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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone carries their 1911 cocked but with the thumb safety off. With the beaver tail safety there and if you kept the trigger on the heavy side, I'm wondering if that's safety enough. I know it's single action and all but asking anyway.
 

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A 1911 is designed to be carried cocked and locked, period. Carry cocked and unlocked, please do it far from other people.
 

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When I carry my 1911, I carry it cocked and locked. Better safe than sorry.
 

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Emmmm, doesn't that thumb safety have something to do with the hammer not falling and the firing pin not hitting the primer in the event of the hammer falling by some quirk of fate. The Grip safety maybe just has something to do with the trigger pull and not allowing that to happen if its not made. I'm not sure, just can't figure out how anyone could carry a 1911 w/o the thing locked. I get confused like that a lot as I've gotten older. Maybe its because I've seen someone hit with a 45 acp and what it did. I'm afraid of it myself and would never carry it w/o full safe condition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm looking to venture into the brave world of John Moses Browning. I have zero experience with 1911's but love how they look and their history.

So I'm guessing you just have to practice like crazy to make the thumb safety swipe a natural part of your draw stroke. Was wondering what the minimum you could get away with. Makes sense what everyone's saying.
 

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I'm looking to venture into the brave world of John Moses Browning. I have zero experience with 1911's but love how they look and their history.

So I'm guessing you just have to practice like crazy to make the thumb safety swipe a natural part of your draw stroke. Was wondering what the minimum you could get away with. Makes sense what everyone's saying.

That is exactly right. Practice until it becomes automatic...
 

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I'm looking to venture into the brave world of John Moses Browning. I have zero experience with 1911's but love how they look and their history.

So I'm guessing you just have to practice like crazy to make the thumb safety swipe a natural part of your draw stroke. Was wondering what the minimum you could get away with. Makes sense what everyone's saying.
I'm not going to tell anyone how to practice and carry their firearm. That's all on you. I will say, though, that thumbing the safety on a 1911 is quick and easy and doesn't take much practice to get used to it.
 
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If you go 1911, get some .45 snap caps and dry fire practice. Practice draw, safety off and fire drills until it becomes routine. You should practice with any weapon you intend on carrying and you will be surprised how quick you pick it up.
 

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Just wondering if anyone carries their 1911 cocked but with the thumb safety off. With the beaver tail safety there and if you kept the trigger on the heavy side, I'm wondering if that's safety enough. I know it's single action and all but asking anyway.
That's freakin' nuts.
 
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Get a 1911 pistol and take it for a spin. They're awfully easy to learn to love. The safety is no big deal with a bit of practice. Once your familiar with the routine you'll have a lot of confidence in the pistol. And you'll enjoy the most delightful trigger you can find on an automatic pistol. There's something to be said for that nice bonus. You'll never look at DAO automatics and their triggers the same way again.
 

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About two dozen times I'm almost made a similar post but always decided against it. But since someone else did, I'll play devil's advocate. Let's say you have a 1911 with a pretty heavy factory trigger- for the sake of argument let's say it's six or seven pounds. Okay, so you've got the grip safety and the trigger. Now let's say it's a one of the later series with a firing pin block. NOW...in reality, explain to me how this would be more dangerous than a Glock. It also has right around the same trigger pull but no grip safety.

To be clear I'm not advocating cocked and unlocked carry, but I think it's a valid thought experiment. Just what makes a cocked single action gun like a 1911 or BHP less safe to carry with the safety off than a striker fired pistol that's always "cocked" (or at least partially cocked)? Or is the difference just in our head, based on the visuals of the hammer being fully cocked?
 
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About two dozen times I'm almost made a similar post but always decided against it. But since someone else did, I'll play devil's advocate. Let's say you have a 1911 with a pretty heavy factory trigger- for the sake of argument let's say it's six or seven pounds. Okay, so you've got the grip safety and the trigger. Now let's say it's a one of the later series with a firing pin block. NOW...in reality, explain to me how this would be more dangerous than a Glock. It also has right around the same trigger pull but no grip safety.

To be clear I'm not advocating cocked and unlocked carry, but I think it's a valid thought experiment. Just what makes a cocked single action gun like a 1911 or BHP less safe to carry with the safety off than a striker fired pistol that's always "cocked" (or at least partially cocked)? Or is the difference just in our head, based on the visuals of the hammer being fully cocked?
If you get a 1911 with a 7 lb trigger pull, send it back to the manufacturer, someone screwed up royally!
 

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If you decide to carry a 1911 that way I'll send you my landline & cell phone numbers. Please give me a call if you're planning to be in my area. I want a heads-up so I can be far away from you, lol.
 

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You don't carry your revolvers already 'cocked' do you?
It would pretty much be the same thing.
Not good!OMOYMV
 

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That is exactly right. Practice until it becomes automatic...
This can not be stressed enough. The silence you hear if you pull the trigger and nothing happens is the loudest thing you'll ever experience. (trust me:gah:)

but if you are carrying a BHP or 1911, use the thumb safety. Holes where you don't intend them to be is not a good thing.
 
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This can not be stressed enough. The silence you hear if you pull the trigger and nothing happens is the loudest thing you'll ever experience. (trust me:gah:)
.
And maybe the last you will ever hear...
 
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Imagine holstering it with your hand depressing the palm safety, you hook the trigger on the edge of the holder or piece of clothing.
That's why you should use the thumb safety for the lock.

Even back in the old days, they may have disconnected the palm safety, but kept the thumb safety.

Also, JMB kept the thumb safety when he did away with the palm safety on the BHP.

That alone should give you enough common sense if you study the design.
If you don't, don't carry it till you understand it.
 

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Emmmm, doesn't that thumb safety have something to do with the hammer not falling and the firing pin not hitting the primer in the event of the hammer falling by some quirk of fate. The Grip safety maybe just has something to do with the trigger pull and not allowing that to happen if its not made. I'm not sure, just can't figure out how anyone could carry a 1911 w/o the thing locked. I get confused like that a lot as I've gotten older. Maybe its because I've seen someone hit with a 45 acp and what it did. I'm afraid of it myself and would never carry it w/o full safe condition.
Technically no, the thumb safety does not block the hammer, it blocks the sear from moving. I'm certain someone not terribly familiar with the platform will disagree, but there is an easy way to prove it, remove the sear, place the safety in the on position like you normally would, cock the hammer fully and release it. The thumb safety will be knocked off safe faster than you can do it manually. :wink:

 
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