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Discussion Starter #1
DF members, I just bought a CMMG Anvil in .458 SOCOM for pig hunting & I am looking for info / direction on ammo & optics.
Ammo- what grain is best suited for pigs?
- what distance should I sight the gun in for?
Optics- I am leaning towards a 1x6 w/ illuminated reticle but not sure if I need to worry about recoil, & what make & model of scopes does anyone use w/ this caliber.
Any & all help about this & hunting pigs would be greatly appreciated. I have zero experience in hunting bacon, I have hunted deer & bear. The pig hunt will be next October in South Carolina from stands & blinds over bait on several different farms w/ guides. I will also be carrying my G40 to try some 10mm medicine on the pigs too.
Thank for your time.
Glock10mm
 

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.458 is more than enough gun for hogs. It is comparable for a .45/70 in ballistics and so you really can't go wrong with anything between 300 and 400 grains. You can go lightweight, but the BC declines quite a bit, though you get a flatter trajectory, initially. I don't think you need to worry about that. With a 350 gr. bullet, should should be solid out to 150 yards with very little or no POA change. That should take care 98% of your hunting.

Checked some posts of a buddy of mine that hunts with .458 Socom on another forum, he had posted...

Recommend you try the 300 gr. Barnes TTSX while you are experimenting.

My personal preference is the 405 grain Remington Soft Point, VERY hard hitting and surprisingly accurate bullet.

The Beartootch 525 gr. hardcast 'piledriver' (even subsonic) will shoot through them from any angle (nose to tail if need be). I've never recovered a piledriver from a hog. Of course...it has limited application in terms of trajectory.
I would suggest staying away from the lightweight ARX polymer bullets. They do work when they hit, but accuracy seems to fall off from 50 to 100 yards. I hunted with a fellow that could not hit hogs with them at 125 yards due to a crosswind. Three shots in about 5 seconds, all shots drifted with the wind.

What distance should you sight in the gun for? That really depends. I like to sight in for what I consider to be the typical hunting distances which for most people is 50-100 yards and so I sight in at 100, putting my shots about an inch low at 50 and so that I am still covered out to 150+. I know a lot of folks that sight in at 200, meaning they are 2" or high at 100. However, I don't believe you should have to make sighting corrections for the typical distances you are apt to be hunting. Here is what happens when you get a hog at 80 yards and try a head shot and forget you are running a couple of inches high...


This hog was picked up with a later shot...to the shoulder.
 
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I agree with sighting you .458 at 100 - it is far slower moving than most modern hunting calibers, and that does make a difference in trajectory. If you treat it like a .308 and zero for 200, you will need to be thinking about holdovers if you are shooting at 100.

I'd also agree with the suggestion of the 300 grain Barnes TTSX. Kills hogs dead. According to Bill Wilson (founder and owner of Wilson Combat, and dedicated hog hunter), the .458 is the "hammer of Thor" on pigs. His company offers a .458 hunting load....and surprise, surprise - one of their two uses the 300 grain TTSX bullet. MY personal experience with the Wilson ammo is that it is more consistent than most .458 ammo, and shoots tighter groups through my rifle than anything else I have tried.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Folks, thanks for the info! I was taught to zero my 5.56 in for 50yrds so I was good out to 200yrds & this is why I was asking about the .459.....I have been in search mode now for ammo & reading everything I can find & have bought- Black Butterfly, Premium Nickel Plated, .458 SOCOM, 300 gr, Barnes TTSX BT & Black Butterfly, Premium, No2 High Velocity, .458 SOCOM, 300 gr, Lead Free Frangible CTX Migration for a trial run. A buddy of mine reloads so we will be going down that road soon. Again thanks for the responses & if anyone has more ideas or areas I can look to gain more info please pass it along!
Be safe.
 

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I'd also agree with the suggestion of the 300 grain Barnes TTSX. Kills hogs dead. According to Bill Wilson (founder and owner of Wilson Combat, and dedicated hog hunter), the .458 is the "hammer of Thor" on pigs.
Gotta love hype. A buddy of mine thought this as well when he got his .458 Socom, and then he realized that it really wasn't the Hammer of Thor. It was just a bigger, badder bullet that didn't seem to kill hogs any deader than his .308 or 6.8, so he went back to his 6.8 because with less recoil, he could make faster followup shots when dealing with sounders. This isn't to say that it isn't a fine round, but nothing magical or spectacular happens when you shoot a hog with one, no more so than when you do with a .45/70.
 
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