Change a safe lock? - Page 2

Change a safe lock?

This is a discussion on Change a safe lock? within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by StripesDude I’ve considered doing the opposite - either getting a safe with a manual combination or swapping out the lock. If there’s ...

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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by StripesDude View Post
    I’ve considered doing the opposite - either getting a safe with a manual combination or swapping out the lock. If there’s an electrical surge (EMP), an electronic lock gets fried.
    My little safe has an electronic lock but it also can be opened with a key which I keep in the big safe that has a mechanical lock.
    Instymp and RETSUPT99 like this.
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  2. #17
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    Not willing to test it.
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  3. #18
    Member Array montejames's Avatar
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    All Vault Pro Safes and Vault Doors with Sargent and Greenleaf Electronic Locks Are Now EMP Resistant.

    Resistant??
    .
    .
    Monte

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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Struckat View Post
    I bought a safe for my kid. Knew exactly what I wanted, but the sales weasel insisted that I needed digital. I refused so I think he jinxed me as I often have to do the combo twice on my safe to get it open.
    Try a different set of numbers...

    I've had that happen with S&Gs and it turns out that some combinations of numbers, just don't work well together. Back in the day I was involved with the nuclear program for a couple of units I was in (Field Artillery). IF there's one thing I know, it's how to open an S&G lock. Also I currently work in a secure facility with the same basic locks. So we're talking an everyday deal opening S&Gs. My current vault door was a PITA, sometimes 2-3 tries to get it open. I was actually at the point of calling a locksmith, when I did some Googling and just changed the combo myself. New series of numbers, zero issues.
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  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by montejames View Post
    All Vault Pro Safes and Vault Doors with Sargent and Greenleaf Electronic Locks Are Now EMP Resistant.

    Resistant??
    Read the article. They can't say EMP proof just like everything is water resistant instead of waterproof now.

    "To address this concern, S&G put its Spartan, Titan and 6100 series electromechanical locks to the test, choosing the three specifically because of their prevalence in consumer gun-safes across a wide range of manufacturers. All three were tested at high-EMP levels in the same independent lab where S&G tests the U.S. government’s high-security 2740B locks against EMP “attacks.”


    Generally, EMP-resistance requirements for electromechanical locks that protect the nation’s most classified documents only requires successfully passing testing at an EMP level of between 28 and 37 kV/m exposure.


    S&G’s study¸ however, went beyond the standard testing and used an EMP exposure at levels of 50 kV/m – the U.S. military’s highest EMP impact standard as found in MIL-STD 461F, Method RS105. The lab tested all three lock series, applying radiant transient electromagnet field, and each were tested with a variety of S&G keypads, following the Military Standard MILSTD461F, Method RS105 at 50 kV/m peak exposure.


    At the end of the testing series, the S&G locks were still fully functional. S&G credits the locks’ resilience to the expertise S&G engineers have applied from working with high-security locks for U.S. government facilities."
    Stirling XD and RETSUPT99 like this.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array FAS1's Avatar
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    I would suggest that you keep a defensive gun available that is not in an electronic locking container for reliability reasons if you decide to go with the electronic lock on your safe. I have a good friend that is a lock tech. He has a very nice paid for Bay Boat that he credits to repairing/replacing electronic locks on RSC gun safes. He loves electronic locks, but won't own one himself.

    When an electronic lock fails (and they fail way more often still today then mechanical) they usually don't give any warning. When a mechanical lock has an issue you usually have some indication that something isn't quite right and you can have it serviced without it failing. You just have to understand the shortcomings and make sure you have what you need for a primary defensive weapon available just in case.

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by FAS1 View Post
    I would suggest that you keep a defensive gun available that is not in an electronic locking container for reliability reasons if you decide to go with the electronic lock on your safe. I have a good friend that is a lock tech. He has a very nice paid for Bay Boat that he credits to repairing/replacing electronic locks on RSC gun safes. He loves electronic locks, but won't own one himself.

    When an electronic lock fails (and they fail way more often still today then mechanical) they usually don't give any warning. When a mechanical lock has an issue you usually have some indication that something isn't quite right and you can have it serviced without it failing. You just have to understand the shortcomings and make sure you have what you need for a primary defensive weapon available just in case.
    We keep guns out of it for use so it wouldn't be opened in an emergency situation.
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  9. #23
    New Member Array Gregfosterid's Avatar
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    What do you think of safes with fingerprint sensor?

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregfosterid View Post
    What do you think of safes with fingerprint sensor?
    Unreliable
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  11. #25
    Distinguished Member Array MB53's Avatar
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    I had a digital lock gun safe for many years. Then one day the digital mechanism died and despite every possible effort to 'crack the safe' I ended up having to rent an industrial grade grinder with a 10" cutting disc and cut thru the door to get into it.
    The old safe went to the scrap yard and I bought a new one with a dial lock. Have never once had to fidget with it to get it open.
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  12. #26
    New Member Array Gregfosterid's Avatar
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    Ok, I understand you.
    And can you tell, please, what exactly is unreliable a digital lock?

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