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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Defender that, when using the stock ejector, often will eject brass into my forehead. This is more than a nuisance - the casing mouth, if it hits first, can cut and draw blood if I am not wearing a hat, and it's hard not to develop a flinch (even when wearing a hat).

I shaped the ejector face to hopefully change the ejection pattern, and I have had some success. I'd like your thoughts as to whether this ejector is creating other problems.

The stock ejector looks like this (this is a spare I fitted):


I read up on various brass to face fixes. My extractor appears to be fine, so I focused on the ejector. I tried several different configurations, beveling and shaping each time. What I have now is pictured below... I moved the impact surface in towards the primer by beveling the outside surface, and I also beveled the inside surface to cause the case to more consistently rotate. The results are much better - it now throws high and at about 3:30.

However, in the last picture, you will see that the ejector is making a minor dent in the brass (just above the 4 in 45, about 7:30). I do not reload. Is this a problem? Is this ejector surface, which is now angled, imparting too much force on the brass? Will the beveling cause a torquing in the ejector that may cause the ejector to wear or work loose (the defender has an aluminum alloy frame)?

PS: I know it looks terrible and bubba, but now I have about 1 shot in 50 where brass comes back instead of 1 every other mag. And yes, I could have sent it to Colt, but I read that they often do not fix this, and I actually enjoy trying to fix it myself).




 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mine was fixed simply by adjusting the extractor tension.
My initial thought, but the gun did pass the extractor test, and after several hundred rounds I have no failures to feed or eject.
 

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I didn't have any failures to feed or eject either, just brass to forehead. My extractor "seemed" OK as well, but I loosened it a bit. And the ejection problem went away. I also bought a New Agent, as well as a second Defender, and neither exhibited the BTF issue, so I'm figuring the ejector is fine from the factory.

Plus, I'm just not as comfortable as you are, PEF, with do-it-myself surgery on my guns.

Good luck to you, I'm sure you'll find a solution and that you'll enjoy the Defender.
 

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You can round off the bottom of the hook edge of the EXTRACTOR which will allow your brass to be released a bit sooner when wrapped by the ejector.

I would pretty much leave your ejector in factory standard configuration.
 

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I sold a Glock 21 gen4 for that very reason. IMHO when i buy a NIB firearm, i expect it to function properly out of the box without me having to fiddle with it.:rolleyes:
 

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I wouldn't be concerned with marking the brass. You've effectively reduced the impact area on the ejector so the same force on the brass is applied over a smaller area, increasing the stress on the brass - enough to leave a visible dent. I actually think you over-did the metal removal a bit, but it's not a not a problem at all if you don't save your brass, and probably not a problem even if you did reload those cases. Do you know that your unmolested ejector didn't mark cases as well?

Another thing that may come into play is slide speed. That's affected by mainspring "weight", recoil spring weight, and a couple of other details. How far away is your brass being thrown? If it's more than 4-6 feet, you might try a fresh recoil spring (or using one with a higher spring rate) to see if that makes a difference in the case denting.
 

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About 5 years ago, I bought a new Colt Defender and like yours it threw brass at my head hard enough to cut.
At the time, I had two Kimber Ultra's and a Colt Officers, none of which threw brass at my head and they had fired 500+ rounds each.
I send the Defender to Colt and after 10 weeks it returned, still threw brass at my head just like before.
I called Colt and was told that my grip was the problem, I explained that I had three other compact 1911 aluminum 45's that did not throw brass at my head...
That made no difference to Colt customer service, the lady STILL blamed my grip. :mad:
I was ticked. :mad2: I sold the Defender, hopefully the new owner held it properly.
I also sold the Colt Officers and a Colt Lightweight Commander (both worked perfectly) on principle; I would never own a Colt product again.
The funds from selling those Colts those went toward a Dan Wesson Valor, Les Baer UTC, and Ed Brown Special Forces, none of those throw brass at my head.

Have you considered sending the Defender to Colt for repair? :mischievous: :disappointed:
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Pssss.........is not the ejector, it is the extractor, must be barely passing the test, put the original ejector back on and work in adjusting the extractor.
Trying that now. I put in a factory original ejector and increased the tension on the extractor. A lot. Also replace the recoil springs. It throws in the face less, but it still occurs.

I ordered the 1911 shop manual by Kunhausen. I may also try a different extractor, perhaps one by Wilson.

This seems to be a very very common issue with the Defender.

Well, at least I'm learning.
 

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I have a Defender, but not your issue, mine ejects, out, back and right, you're not shooting in a range with partitions between lanes right ?
 

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Update - I received a Wilson Bulletproof extractor. I followed the directions and tensioned it to about 22 - 24 ounces. Maybe this weekend before I can try it out, though.

The Bulletproof extractor has a wider engagement surface (a wider "hook) than the stock ejector. That would seem to result in a more consistent ejection pattern than a narrower engagement surface; whether it will actually result in a more consistent ejection pattern remains to be seen.

Got my Kuhnhausen manuals in the mail, too. He recommend 3 pounds of tension, but I'm going with what Wilson recommended first (1 - 1.5 pounds).

I don't know if I really want to learn a lot more about 1911's, at least not right now....
 

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Discussion Starter #15
good on the Wilson, keep us posted.
Took a detour to the range on the way home tonight.

First couple of mags I had rounds ejecting inconsistently. I had initially tensioned the extractor to about 22-24 ounces. I took the Wilson extractor out and increased the tension, which resulted in no more bonking on the head. However, I was getting some failure to feeds, so I again took the extractor out and decreased the tension. Last 50 rounds or so I got only one near the head, but it did not hit the head. I think I'm near the sweet spot for tension on the new extractor.

Overall the performance is much, much better than with the stock extractor. It's ejecting about 3:30 high.

I really like this gun, but I'm kind of tired of shooting the hell out of it. :)

Well, at least I'm almost there. Don't know if I'll ever get 100% ejection perfection, but 98% may do...
 

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Never owned a Defender so am not qualified to address your exact problem. However I have owned over 200 semi autos, mostly in 1911, many were Colts and still own a large collection and shoot often. I have never, not once, had a shell come back on me. The 1911 I carry daily for work and pleasure tosses the shell casings 90 degrees to the right as they should be.
 
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