA is a good idea

This is a discussion on Here's just one reason why I don't think sharing your DNA is a good idea within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Without going into a lot of details, I was approached recently by a woman who thought she was related to me snd wanted me to ...

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    VIP Member Array G26Raven's Avatar
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    Here's just one reason why I don't think sharing your DNA is a good idea

    Without going into a lot of details, I was approached recently by a woman who thought she was related to me snd wanted me to get a DNA test. I thought it was a scam and firmly told her I was absolutely not interested. This morning I ran across this article in the Wall Street Journal.

    Customers Handed Over Their DNA. The Company Let the FBI Take a Look.

    The trouble started when the Federal Bureau of Investigation attorney made a personal appeal to Bennett Greenspan.

    Mr. Greenspan, president of FamilyTreeDNA, was used to fielding requests from genealogists, customers, even friends of friends, seeking help with DNA testing. The FBI’s Steve Kramer wasn’t among them.

    The company’s database of over 1.5 million customers could help solve heinous crimes, the attorney said. He wanted to upload DNA data in two cases to see if there were genetic links to other users. Turning up matches to even distant relatives might generate leads....

    Increasing numbers of people are taking DNA tests. As the databases expand, so do uses of the information. Decisions on what uses are permissible largely rest with the controllers of the DNA databases—sometimes a single individual at a company....

    ....Other consumer DNA testing companies, such as 23andMe, Ancestry, and MyHeritage, say they won’t share genetic data with law enforcement unless required to do so by law, such as with a warrant or a subpoena....

    ...Law enforcement is interested in consumer DNA databases because they offer an opportunity to generate new leads with a wider pool of people.


    https://www.wsj.com/articles/custome...ok-11566491162
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    VIP Member Array CDW4ME's Avatar
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    I am who I am, don't care about ancestry. (Heck, I avoid potlucks (get togethers) with living extended family)
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    flh
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    I could care less about being related to a famous Viking or Russian etc , knowing this doesn't define who I am ..
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    Member Array Nifty's Avatar
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    I was adopted and do not know my bio parents. I have zero info. I got an Ancestry.com certificate from a relative, got the initial test done, then forgot all about it. (They do a general report for very little but want you to pay to get extra services).

    It may have been 4 or 5 years then I get an email out of no where one day from a girl who said we had a possible "match" - brother-sister at best. We ended up talking on the phone a lot. She was adopted as well and had been searching for her parents forever, and she was also trying to find some medical history. We are close to the same age, and her kids look like I did when I was their age. Its borderline creepy.

    So far, we can't get much info as the states we have to go through have their own restrictions. I've petitioned my "home" state and haven't received an answer yet. It's being "reviewed". She is in California right now and that place is really wacky with their adoption laws and records.

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    VIP Member Array jmf552's Avatar
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    We used a DNA test for one of my dogs. Turns out she’s related to Elizabeth Warren.
    Last edited by jmf552; August 23rd, 2019 at 07:08 PM. Reason: grammar
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    Distinguished Member Array Novarider's Avatar
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    We've discussed DNA sites sharing info with the FBI before. Not sure if this is the same company.

    I'll never use one of these DNA companies. Some of my siblings have tho.
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    VIP Member Array CG11's Avatar
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    I know me - It would probably be better if I did not know who (or what) I am related to.
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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDW4ME View Post
    I am who I am, don't care about ancestry. (Heck, I avoid potlucks (get togethers) with living extended family)
    I avoid even me.

    All of my ancestors are dead and gone, so there'll be no potlucks for us. I'm moving on, concerning myself with only the living.
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    Distinguished Member Array patkelly4370's Avatar
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    My Grandmothers continued and refined the family trees.
    Moms side back to the 1500's, Dad's side to 1300's. So I know my history.
    I won't willingly submit my DNA to a database. But who knows what happens behind the curtain after lab tests, surgeries, etc.
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    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
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    My wife and I had our DNA tested by two different companies. Hers were a 100% match. Her DNA predicted she was a carrier of a rare genetic disorder which causes medical issues and early death. My wife does have the genetic disorder and is being treated for it.

    One company showed me with 0.0% Native American/Asian. The other company showed me with 0.1% chance of Native American/Asian. Turns out one of my ancestors was a daughter of Chief Powhatan and a sister of Pocahontas.

    Current database information predicts ancestors back to fifth great grandparents. It has filled in several holes in our ancestry trees. My ancestry tree does have branches. Turns out my 12th great-grandfather was Henry VIII and my 13th great-grandmother was a Boleyn and the aunt of Anne Boleyn.

    DNA databases can be used for good or bad. If my wife had a DNA test and found out her genetic issue, it could have saved her years of medical issues without a diagnosis. One doctor finally told her that there was a DNA test for a rare genetic disorder, but he was sure she didn't have it. She did and is being treated for it now.
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    VIP Member Array matthew03's Avatar
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    The gunpowder and lead that has attached itself to my dna would get me on some type of wacko gun registry anyway. NO thanks.
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    flh
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    Then there is this ,

    Serial killer identified by using DNA family tree website

    They tracked him down by comparing samples taken from a crime scene decades ago with genetic profiles of individuals on the GEDmatch database.


    https://www.newscientist.com/article...-tree-website/



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    I am not going to share my DNS again. I shared it both of my kids, and that is it.

    As for my ancestors my Mon assured me that all were humans.
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    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    My wife is well into this. She is adopted and her mother was identified on her adoption papers, Her Father was not. Through DNA she has narrowed her list of possible fathers down to two brothers [ both long ago dead] . She was able to do that because some of their children have also submitted DNA samples. As the technology advances they will learn more and more.

    Now that kind of info is what gets people to submit DNA samples. But what pays these DNA data base company's is the medical info that they derive from it. Drug company's are paying them billions for info like How many family's are likely to pass on certain diseases, How common are this or that disorder, what diseases are up and coming. And it gives them a targeted audience to sell drugs to people who they know are most likely to need that drug. Its market research into what drugs are going to have greater need in the next generation.

    Just like Facebook I'm not in any great hurry to turn over all my market info for them to decide who to sell it to. DR

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    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1942bull View Post
    As for my ancestors my Mon assured me that all were humans.
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