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Anyone here have experience with the terminal effects a 357 mag produces from a lever action rifle?

When shot at deer or similar game, is the resulting tissue damage more like what pistol rounds cause or more like a typical rifle wound? Does the tissue damage extend laterally from the bullet track, or is the damage just inline with crushing path of the bullet?
 

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My only experience is a comparison between my 2½" SP101 & Wifes Henry Big Boy, both in 357.
I shot AR500 plate with 38spl from 10 yards, just marks in the paint.
Wife shot the same plate with the same ammo from 50 yards and it left craters in the metal.

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Can’t say I paid much attention to the wound. Will say that deer either dropped right away or took a few steps and dropped. Never ran with a .357 hit from the rifle.
 

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I haven't shot a deer with my Marlin .357 because Illinois never did allow it when they were expanding the use of different firearms. But i did once load a .44 180 gr xtp into a sabot in my old Thompson Center Hawken Rifle. I'd guess the fps was very close to what it would have been in a Marlin .44 Mag Carbine.

The deer looked like it had been hit by a varmint load. It's been so long ago I can't remember if it was the entrance or exit wound that was so large. So large in fact that the other hunters with me laid the deer so that the wound was not seen when we checked it in. They were afraid it was so different then what was normally seen with slugs that there might be a problem. It was a double lung shot so there was not meat destruction.
 

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I haven't shot a deer with my Marlin .357 because Illinois never did allow it when they were expanding the use of different firearms. But i did once load a .44 180 gr xtp into a sabot in my old Thompson Center Hawken Rifle. I'd guess the fps was very close to what it would have been in a Marlin .44 Mag Carbine.

The deer looked like it had been hit by a varmint load. It's been so long ago I can't remember if it was the entrance or exit wound that was so large. So large in fact that the other hunters with me laid the deer so that the wound was not seen when we checked it in. They were afraid it was so different then what was normally seen with slugs that there might be a problem. It was a double lung shot so there was not meat destruction.
Is the edit feature gone now?

The deer ran the usual 20 to 30 yards before dropping.
 

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With some of the .357 loads running right at the lower end of rifle velocity with a 6" barrel. They are going to pick up speed from the longer barrel of a carbine.
One of the techs in the crime lab was a ballistic guy. He had been trying to reproduce hydrolic shock from pistol bullets.He said even though he could get it to work in some other calibers "Sometimes", in .357 loaded hot he could get that result more often.
I have done no testing on this But I would guess that a hot load from a carbine barrel would be more effective. DR
 

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Distance to target would be a factor, for example 20 yards versus 100.
No experience with 357 Mag. I did shoot a deer with 10mm Delta Elite and 155 XTP.
Bullet impacted deer at 18 yards, ~1,300 fps made 1 1/4'' hole in tissue, bullet only expands to .65
Based on my example of one, I'm skeptical of 2,000 fps or whatever being a magical minimum where tissue damage is greater than bullet touches; I documented it at 1,300 fps. My opinion is that the damage increases as velocity does, perhaps 1,000 fps is no extra damage (most pistol calibers), 1,300 fps becomes measurable (357 Sig/Mag, 10mm) and at 2,200 fps rifle like pulp.
 
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