Have you ever seen a coin on a headstone? - Page 2

Have you ever seen a coin on a headstone?

This is a discussion on Have you ever seen a coin on a headstone? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; This might answer your question, scroll down to the tan area. From snopes website COINS LEFT ON TOMBSTONES While visiting some cemeteries you may notice ...

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  1. #16
    Member Array Concealed_in_KY's Avatar
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    This might answer your question, scroll down to the tan area.

    From snopes website

    COINS LEFT ON TOMBSTONES

    While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.

    These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America’s military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

    A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier’s family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.

    A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the soldier when he was killed.

    According to tradition, the money left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.

    In the US, this practice became common during the Vietnam war, due to the political divide in the country over the war; leaving a coin was seen as a more practical way to communicate that you had visited the grave than contacting the soldier’s family, which could devolve into an uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war.

    Some Vietnam veterans would leave coins as a “down payment” to buy their fallen comrades a beer or play a hand of cards when they would finally be reunited.

    The tradition of leaving coins on the headstones of military men and women can be traced to as far back as the Roman Empire.

    [Collected via Facebook, October 2015]

    While “Cleaning of the Stones” at the National Cemetery in Holly. I noticed a quarter placed on one of the stones. Later I also noticed a nickel placed on another stone. I was so touched with this that I took pictures.I googled about the coins, and found this out. I am very proud to share this.

    A coin left on a headstone lets the deceased soldiers family know that somebody stopped by to pay their respect. Leaving a penny means you visited.

    A nickel means that you and the deceased soldier trained at boot camp together. If you served with the soldier, you leave a dime. A quarter is very significant because it means that you were there when that soldier died.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadguy View Post
    When I had a service in Arlington National 3 years ago, I was in the section close to where the Pentagon was hit on 9-11. In that section is a pentagon shaped monument to those killed that day. On top of the monument were about 20 coins left by visitors. Very, very moving.

    In Jewish cemeteries, you will often find rocks placed on the headstones by visitors.
    A symbol that someone has visited the grave of the departed. Flowers are not a part of Jewish funeral/burial traditions, at least where I go.
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  3. #18
    Ex Member Array AzQkr's Avatar
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    I was allowed to place a SAR coin on the casket of a soldier before they lowered it into the ground after the service at Arlington Natl Cemetery. I've heard of the coins being left on grave markers but I haven't visited a cemetery other than Arlington is decades.
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  4. #19
    Member Array denver's Avatar
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    This is the same story an older gentleman told me when I was at the Ft. Stanton cemetery outside of Ruidoso NM. I mentioned the rather large number of quarters on the graves. He laughed and said, " Son, there are a lot of liars in the military". His laugh and the twinkle in his eye was something I will never forget. He had been there!
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  5. #20
    Senior Member Array KILTED COWBOY's Avatar
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    Some of the coins in civilian cemeteries still may be for veterans. Not all Vets are buried in military cemeteries
    My dad is a WW2 vet and he is buried in a civilian cemetery with my mom.
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  6. #21
    VIP Member Array Sister's Avatar
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    Most of my dead relative people are in shoe boxes, so.....
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  7. #22
    Senior Member Array Geezer's Avatar
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    I'm surprised that people haven't noticed the coins. I visited the burial site of Dan Blocker (Hoss Cartwright) in De Kalb Tx, and his headstone was covered on coins - more than I've ever seen at any other cemetery. I always leave coins on Confederate headstones.

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array Sister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geezer View Post
    I'm surprised that people haven't noticed the coins. I visited the burial site of Dan Blocker (Hoss Cartwright) in De Kalb Tx, and his headstone was covered on coins - more than I've ever seen at any other cemetery. I always leave coins on Confederate headstones.



    The ladies in the UDC, we leave flags during different times of the year on some of the Confederate headstones

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  9. #24
    Distinguished Member Array Novarider's Avatar
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    Yes. My mother is buried in a veteran cemetery awaiting my father (who is the veteran) when he passes. Several of the headstones there have coins on them. When I first saw them I was curious, a quick Google search revealed why they were there and the relevance of each coin.

    Incase anyone doesn't know it's very, very cheap to be buried in a veteran cemetery if you (or your spouse) served. Here locally it's $300 and that includes the headstone. It was over $7,000 for two plots at a non veteran cemetery when my mom passed.

    I also found it interesting that both spouses are buried in the same plot. Whomever passes first, get buried. Then when the other passes they exume the plot and place both caskets on top of each other and bury both together. They also put both spouses on the headstone, one on each side. It doesn't matter if only one served both names are on the headstone.
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  10. #25
    Ex Member Array CG11's Avatar
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    Interesting posts, folks. Thanks for the education on this, I did not know.
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  11. #26
    VIP Member Array OldChap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Fish View Post
    [/U][/B]

    This is a Jewish tradition and we usually leave pebbles.
    On Memorial day,my wife and I walk the lines of headstones after the ceremonies and we leave a pebble on any stone with a Star of David.
    We limited it to those because we did not know the tradition for other religions and don't want to offend.
    The "stone of remembrance"? I like image of the shepherd keeping the pebbles in his sling so that he always knows how many sheep he has.

    I've seen them on military graves and those with the Star of David too. I always figured if it was me in that grave that someone, probably Mrs OldChap, would be reminding the world that I had rocks in my head - but I'm sure that is not the reason.
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