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Could someone please tell me the pros/cons between a 1911 with bushing and one that is bushingless. Is one style better than the other?
Thanks in advance!
 

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I have two without bushings and one with... they're very reliable and very accurate and until I clean them, I don't even think about the bushing. :smile:
 

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Could someone please tell me the pros/cons between a 1911 with bushing and one that is bushingless. Is one style better than the other?
Thanks in advance!
A 1911 with a bushing does not have a captured recoil spring. When you turn the recoil spring plug, you must be very carefully or the bushing and spring will come flying out of the pistol at considerable force. My Kimber has a bushing. It is a great gun but I dread cleaning it.
 

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A 1911 with a bushing does not have a captured recoil spring. When you turn the recoil spring plug, you must be very carefully or the bushing and spring will come flying out of the pistol at considerable force. My Kimber has a bushing. It is a great gun but I dread cleaning it.
The flip side of this is that you need a tool of some sort - even a bent paper clip - to retain the spring on a bushingless gun when you disassemble it. I love my Kimber CDP II, but I'm not in love with taking it down. Similarly, my full-size Springfield TRP came with a 2-piece guide rod which required a hex key to disassemble. I swapped that out for a standard recoil spring plug and short guide rod, so now it can be easily disassembled in the field if necessary. Keeping a finger on the spring plug when the bushing is rotated is second nature to me.
 

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Many target shooters prefer the bushing models because you can tailor the fit between the barrel and the bushing and tighten up accuracy. The bushingless models are a set tolerance from the factory and are generally not considered necessarily "target tight". Also, once they wear and that tolerance opens up, you cannot just replace the bushing and tighten it back up. It just gets sloppier and is much more difficult to tighten up.
 

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Many target shooters prefer the bushing models because you can tailor the fit between the barrel and the bushing and tighten up accuracy. The bushingless models are a set tolerance from the factory and are generally not considered necessarily "target tight". Also, once they wear and that tolerance opens up, you cannot just replace the bushing and tighten it back up. It just gets sloppier and is much more difficult to tighten up.
This is a very good point. Not only that, recoil springs should be replaced at certain intervals depending on the model.
 

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Short barrel 1911s seem to operate better if they are bushingless.
 

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I think bushingless guns were introduced because their production was easier for the factory.
 

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Also, once they wear and that tolerance opens up, you cannot just replace the bushing and tighten it back up. It just gets sloppier and is much more difficult to tighten up.
Ummm... not entirely true. That's what oversize bushings are for, and fitting them to slide and barrel is not an uncommon task for a pistolsmith.
 

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My Dan Wesson CBOB has a bushing and I find it very easy to take apart for cleaning without tools. I like that.
 

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Ummm... not entirely true. That's what oversize bushings are for, and fitting them to slide and barrel is not an uncommon task for a pistolsmith.
I'm talking about guns without bushings. It is a major gunsmith chore to machine the slide to accept a bushing when it wears to the point you are losing accuracy.
 

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Not true with a bushingless design; by the time you affect the fit between the slide and the barrel you will have probably shot out the barrel anyway and will need to replace it.....
 

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I'll stick with the point that people that typically prefer a really accurate 1911 prefer the models with the bushings.
 

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A 1911 with a bushing does not have a captured recoil spring. When you turn the recoil spring plug, you must be very carefully or the bushing and spring will come flying out of the pistol at considerable force. My Kimber has a bushing. It is a great gun but I dread cleaning it.
That is easily fixed, the U.S. Ordnance inspector figured that one out back in June 1912. :wink:
Get yourself a recoil spring plug which has the lip punched in it, that allows you to "screw" the plug onto the recoil spring.



If your barrel bushing and spring are coming out together, you're taking the pistol down incorrectly. You first turn the bushing to the left (looking at the muzzle), that allows the lug on the bushing to "lock" into the corresponding channel in the slide, your bushing cannot come off with the spring and plug.
 

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To support my point about the preference for the bushing for accuracy, the big three, Wilson, Baer and Ed Brown all use bushing models for their builds because they are able to tailor fit a match barrel and bushing for increased accuracy. Ed Brown states he uses a match barrel and all steel bushing for highest accuracy. Go to their websites and verify it.

Factory fit for bushingless models is not nearly as good as with the others.
 

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I think the reason you don't see bushings on short barrel 1911's is due to the lack of room when the slide cycles.

I used to have a Springfield LW Champion. It may be my imagination, but I was thinking that there was a pinned in busing in the slide that could be replaced??? Or, maybe I'm just hallucinating, again:image035:
 

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That is easily fixed, the U.S. Ordnance inspector figured that one out back in June 1912. :wink:
Get yourself a recoil spring plug which has the lip punched in it, that allows you to "screw" the plug onto the recoil spring.



If your barrel bushing and spring are coming out together, you're taking the pistol down incorrectly. You first turn the bushing to the left (looking at the muzzle), that allows the lug on the bushing to "lock" into the corresponding channel in the slide, your bushing cannot come off with the spring and plug.
My Kimber Custom TLE/ TX II looks nothing like this. The spring and bushing are totally independent of the rod. It is a chore to take down but I do it every time I shoot it. It shoots so well that I'm not sure if I want to change anything. I will check with my gunmaker to see if the bushing can be crimped.
 

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My Kimber Custom TLE/ TX II looks nothing like this. The spring and bushing are totally independent of the rod. It is a chore to take down but I do it every time I shoot it. It shoots so well that I'm not sure if I want to change anything. I will check with my gunmaker to see if the bushing can be crimped.
Take a small flat screwdriver and place the blade under your thumb, ( flat ways)and push in on just the edge of the spring cap, then rotate the bushing out of the way, then slowly let the cap up and pull the spring out, then rotate the bushing the other way and remove it. This works best for me.
 

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I'm talking about guns without bushings. It is a major gunsmith chore to machine the slide to accept a bushing when it wears to the point you are losing accuracy.
Whoops - right you are. I mis-read your original post.
 

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My Dan Wesson CBOB has a bushing and I find it very easy to take apart for cleaning without tools. I like that.
But your signature states you carry a glock. :confused:
 
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