Sleep apnea. - Page 3

Sleep apnea.

This is a discussion on Sleep apnea. within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; In January of last year I was about to change jobs and lose health insurance so I went to a doctor for the first time ...

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  1. #31
    Senior Member Array Walk Soft's Avatar
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    Sleep apnea.

    In January of last year I was about to change jobs and lose health insurance so I went to a doctor for the first time in twenty years. I found I was obese. I knew I was getting a little gut in spite of the physical job I work, but never imagined I would be considered obese. I was told I had high blood pressure and was prediabetic. The doc tried to put me on a couple drugs, but I refused. That day I stopped smoking, stopped eating any processed foods and stopped drinking soda( had been drinking 8-10 Coke’s a day).

    A few months later I had lost +- 40 lbs. You should have seen the doc’s face when he first saw me. He wasn’t there on the second visit so he didn’t see me until the last visit. He said “Well I’ll be damned”.

    Anyway I had taken a sleep study shortly after my first visit and was diagnosed with sleep apnea. So after I lost the weight I took another sleep study. Even after getting to a normal BMI I still had it. I didn’t have the “best sleep ever” experience although I did stop waking up to pee. In fact I hated that machine. Now that I’ve used it for a while, if I Sleep without it I don’t sleep good, constantly waking, tossing and turning in a state of half sleep, going to the bathroom etc..

    So I’ve learned to live with it.
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  2. #32
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    I've been diagnosed with mild sleep apnea. Supposedly they stuck that darn machine on the lowest setting. Have yet to use the machine they saddled me with. Have to be absolutely dead tired, to even try to use it. Then the VA gave me a newer one, saying the old one was out dated. The newer one adjusts pressure. Dont like it either. They said wear it for an hour before you go to sleep, and try to breathe normal. Eventually I might get there. I do know I sleep much better if I take a bit of nyquil, which helps the congestion from my allergies. So, I dont know. Supposedly this sleep apnea is hereditary, too
    All I know is I'd love to tell the doc where to shove his machine.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Apnea about killed me. Finally got tested and got a CPAP. It literally saved my life. Since I've lost weight, I've been able to reduce the setting from 15 to 11 and can, when necessary, sleep without it. But for me, it's every-night use unless the power goes out.
    It makes travel a pain also. Especially air travel.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by NECCdude View Post
    It makes travel a pain also. Especially air travel.
    Not really. A CPAP is considered medical equipment and not counted against carry-on limits. Otherwise, you have to open its carry case, just as you would a laptop or any other piece of electronic gear.
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by graydude View Post
    Hi, my name is graydude, and I have sleep apnea.

    When I went in for my first sleep test people warned me about how awful it was to sleep with all sorts of sensors glued and strapped on.

    In reality, when they put that mask on I had the best sleep I'd had in probably two decades. I woke up more refreshed and mentally alert than I could ever remember.

    The poor tech wasn't sure how to respond when I asked if I could move in.

    I love my ResMed machine as much as my guns.
    CPAPs get bad press, when in fact they are life improvers and live savers. There are some, of course that cannot adapt, but I believe that with expert care and advice, and full exploration of all the machine and mask options, easily most can reach equilibrium just fine, and in short order.

    I call my unit my "sweet dream machine", that's precisely what it is. Before diagnosis and xPAP therapy, my dreams were turbulent, fragmented, and plainly icky. I would wake up in a sweaty mess, just glad to be awake. Now, dreams are user friendly and something to look forward to each night.

    .
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by DZUS View Post
    CPAPs get bad press, when in fact they are life improvers and live savers. There are some, of course that cannot adapt, but I believe that with expert care and advice, and full exploration of all the machine and mask options, easily most can reach equilibrium just fine, and in short order.

    I call my unit my "sweet dream machine", that's precisely what it is. Before diagnosis and xPAP therapy, my dreams were turbulent, fragmented, and plainly icky. I would wake up in a sweaty mess, just glad to be awake. Now, dreams are user friendly and something to look forward to each night.

    .
    I agree, sort of. When I first went on a CPAP, I slept the sleep of the dead--no dreams, no nothing. Closed eyes, woke up 7-8 hours later fully refreshed and raring to go. That lasted about 6-8 months. Don't do that anymore though. My dreams are a tangled mess, never any resolution to any of the predicaments I find myself in.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I agree, sort of. When I first went on a CPAP, I slept the sleep of the dead--no dreams, no nothing. Closed eyes, woke up 7-8 hours later fully refreshed and raring to go. That lasted about 6-8 months. Don't do that anymore though. My dreams are a tangled mess, never any resolution to any of the predicaments I find myself in.
    Sending you a PM OV.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Workaholic View Post
    I've been diagnosed with mild sleep apnea. Supposedly they stuck that darn machine on the lowest setting. Have yet to use the machine they saddled me with. Have to be absolutely dead tired, to even try to use it. Then the VA gave me a newer one, saying the old one was out dated. The newer one adjusts pressure. Dont like it either. They said wear it for an hour before you go to sleep, and try to breathe normal. Eventually I might get there. I do know I sleep much better if I take a bit of nyquil, which helps the congestion from my allergies. So, I dont know. Supposedly this sleep apnea is hereditary, too
    All I know is I'd love to tell the doc where to shove his machine.
    Quote Originally Posted by DZUS View Post
    CPAPs get bad press, when in fact they are life improvers and live savers. There are some, of course that cannot adapt, but I believe that with expert care and advice, and full exploration of all the machine and mask options, easily most can reach equilibrium just fine, and in short order.

