wanting to start reloading - Page 2

wanting to start reloading

This is a discussion on wanting to start reloading within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Get more than one manual. It's a good idea to have a paper book on the bench. The manuals are full of related information. (You ...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 41
Like Tree97Likes

Thread: wanting to start reloading

  1. #16
    Member Array montejames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    182
    Get more than one manual. It's a good idea to have a paper book on the bench. The manuals are full of related information.

    (You can download a bunch of factory data from online the sites provided by the component manufacturers.)

    Start slow. Going fast in the beginning is going to cause mistakes. Triple check your work often in the beginning.

    If your like most of us you will not save a lot of money. You'll shoot more and pay less per shot.


    What I've found after 40+ years of "reloading handloads"

    What ever you think you'll need, it's not enough.

    Another tool might do it better.

    More space would make it better.

    Another thing is going to do it faster and that's going to be better

    Better costs money.
    .
    .
    Monte

    "I'll huff and I'll puff ...woah! Nice shotgun. Umm. Look at the time! Should have been home hours ago! Wife will be frantic. Nice meeting you. Bye, bye now!"

  2. #17
    Member Array Workaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    408
    I'm ok with starting slow with one caliber. Ideally, I want to be able to reload enough to be able to shoot every weekend, as well as possibly 1-2 times a month in say aspsa or idpa competitions. That puts the numbers at say 200-250 for each competition, and at least 100-150 per weekend, at least at first. I figure this easily puts me at about 1000 or more rounds a month. This is where the savings would come in, primer, powder, bullet, would run me about $0.18 per round, using offhand numbers from Cabelas website. I'm well aware that I could get things down even further by going elsewhere for components.

    Competitions are not a must at this point. They are a want, a possible eventuality. With the figures above, it should knock my ammo cost from $400 a month down to $180, after the initial cost is amortized. Heck, even just making it to the range for 50-100 rounds a weekend would make me happy at this point.

    I really appreciate all the responses so far. Any other advice or recommendations are more than welcome. I kind of feel like I'm a bit over my head with this, but I know, once I make the decision on which press, and get things set up, a logical and deliberate approach will reap rewards in good ammo, cheaper than what I can buy it for. Thanks.
    bmcgilvray likes this.
    1987-1991 Army Guard/Regular Army
    1996-2014 Navy- Retired

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    7,731
    I personally do not see the value of “starting out” with a single stage press. Single stage presses have their used, but whether you are loading on a single stage, turret, or a progressive, the process is exactly the same. You can go as slow as you want with any of them, but with a single stage you will never be able to load quickly. Presses like the lee turret or Dillon 550 that manually index can be used one station at a time, which would basically be the same as using a single stage, but without having to change dies, but also giving you the oppprtunity to pick up the pace when you don’t want it to take forever. I started out with a lee turret, and for what I load, knowing what I know now, if I were to to it all over again I’d buy the same thing. I don’t regret not starting out with a single stage in the slightest bit. Unless loading for precision ammo there is no advantage to having a single stage over the turret.

    As far as being in over tour head, everyone probably feels like it at this point. Buy something like the Lyman manual and read through the process. You can also find videos on YouTube of people setting up presses and loading ammo on them. Once you start loading you will see that it’s really easy.
    Workaholic likes this.
    a poor plan that is well executed will produce better results that a good plan that is poorly executed.

    This is America. I have the right to go places. You have the right to stay home. You have the right to be upset about me going places. I have the right to not care.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    DefensiveCarry.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #19
    VIP Member Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    The Florida Twilight Zone
    Posts
    33,422
    Quote Originally Posted by Havok View Post
    I personally do not see the value of “starting out” with a single stage press.
    The primary value in starting with a SS press, IMO, is that if it turns out reloading is not for you, for whatever reason, you're not stuck with unloading an expensive reloading setup to recoup your investment. It's not for everyone, and until one tries it, one never knows.
    Retired USAF E-8. Curmudgeon on the loose.
    Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your life it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  6. #20
    Senior Member Array Grizzly2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    851
    Everyone has commented on scales saying 2 is one and 1 is none or something like that.. Get that little set of weights so that you can calibrate your scale and be certain that it is accurate and still reads true. Not a necessity but something nice to pick up later.

