Defensive Carry banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I have an EAA Corp Windicator 357 Mag double/single action revolver. I absolutely love it. The barrel is compatible with 357 or .38 special rounds. My issue is I cannot find a .38 cylinder ANYWHERE. I looked on EEA's websote and couldn't find one and I've buzzed all over my area and the internet and cannot find one. I love the revolver as is, but it would be nice to have the .38 special cylinder if I wanted it. Does anyone know where I could find one for a decent price?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,276 Posts
Hmmm. I don't have one so I'll certainly defer to anyone who does but I've shot plenty of .38 out of .357s without any issue. Interesting question but I'd bet it's more about some goofy liability instead of any actual reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,680 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
For future reference, I know of no .357mag revolver that you would not be able to shoot 38spl from. Just be sure to clean cylinders well after extensive 38spl if you plan on using .357 after. The shorter case of 38 can leave a build up in cylinder at the point a 357 bullet would seat inside.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
Just little additional info, the only difference between the 38spl and the 357mag is the case length with the 357mag being .125 or 1/8th inch longer thus preventing the 357 from being fully inserting in a 38 chamber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
For future reference, I know of no .357mag revolver that you would not be able to shoot 38spl from. Just be sure to clean cylinders well after extensive 38spl if you plan on using .357 after. The shorter case of 38 can leave a build up in cylinder at the point a 357 bullet would seat inside.
I have same issue but if imbok with only shooting 38spl can I get the cylinder for a 38spl and it'll fit ok in the 38spl/357mag I have? Because my understanding is the only thing stopping a 357 round from fitting the 38spl cylinder I a step that is made in that cylinder but over all cylinder length should be same either way correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I have same issue but if imbok with only shooting 38spl can I get the cylinder for a 38spl and it'll fit ok in the 38spl/357mag I have? Because my understanding is the only thing stopping a 357 round from fitting the 38spl cylinder I a step that is made in that cylinder but over all cylinder length should be same either way correct?
No...there is more to it than that..depends on manufacturer, model and weather you can actually find a cylinder for it...example: I have a S&W 640 no dash in .38 Spl..the early 640's had the shorter frame and the cylinder is shorter than the later 640's also the early 640's weren't rated for plus P....there is nothing wrong with shooting .38 SPL in a .357 Mag..you just need to clean the cylinders well before shooting .357 Mag..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,422 Posts
In the beginning there were Colt revolvers, and the Lord saw that they were good. Then the old Colt .36 caliber percussion revolvers were converted to fixed cartridge ammunition, first the .38 Colt rimfire and next the .38 Colt centerfire (which was made in both Short and Long versions, having different powder charges for different uses). All was good until late in the 1890s when US military forces in the Philippine Insurrection found that the .38 Long Colt cartridge was not very effective at stopping doped-up tribesmen attacking with knives at close quarters. So the .38 Long Colt cartridge was lengthened a bit to allow for a larger charge of black powder to increase velocity and energy levels, and new revolvers were offered by Smith & Wesson to accept the new .38 S&W Special cartridge.

All remained very good until the mid-1930s when lawmen found themselves dealing with organized gangs of "automobile bandits" terrorizing towns and robbing banks, armored cars, and retail stores. The perceived need was for a cartridge capable of penetrating automobile doors, glass, and body work with sufficient remaining power to put down the gangsters. Smith & Wesson stepped up again with a new revolver featuring better steel alloys and heat-treatment processes and chambered for the .357 Magnum, a new development with a cartridge case about 1/8" longer than its parent .38 Special and loaded with heavy charges of smokeless powders to achieve very impressive levels of performance.

With a few refinements along the way the situation has remained largely the same for the past 85 years or so. Any .357 Magnum revolver of standard dimensions and capacities will accept and fire the .38 Special, .38 Long Colt, and .38 Short Colt ammunition.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top