Is this really benefiting society- 93 yr old on trial for being 17 yr old SS guard? - Page 7

Is this really benefiting society- 93 yr old on trial for being 17 yr old SS guard?

This is a discussion on Is this really benefiting society- 93 yr old on trial for being 17 yr old SS guard? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Picking and choosing how the law gets applied. There is a common theme here. Follow and enforce the rule of law. Equally, consistently, and evenly. ...

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Thread: Is this really benefiting society- 93 yr old on trial for being 17 yr old SS guard?

  1. #91
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    Picking and choosing how the law gets applied.
    There is a common theme here.

    Follow and enforce the rule of law. Equally, consistently, and evenly. Across the damn board.

    Or ignore it all and end up like social justice hypocrites screaming about their wet panties and bruised feelings. Moronic, immature twits with the emotional age of a 9 year old. "Hey man, it's all good" Ignoring the obvious.

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  2. #92
    Senior Member Array Arejay's Avatar
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    I'm amazed and astounded at those who would shame the Allied powers for bringing an end to a world wide conflagration brought upon all the people of the planet by the Axis alliance.
    They had plenty opportunities to lay their arms down and surrender because it was plain as day their war was lost.
    Fanatical last ditch fighting to the end killed those civilians. They weren't going to surrender. The blood of their people are on their own hands, not ours.
    I don't think there were many people at that time that didn't breathe a huge sigh of relief when the Germans and Japanese crawled out of the rubble and finally surrendered.
    To think it could of been any other way is an alternate view of reality and is very much on the wrong side of history.
    There was a race to build and use those bombs. No one could say with certainty who was going to win that race.

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arejay View Post
    I'm amazed and astounded at those who would shame the Allied powers for bringing an end to a world wide conflagration brought upon all the people of the planet by the Axis alliance.
    They had plenty opportunities to lay their arms down and surrender because it was plain as day their war was lost.
    Fanatical last ditch fighting to the end killed those civilians. They weren't going to surrender. The blood of their people are on their own hands, not ours.
    I don't think there were many people at that time that didn't breathe a huge sigh of relief when the Germans and Japanese crawled out of the rubble and finally surrendered.
    To think it could of been any other way is an alternate view of reality and is very much on the wrong side of history.
    There was a race to build and use those bombs. No one could say with certainty who was going to win that race.
    A interesting case in point is Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese officer who fought on in the Philippines for 29 years after the war was over. His commander, a major, had told him to maintain his post until the major personally relieved him. Onoda continued to conduct raids against local Philippine targets for nearly three decades and the authorities could not catch him.

    Finally, a Japanese explorer went looking for him and found him. But even though the explorer told Onada the war was over, he still wouldn't surrender. The explorer contacted Japanese authorities and they found his commander, the major, who was running a bookstore. They arranged to transport the major to the area. The former major ordered him to stand down and surrender and he did. Onada was pardoned by President Ferdinand Marcos in a ceremony where Onada presented Marcos his sword.

    Amazingly, Onada had kept his rifle, uniform and other equipment clean and in perfect order all that time. Now that's a freakin' soldier.
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  4. #94
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    Try him, and if found guilty, put him under house arrest for the rest of his life. Make him wear an SS insignia, anytime that he is escorted to a doctors appointment.
    The guy is 93 and close to death, and there is not much that can be done. If he is locked up in prison until he dies, then OK, it won't bother me.
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  5. #95
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    I found this thread late since I was away, but knowing about the "Camps" in WWII along with those both German and Japanese, as a young kid I was told the the US had Camps and at first I didn't believe it. But growing up in NYC I had a few Japanese friends, and came to find out that one of my friends Mother, and sort of a "second Mother to me, had actually been interned in one of them. And I guarantee that NO school book in the 1950's and 60's ever mentioned that fact.

    Like there have said, the victor writes the book!
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  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geezer View Post
    As long as they are still breathing, they need to be hunted down and tried. 6,000,000+ souls demand it.
    THIS
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    Kind of odd to debate whether a former SS guard should stand trial for alleged crimes against humanity.