    I'm still using my Dad's beam scale made by BAIR which may not even still be in business any more, but it has served both of us well for over 60 years.
    MACV Advisory Team 75, HQ in My Tho at the Seminary. 1967-1969

  7. #21
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    7,731
    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    The primary value in starting with a SS press, IMO, is that if it turns out reloading is not for you, for whatever reason, you're not stuck with unloading an expensive reloading setup to recoup your investment. It's not for everyone, and until one tries it, one never knows.
    That’s definitely valid, although the turret presses are still priced similarly.
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly2 View Post
    Everyone has commented on scales saying 2 is one and 1 is none or something like that.. Get that little set of weights so that you can calibrate your scale and be certain that it is accurate and still reads true. Not a necessity but something nice to pick up later.

    I'm still using my Dad's beam scale made by BAIR which may not even still be in business any more, but it has served both of us well for over 60 years.
    To me the value of a second scale has more to do with ensuring the charges are weighed correctly each time. If for some reason your beam scale gets knocked off the right weight, or it gets move a little and is no longer level, or with a digital if your phone gets too close to it, etc. I have a check weight for my digital scale that I have used every time it gets turned on.
    Workaholic likes this.
    a poor plan that is well executed will produce better results that a good plan that is poorly executed.

    This is America. I have the right to go places. You have the right to stay home. You have the right to be upset about me going places. I have the right to not care.

  8. #22
    Senior Member Array Grizzly2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    851
    If you are going to shoot matches frequently, you will spend alot of time at the bench with a single state. If like me now in later years you just shoot when you want to head to the range, then a single stage is fine. My progressive is sitting idle though I may fire it up again to load a bunch of .45 acp rounds since I have the supplies. Those progressives are very handy and save you time for the family when your shooting becomes much more frequent. If you shoot many matches, you also shoot more in practice and that takes time to load. With the progressive, once all set up, each crank of the handle drops a loaded round into the tray. The other hand is kept busy putting a bullet into a case. You only stop to refill powder and primers or clear up a jam. I've so far never double filled a case with powder. they say it's easier with a progressive, though I've never had that happen. I've stopped a time or two to weigh a powder charge if in doubt - or just to make sure the powder is still dropping the correct charge.

    Single stage is just that. You spend more time checking things as you go along. This is really not a hobby to allow yourself to get too distracted by other things while you are reloading cases. In time you will relax more but still keep yourself aware of what is happening. I've always enjoyed it and still do, yet I never forget the dangers. One of the salesmen at a lgs showed us a Ruger single action he blew the cylinder apart on. He didn't know what he did wrong. Did he start loading magnum charges with his fast burning target powder, drastically increasing pressures and not realize this? Did he leave some fast burning powder in this powder measure and then drop slow burning powder on top of it? Did he double charge a case? Did he store some powder he'd saved from taking some old rounds apart and not marked it and then forgot what he had? A bad idea by the way. Did he get creative and try to increase velocity or power and not follow the proven and tested loads in the manuals? Did he copy someones load on line that has never been tested for pressure? Did he reload some rounds from memory that were not in the manual?
    These are the things to pay attention to and avoid doing.

    The fun part is as the years go by you acquire "stuff". For instance, when I bought my first .44 Special a year ago, I already had some brass someone left on the range over 20 years ago that I put away for just such a rainy day as now. I had both jacketed and lead bullets from my .44 magnum years and still had boxes of large primers still on the shelf. My powder supply had gone low because of years of switching to a much quieter pastime with a bow and traditional archery, but I had enough to load a few hundred rounds until I picked up some more.

    Just research like you are doing and buy something of quality now and it should last you a lifetime, save you some money and allow you to still shoot when the rounds you may want are not on the shelves.
    bmcgilvray and Workaholic like this.
    MACV Advisory Team 75, HQ in My Tho at the Seminary. 1967-1969

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array Grizzly2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    851
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly2 View Post
    Everyone has commented on scales saying 2 is one and 1 is none or something like that.. Get that little set of weights so that you can calibrate your scale and be certain that it is accurate and still reads true. Not a necessity but something nice to pick up later.

