Crimp Die

Crimp Die

This is a discussion on Crimp Die within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I am looking for a Crimp Die for 9mm and am looking for feedback on the Lee Factory Crimp Die vs the Dillon Crimp Die. ...

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Thread: Crimp Die

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array BlackJack's Avatar
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    Crimp Die

    I am looking for a Crimp Die for 9mm and am looking for feedback on the Lee Factory Crimp Die vs the Dillon Crimp Die.

    I have the RCBS 3 Die Carbide Die set and am looking to add a crimp die so that I can seat and crimp separately. I am in the process of moving from a Lee Classic Turret to a Dillon 550 and am having mixed results seating and crimping in the same station so I decided it was time to split them into two separate steps.

    Which one, and why?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
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    Lee inexpensive. Dillon expensive. They both crimp. I guess it's a matter of how much you want to spend. I always seat and crimp in one step. It's a matter of die setup. I have a Lee FCD but never use it.
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  3. #3
    Nix
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    I seat and crimp with my single stage (.41, .44, .45), but seat and crimp in two stages with my Dillon (.357, .45). I can't say I notice a big difference, but the Dillon seems to do a great job.

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    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    I learned to reload before the crimp die was a thing. I am careful to adjust my dies, and lock them down. I have not found any need for that fourth die. When I was loading for bulls eye matches [ Middle son was shooting] I uniformed 1000 cases for him. Those were so easy to load and had such nice uniform crimps. Maybe if I wasn't using uniform brass I would have seen the benefit of a separate crimp die. DR

  6. #5
    Distinguished Member Array Shootnlead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dangerranger View Post
    I learned to reload before the crimp die was a thing. I am careful to adjust my dies, and lock them down. I have not found any need for that fourth die. DR
    Same here...it is not really necessary.
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    I had problems with a single die both seating and crimping at one station for .45 and 9mm. I now use separate dies for those functions, and would not go backwards.
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    I prefer using the Lee Factory Crimp Die. I like how it uses a 4 jaw collet to squeeze he neck. Smoothes out the case and just makes nice tightly seated rounds and I like that for hot loads. I guess it is not necessary, just what I have always done.
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  9. #8
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    For my revolvers, I really like the Lee Factory Crimp die which seems to do a better job than the others. With revolver, I do like a separate crimp die because I like a good strong roll crimp for what is usually a healthy dose of slow powder. For autoloads, I'm only concerned with fully removing the bell on the case mouth, a crimp per se, is not needed or desired because autoloaders headspace on the case mouth. Since the bell is only needed until the bullet has started into the case mouth, once the bullet begins to slide into the case, it does no harm removing the bell anytime after the bullet has started into the case.
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    I like using the Lee Factory Crimp die on my 38 and 44 loads.

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    First, I want to thank everybody for their input. After reading the replies, I began to remember what I went through when I moved from a single stage to a turret press.

    I started out on an RCBS Rock Chucker with RCBS Dies for 9mm, 45 ACP, 223 Rem and 308 Win. When I moved to a turret, I decided to go with the Lee Classic Turret and had nothing but trouble trying to get the RCBS dies adjusted. I ended up getting Lee dies for 9mm to see if it made any difference. Well, the Lee dies worked like a charm and seating and crimping in the same stage was a non-issue. As a result, I just went to Lee dies across the board thinking that RCBS dies just didn’t work well with the Lee press.

    When I decided to move to the Dillon, I decided to use the RCBS dies that I already had and leave the tool head setup for the turret in case I ever wanted to use it again. After remembering why the RCBS dies were sitting there unused, I decided to setup the Lee dies on the 550. After setting up and adjusting the dies, I did a batch of 100 rounds, stopping every 10 rounds to do a plunk test to see how things were going. Well, every single round dropped right in without issue. With the RCBS dies I was lucky to get 90% of my rounds to pass the plunk test no matter how I adjusted them.

    I recall thinking that the RCBS dies just did not work well in the Lee Classic Turret Press, but now that they have not worked well in the Dillon 550 as well, I am now thinking that one of the dies has an issue. Not sure whether it is the sizing die or the seating/crimping die, but I am leaning towards the sizing die.

    In any case, I “think” my problem is solved, but I will wait until I have gotten this batch of rounds out to the range and then loaded a couple hundred more rounds before I will happy with it.

    Thanks again for all your input!
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  12. #11
    Distinguished Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    Good luck. FWIW, I seat and crimp bullets separately (I used to be a one step guy, but occasionally was running into issues with 10 mm) but went to a crimp die for all of my pistol loading. Most of my crimp dies are Lee and they have never been a problem (used on a Hornady progressive). Just do what works best for you.
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackJack View Post
    First, I want to thank everybody for their input. After reading the replies, I began to remember what I went through when I moved from a single stage to a turret press.

    I started out on an RCBS Rock Chucker with RCBS Dies for 9mm, 45 ACP, 223 Rem and 308 Win. When I moved to a turret, I decided to go with the Lee Classic Turret and had nothing but trouble trying to get the RCBS dies adjusted. I ended up getting Lee dies for 9mm to see if it made any difference. Well, the Lee dies worked like a charm and seating and crimping in the same stage was a non-issue. As a result, I just went to Lee dies across the board thinking that RCBS dies just didn’t work well with the Lee press.

    When I decided to move to the Dillon, I decided to use the RCBS dies that I already had and leave the tool head setup for the turret in case I ever wanted to use it again. After remembering why the RCBS dies were sitting there unused, I decided to setup the Lee dies on the 550. After setting up and adjusting the dies, I did a batch of 100 rounds, stopping every 10 rounds to do a plunk test to see how things were going. Well, every single round dropped right in without issue. With the RCBS dies I was lucky to get 90% of my rounds to pass the plunk test no matter how I adjusted them.

    I recall thinking that the RCBS dies just did not work well in the Lee Classic Turret Press, but now that they have not worked well in the Dillon 550 as well, I am now thinking that one of the dies has an issue. Not sure whether it is the sizing die or the seating/crimping die, but I am leaning towards the sizing die.

    In any case, I “think” my problem is solved, but I will wait until I have gotten this batch of rounds out to the range and then loaded a couple hundred more rounds before I will happy with it.

    Thanks again for all your input!
    Your post is a bit confusing. It does not sound like you ever put the RCBS dies in your Dillon (first bolded part). But the 2nd bolded part sounds like you did?

    At any rate, I had an RCBS progressive press for many years, with RCBS dies. When I switched to a Dillon 650, I used the RCBS dies I already owned. All the dies work perfectly on both presses. I seriously have no idea why anyone would want to set depth and crimp on different stations, given how well mine works for everything from 9mm to 44 mag. I'd suggest calling RCBS and make sure you are setting up the die correctly, or if you have a bad die. Their customer support is just awesome, so well worth a call.

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    I had problems with a single die both seating and crimping at one station for .45 and 9mm. I now use separate dies for those functions, and would not go backwards.
    Same here, especially when dealing with cast bullets. I now use separate seating and crimp dies.

    It also makes it a lot easier to tune a load. I can adjust the amount of crimp, without screwing up my seating depth.
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  15. #14
    VIP Member Array Bigsteve113's Avatar
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    I have had a lot of success with the Lee FCD. I have had loads that were unreliable in my autos or iffy fitting in the cylinders of some revolvers. A pass through the appropriate Lee FCD has always fixed the issue and brought everything into spec for me.
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