    "Ah well. It was a long time ago. Fuggedaboudit..."
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  8. #98
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    Do the crime, do the time. So yes, absolutely this guy should be prosecuted and jailed if found guilty.
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  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by PEF View Post
    Kind of odd to debate whether a former SS guard should stand trial for alleged crimes against humanity.

    "Ah well. It was a long time ago. Fuggedaboudit..."
    So it's odd to debate whether a 93 year old man should stand trial in juvenile court for crimes he committed at age 17?
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  10. #100
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    The UK is an oddity in that juvenile courts run to 20 year olds and they do not try juveniles as adults. Nonetheless he should be tried regardless of court level...the oddity be damned. He deserves whatever comes his way if he is found guilty.
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  11. #101
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WebleyHunter View Post
    So it's odd to debate whether a 93 year old man should stand trial in juvenile court for crimes he committed at age 17?
    In the US or in Germany?
    We get the government we deserve.

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by WebleyHunter View Post
    So it's odd to debate whether a 93 year old man should stand trial in juvenile court for crimes he committed at age 17?
    I'm not referring German criminal law as it pertains to juvenile status. I'm referring to the question of what benefit there is to society to prosecute a former SS guard for alleged war crimes.

    It is a nihilistic view to let the alleged crime go without trial. The Final Solution was state murder on an industrialized scale. To not prosecute is to accept the view that over time, we're all going to die anyway, so what does it matter if we just pass on this one guy? In a hundred years, no one will care.
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  13. #103
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    It's ironic that people here are arguing that the way German law is structured is unfair in this case. German law during the Third Reich made all the actions or the Nazis regarding the Holocaust legal. The Nazis were meticulous in ensuring laws were passed to support everything they did. Under German law, no Nazi should have ever been prosecuted for anything to do with the extermination of the Jews.

    The Nuremberg trials were conducted by a court that had no jurisdiction and Nazis were convicted of offenses that were not supported by any duly enacted laws. I agree that had to be done, but it is interesting from a legal perspective. Now German law is trying someone for something that was not even illegal at the time he did it. I am on the side that he should be on trial, but at both Nuremberg and now, legal ethics, if there is such a thing, seem to be out the window.
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  14. #104
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    I'm biased. Send him to court. They'll decide if he's guilty of the accusations and if so what the appropriate punishment is.

    Nearly all of my European family members died in WW II, either through fighting or dying in camps. My Dutch grandparents were taken prisoner in Indonesia. When the Japanese took over from Sukarno, Opa was shipped to a POW camp in Tokyo, and pregnant Oma was kept in a POW camp outside Bandung; my mother was born in that camp.

    My grandparents survived, and I learned plenty about how POWs were treated. If this guy is guilty I have zero sympathy; whatever punishment may be doled out pales in comparison to what the Axis enablers did. He was fortunate to live freely for decades before being held accountable, something many victims of the Axis weren't able to do.
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  15. #105
    VIP Member Array jmf552's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    I found this thread late since I was away, but knowing about the "Camps" in WWII along with those both German and Japanese, as a young kid I was told the the US had Camps and at first I didn't believe it. But growing up in NYC I had a few Japanese friends, and came to find out that one of my friends Mother, and sort of a "second Mother to me, had actually been interned in one of them. And I guarantee that NO school book in the 1950's and 60's ever mentioned that fact.

    Like there have said, the victor writes the book!
    My late father, who would be 92 now, was in the Permanent Shore Patrol, which was the Navy's full-time military police in WWII. For a while he was assigned as a guard at a Japanese American internment camp in Hawaii in WWII.

    I think those camps were completely wrong. But there is a huge difference between that camp and Nazi concentration camps. In the US interment camps, no one was murdered or tortured and the internees were generally well cared for. If a US service member had done any of those things, they would have been instantly court martialed. That doesn't excuse the stupid decision to have those camps, but they certainly were not comparable.
    Attack Squadron 65 "Tigers", USS Eisenhower '80 - '83, peackeeping w/Iran, Libya, Lebanon and E. Europe

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