    I'm still using my Dad's beam scale made by BAIR which may not even still be in business any more, but it has served both of us well for over 60 years.
    Quote Origianlly Posted by Havok: To me the value of a second scale has more to do with ensuring the charges are weighed correctly each time. If for some reason your beam scale gets knocked off the right weight, or it gets move a little and is no longer level, or with a digital if your phone gets too close to it, etc. I have a check weight for my digital scale that I have used every time it gets turned on.
    Agreed. That's why I mentioned having a set of weights. I suppose it's a good idea to have two scales, but I never did buy a second. When I bought prizes for our monthly shoots, I got those little weights once to give away. Very handy to have.
    Workaholic likes this.
    MACV Advisory Team 75, HQ in My Tho at the Seminary. 1967-1969

  10. #24
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    7,731
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly2 View Post
    Agreed. That's why I mentioned having a set of weights. I suppose it's a good idea to have two scales, but I never did buy a second. When I bought prizes for our monthly shoots, I got those little weights once to give away. Very handy to have.
    I usually only use one. But I do like having a second one in case something seems off, or if I’m working up a new load, I use my beam and digital, but that is more of an extra check on me in case I adjust my scale wrong going from one load to the next.
    Workaholic likes this.
    a poor plan that is well executed will produce better results that a good plan that is poorly executed.

    This is America. I have the right to go places. You have the right to stay home. You have the right to be upset about me going places. I have the right to not care.

  11. #25
    VIP Member Array Glock2201's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    2,766
    I bought a Hornady Lock and Load progressive press a few years back and I like it a lot. Between Cabelas points and gift cards that I had received as gifts I only had to come up with a little bit of cash. I already had a single stage press and misc. equipment and dies I bartered for a few years before that. I looked at that the Lee progressive press and almost bought it but opted for the Hornady. The thing that has to be considered with a progressive is that shell plates are around $40. Looking at the pistol calibers you look to reload you would need at least 4. Not sure if the 38 super would use the same as some of the other calibers you are looking at. With a singe stage the shell holders are less than $10 and some brands of dies include them. I do not own a RCBS rock chucker but used one to load a lot of rounds when I was growing up and that one brand that has loaded a lot of rounds for a lot of different people.

    My best suggestion is do research and look at reviews. There are a lot of videos on you tube you can watch as well.
    Workaholic likes this.

  12. #26
    VIP Member Array flintlock62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    4,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Workaholic View Post
    i have been weighing this idea for several years. it seems now, things are falling into place for me to be able to shoot more. quite a bit more, if i reload. so, i need to know what i need, bare minimum. most of what i reload will be pistol calibers. 40 s&w/10mm, 38spl/357mag, 9mm, 45acp, 38 super. some of these pistols i have now, some are future acquisitions. i want to be set up, and able to go, so all i have to do is acquire components and dies, for each new caliber. eventually, a few rifle rounds will be added as well.

    side note, upon cruising the interwebs today, i found a source for some ammo for my 8mm roth-steyr, and (AND!) dies and shell holder!

    what i'm trying to figure out, is what i need, and what can wait. i will be purchasing through either Amazon, or Cabella's. the reason for this, is i have "appreciation zone" points at work, that can be turned into real dollars. with this being the season for my larger amount of "fun money" (as the wife calls it), i can take a bit out of my new gun and ammo budget, to get things rolling, if i need to. i'd honestly not have to take any more out of it than i absolutely have to.

    as such, at the moment, i'm looking at a turret, or single stage system, to get me started. i'd honestly prefer a turret, as i can use it either way. the budget is tight. about $350 without dipping into my "fun money". so, i need advice.

    thois is one i'm looking at. obviously, it will take a couple hundred cash, on top of my awards money:
    https://www.cabelas.com/product/shoo...8.uts?slotId=4

