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Discussion Starter #1
I ran 150 rounds of Winchester 115g FMJ through my Mod2 9mm today at 7yds ,10-15 rounds per target and i pulled the target up to look each 5 rounds.
First shot of the day is ALWAYS bullseye for some reason then i digress from there LOL
I attempted to correct my actions but most were low and/or left, I noticed after a couple of targets i was forgetting to 'stage' the trigger (I haven't even BEGUN to work on reset) but that change didn't help a lot.
I have looked at the pie graphic on this but I'm thinking I have multiple issues :aargh4:



 
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I am no expert but I think this is a trigger control problem. Perhaps you can forget all the trigger mumbo jumbo and just practice a smooth trigger pull. If you have not received training.. get some training. I say that because someone watching you closely is the easiest way to identify the problem. Here on the forum its just guess work.
 

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Just suggestions...make sure your wrist's are locked...control muzzle flip...correct amount of finger in trigger guard and squeeze that trigger.

I think locking wrists and controlling muzzle flip, will help your groups.

And, as with all new to you, handguns...experiment with your grip...all do not like the same grip.

Shooter's Wheel will show this to be a trigger problem...but to improve trigger problems, you have to control the muzzle of the gun.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I now have 300 rounds through her, 250 mine and 50 my wife shot, and I hadn't shot a handgun in many years so i think i'm doing fair i just want to see improvement. I'm a better shot at 75 yds with my buddy's HK91 on iron sights than i am this little sucker!
Lot of fun though, this is the third Sunday in a row I've gone and having to wait on a lane etc has afforded me the opportunity to meet some other shooters and get to know the staff better.
 

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A lot of striker fired guns have creep in the trigger where you are pulling it back but no resistance. This allows bad things to happen. Practice dry firing while holding the sights on target through the break. You have to train the finger to come straight back to overcome the low left happing. Putting the trigger finger in deeper might help too. And a thumbs forward grip.
 

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Maybe you were just tiring. Get rested and try it again.
I'm 66 and i was taking the NRA Marksmanship Qualifying out doors in mid 90's Texas sun and heat. The longer your in firing position. the more WOBBLY your arms get. Hydrate and rest more between shooting reps.
 
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I AM an expert! "Ex" is a has-been. "Pert" is a small release of gas under pressure. :biggrin2:


Seriously, are you shooting two-handed? Looks to me like you're gripping so hard that your interfering with a smooth, rearward trigger press. Try consontrating on pressing your palms directly toward one-another with your pectoral (chest) muscles to control the handgun, don't over-tighten your forearms. Leave them relatively loose to press the trigger. Try it dry-firing and the advantage will quickly become evident. :yup:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
LOL!!!
200 rounds today (20 in each target) targets are in order of use (last 20 IDK guess i was getting lazy LOL) from same 7yds looking better
 
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LOL!!!
200 rounds today (20 in each target) targets are in order of use (last 20 IDK guess i was getting lazy LOL) from same 7yds looking better
It is hard work. Nice shooting !
 
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It has always seemed a silly line to me, but it does seem to help some shooters with trigger control: be surprised when the gun goes bang.

Those look like anticipation patterns to my eye, but not seeing you shoot makes it tough to tell for sure. If I was with you at the range, I'd take away your mags and load them with dummy rounds dispersed throughout. It's a good exercise to do when you've got a partner at the range and provides very obvious examples of anticipation shooting, to both the shooter and whoever is spotting for you. But the magic is in not knowing which rounds are live and which are dummies.

That and dry-fire practice, will get your holes better centered. When you can go through mags with dummy rounds...and not see a big twitch on those dummy presses, reset shooting becomes much easier to learn.
 

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It has always seemed a silly line to me, but it does seem to help some shooters with trigger control: be surprised when the gun goes bang.

Those look like anticipation patterns to my eye, but not seeing you shoot makes it tough to tell for sure. If I was with you at the range, I'd take away your mags and load them with dummy rounds dispersed throughout. It's a good exercise to do when you've got a partner at the range and provides very obvious examples of anticipation shooting, to both the shooter and whoever is spotting for you. But the magic is in not knowing which rounds are live and which are dummies.

That and dry-fire practice, will get your holes better centered. When you can go through mags with dummy rounds...and not see a big twitch on those dummy presses, reset shooting becomes much easier to learn.
That is also a good way to practice clearing a failure.
 

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pijo73 ... I applaud your openness to learn and desire to improve. In addition to some great advise already given here, I'll throw in my 2 cents in hopes that it will be beneficial in some small way. In addition to efforts to learn to pull/squeeze the trigger straight back, the two things that I have found most helpful in my personal desire to improve my shooting are as follows:

1. Dryfire Practice with a nickle - To get consistent and repeatable "small group" results on paper, I've found that it is imperative to fine tune and monitor my stance, hold, breathing, sight picture, trigger squeeze and follow through. Dryfire practice with a nickle placed behind the front sight is one of the best ways I've found to quickly ferret out any bad habits or unproductive movement that would negatively impact my accuracy. Once you are able to consistantly dry fire (20+ repetitions) without any movement of the nickle, I suspect you will see significant improvement in your groups at the range.


2. Aim small miss small exercises - While the silhouette targets are great for self defense/center mass practice, to really fine tune my accuracy, (at the suggestion of a friend 6+ years ago), I made ASMS exercises a part of every range session. Simply place two or three 1" shoot-n-see adhesive dots on a piece of plain paper and place it at your prefered distance for the exercise (I prefer 7 - 12 yards as they get mighty small beyond that) and shoot 3 to 10 rounds at each 1" target. I discovered very quickly that it helps improve your focus and will serve to tighten up your groups. The immediate feedback from the placement of each shoot proved very valuable to me and I still start with the exercise at each range trip. The targets below are representative of my typical result. Hope that it helps.



 

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Take the nickel exercise one step up. This requires a second person with you. Insure and inspect to make sure the gun is empty and no ammo is in the same room. Then using a two handed grip with the trigger reset to fire, have the second person place a penny on top of the front sight. Squeeze the trigger smoothly so the penny does not fall off when the striker fires. Do this until you can repeat 10 times with success. This is one of the warm up drills at some of the Alumni Gun Fighting shoots that I have done.
 
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It has always seemed a silly line to me, but it does seem to help some shooters with trigger control: be surprised when the gun goes bang.

Those look like anticipation patterns to my eye, but not seeing you shoot makes it tough to tell for sure. If I was with you at the range, I'd take away your mags and load them with dummy rounds dispersed throughout. It's a good exercise to do when you've got a partner at the range and provides very obvious examples of anticipation shooting, to both the shooter and whoever is spotting for you. But the magic is in not knowing which rounds are live and which are dummies.

That and dry-fire practice, will get your holes better centered. When you can go through mags with dummy rounds...and not see a big twitch on those dummy presses, reset shooting becomes much easier to learn.
Agree. When shooting my .357 magnum my results with magnum rounds were not as good as with .38 special rounds. When I would put one .38 special round in with five .357 (not knowing where the .38 was)I could see the "flinch" in my grip when I got the the .38 round (expecting a .357) as I was pulling the trigger and anticipating the bang. I then started mixing the two in different quantities and was able to correct.
 
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