    I call my unit my "sweet dream machine", that's precisely what it is. Before diagnosis and xPAP therapy, my dreams were turbulent, fragmented, and plainly icky. I would wake up in a sweaty mess, just glad to be awake. Now, dreams are user friendly and something to look forward to each night.

    .

    After my sleep study indicating severe sleep apnea, I was fitted with a machine and mask. I tried really hard for about 6 months to adapt, including trying new masks etc. I read everything I could find about sticking with it and getting it to work for me. I ultimately gave up. About 6 months later, my health insurance changed, requiring me to get a new physician and a different medical center. In speaking to my new doctor, he suggested I give CPAP another try because of its importance to my long term health.

    I met a sleep tech at the new sleep center and he was AWESOME! He set me up with a new machine and his “go-to” sleep mask for patients having issues adapting to CPAP. Almost immediately, my life changed. I was able to sleep with the new system within a few days. Been successfully using my CPAP now for about 10 years. I have a few issues every so often, but without my CPAP, I just don’t sleep well. And neither does my wife. In addition to improving my health, it likely saved my marriage.

    It may take a lot of effort, but it’s worth it for long term health. Work with your sleep doctor/technician, and don’t give up. If you don’t feel they are doing everything they can for you....get another doctor. It’s YOUR life, and you need to be a big part of the solution. You just need the some quality assistance.
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  9. #39
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    For those who have milder sleep apnea, a dental appliance might be a better option than a CPAP. It's pretty much no more intrusive than wearing a night guard. Mine doesn't bother me at all, and my wife says I've stopped snoring.

  10. #40
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    Okay folks, getting DEADLY serious here. Sleep apnea killed my dad. I was diagnosed in 1994 and had a difficult time at FIRST with my CPAP machine, but now and have since the end of that first month in 1994 I haven't missed a night.

    Sometimes when I wake up and the machine is breathing for me, I fell like I'm floating between Heaven and Earth. I have been through countless machines as the upgrades in technology come along and the V.A. issues me the new machine.

    It's the most amazing feeling in the world. I have no qualms in saying that I firmly believe that the CPAP saved my marriage. Some of the new doo-dads that I really like are the slimmer nose pillow masks and lightweight head strap rigs.
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExSoldier View Post
    Okay folks, getting DEADLY serious here. Sleep apnea killed my dad. I was diagnosed in 1994 and had a difficult time at FIRST with my CPAP machine, but now and have since the end of that first month in 1994 I haven't missed a night.

    Sometimes when I wake up and the machine is breathing for me, I fell like I'm floating between Heaven and Earth. I have been through countless machines as the upgrades in technology come along and the V.A. issues me the new machine.

    It's the most amazing feeling in the world. I have no qualms in saying that I firmly believe that the CPAP saved my marriage. Some of the new doo-dads that I really like are the slimmer nose pillow masks and lightweight head strap rigs.
    I wanted to like this twice......
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    I’ve had, and used, a CPAP machine for just 4 months or so. The one night I didn’t use it, I slept very poorly. My problem is getting up. I get awful comfy with a good nights sleep and prefer wiggling my toes to hitting the deck. Snoring is only a side effect to sleep apnea. Not breathing is a worse gamble than Tide pods. If you think you need testing, put the ego aside, make your wife happy, take care of yourself, go get tested. The mouth guard thing helps snoring but does nothing when you shut down breathing in the middle of the night.

    When the revolution comes and the power goes out for the last time, we’ll go back to snoring and maybe wake up dead from oxygen deprivation but until then........
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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by DZUS View Post
    Sending you a PM OV.
    (I got mail! That's almost better than a Christmas card!)
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Not really. A CPAP is considered medical equipment and not counted against carry-on limits. Otherwise, you have to open its carry case, just as you would a laptop or any other piece of electronic gear.
    Yeah I know. I still consider it to be a hassle because it makes it a little difficult to travel light. Suitcase(s), laptop(s), firearm(s), CPAP.......
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  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExSoldier View Post
    Okay folks, getting DEADLY serious here. Sleep apnea killed my dad. I was diagnosed in 1994 and had a difficult time at FIRST with my CPAP machine, but now and have since the end of that first month in 1994 I haven't missed a night.

    Sometimes when I wake up and the machine is breathing for me, I fell like I'm floating between Heaven and Earth. I have been through countless machines as the upgrades in technology come along and the V.A. issues me the new machine.

    It's the most amazing feeling in the world. I have no qualms in saying that I firmly believe that the CPAP saved my marriage. Some of the new doo-dads that I really like are the slimmer nose pillow masks and lightweight head strap rigs.
    I lost my Mom when she was still relatively young (59) and I'm certain that undiagnosed sleep apnea played a role. One of the secondary effects of sleep apnea is a degradation of the apneic's immune system, and if a bad virus comes their way, there is less in the biological arsenal to fight the bug.

    As a related point, I noticed that after my diagnosis and start of xPAP therapy, I've had fewer colds and when I did get them, they were milder my coughs were milder and shorter duration.
    graydude likes this.
    Armed And Harmless
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    - - Sir Winston Churchill, 1941

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