    then there's this:
    https://www.cabelas.com/product/shoo...5.uts?slotId=6

    the first one i listed seems to have about everything i need. not sure though. i've tried reading through posts at castboolits. even though i'm somewhat familiar with the process of reloading shotshells, some of what i run into there is a bit over my head. i've read the front parts of a reloading manual several times, and understand the process, as well as i can without actually using any equipment. i have no problem going slow at first, and then as i get more experienced, being able to speed up the process. i may even have a source for some tutoring. i do not have a dedicated space for a reloading bench at this time. this does mean, and i'm aware of this, that i will need to bolt the press onto a 2x6 or some such, and then c clamp it to either the breakfast bar or dining room table, in order to work. that's not a problem for me. i leave it up to you fine gentlemen and ladies, to give me some good advice to move forward on. and help would be more than greatly appreciated. thanks.
    Have you decided yet? I suggest a Dillon 550C Yes, it costs slightly more, but with the calibers you suggested, if you shoot a lot, you will make your money back quickly. (9mm isn't worth the trouble). I have quick change sets which allows me to keep all the dies tuned. Something one can't do with a single stage so easily. I load .357. 40 S&W, 45acp, and 45 Colt. Believe me, if you shoot a lot as I do, a Dillon 550C is a no brainer. Will you save money? Yes. Will will shoot a bunch more, but NOT save money because you are shooting more? YES! Except for 9mm, you can save about 50% or more over factory ammo. Learn to cast your own bullets and you can save even more.
    Havok, hogdaddy and Workaholic like this.
    NRA lifetime member

    Flint

  13. #27
    VIP Member Array Havok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    7,731
    Quote Originally Posted by flintlock62 View Post
    Have you decided yet? I suggest a Dillon 550C Yes, it costs slightly more, but with the calibers you suggested, if you shoot a lot, you will make your money back quickly. (9mm isn't worth the trouble). I have quick change sets which allows me to keep all the dies tuned. Something one can't do with a single stage so easily. I load .357. 40 S&W, 45acp, and 45 Colt. Believe me, if you shoot a lot as I do, a Dillon 550C is a no brainer. Will you save money? Yes. Will will shoot a bunch more, but NOT save money because you are shooting more? YES! Except for 9mm, you can save about 50% or more over factory ammo. Learn to cast your own bullets and you can save even more.
    Do you have seperate powder measured for each caliber or do you just use one?
    Workaholic likes this.
    a poor plan that is well executed will produce better results that a good plan that is poorly executed.

    This is America. I have the right to go places. You have the right to stay home. You have the right to be upset about me going places. I have the right to not care.

  14. #28
    VIP Member Array Bad Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    The BAD lands
    Posts
    12,661
    I have an RCBS RS2 and a pile of dies that I have been using since the early 1980's. Just keep buying more dies.
    Check out the CR-12 - wilkinsontactical.com

  15. #29
    Senior Member
    Array KevinRohrer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Medina, Ohio
    Posts
    929
    This has been asked many times.

    Goto Ebay and buy something used, not Lee. Anything else will outlast you. Start slow and work up to a Dillon.
    Workaholic likes this.
    Member: Orange Gunsite Family, NRA--Life, American Legion
    "Laws are nothing more than guidelines for honest citizens to follow. Criminals care nothing for laws or their consequences, or the Police or Courts. Getting caught is nothing more to them than a minor inconvenience".--Me

  16. #30
    VIP Member Array MMinSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    charleston,sc
    Posts
    3,902
    What I have is what my father-in-law gave me mostly. He shot bullseye and hunted but handed everything over to me as he slowly stopped shooting center fire. I have an old seventies vintage Redding single stage that must way 35 pounds and is made from cast iron. Big and solid. Powder is done with the Redding Match Grade. That one is a dream to use and very very precise. They are almost $200 so it is not something I would have purchased, but I would highly recommend it to anyone that had that budget for a measure. I probably have 40 sets of dies as he reloaded for his whole family and many friends.

    That is a great setup of quality stuff. One of the things I added was a Lee hand press. Nice to sit outside or on the couch and resize or flare cases, things you can concentrate a little less.

    As i stated, I did not choose the setup. Probably if it was my money, I would go with a Lee Turret or the new Lee Auto(that looks like the turret). I am fine with single stage. I just do batches of 1000 or so. Takes some time, but I can do some on the press, maybe sit and prime all 1000 on the couch, etc. I appreciate the simpleness of single stage reloading. No fiddling with anything. I might be weird though. I have always admired the Forster Co-ax which is IMO, a lot of money just to load slowly. The design is really neat and it takes the "simple" that I like a few steps further.

    One thing I would like, maybe someone here has a suggestion is a better primer. Perhaps one of the bench mounted ones.

    Another thing I sorta collect in vintage form but only sometimes use, those old Lee Loaders where you hammer out your ammo. i think it is pretty cool how something so basic with just a few parts, a hammer and a scoop can make some very good ammo.
    bmcgilvray and Workaholic like this.
    It takes a Viking to raze a village.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •