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Discussion Starter #1
I have 2 revolvers both from the 1980's. Both Smith and Wesson.
One is a K frame full size .38/.357 and the other is a .38 airweight snubbie.
I have others that are family heirlooms that i do not want to touch.
I acquired these 2 that have never been shot until I got them. They are in pristine condition.
My question is I want to make them faster and more accurate to shoot especially double action to put them into my carry rotation. Bone stock they are too difficult to control in DA.
I know that you need a pretty good smith to do quality work on revolvers. I do not want a hair trigger, but they need to to smooth and lightened up some. I know there are other tweaks that can be done.
Do y'all know or have experience with gunsmiths I can send them out to to get quality work done?
Other than a trigger job what else should I be looking at to make them smooth shooters?
 

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One of the easiest ways to improve trigger pull is to install a lighter weight trigger rebound spring kit like this one, be sure to order the installation tool at the same time. I have done on a couple of revolvers and been very pleased with the results.
Wolff Trigger Rebound Spring Pack S&W J K L N-Frame
 

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...or just shoot them a lot. Half of good DA work is building strength in the trigger finger.
 

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Thanks for the feedback, but I am really looking for some references on professional gunsmiths to really go through and work the gun.
I see some on line but i was wondering if anyone had any experience having their revolvers done.
 

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Jerry has a Video/DVD on doing action jobs on S&W revolvers. It's not hard especially if you're interested in a carry piece. You don't want to take the action, Double Action, down below 8 lbs or you will be limited on ammo.
Apex (Randy Lee) and TK Custom (Tom Kilhoffer) are two top class Revolver 'smiths. If they can't do it in a timely manner they may even know someone who can. Both are good people to deal with.
 

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Thanks for the feedback, but I am really looking for some references on professional gunsmiths to really go through and work the gun.
I see some on line but i was wondering if anyone had any experience having their revolvers done.
Do you want to deal with "shipping", OR "in state/metroplex"?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Do you want to deal with "shipping", OR "in state/metroplex"?
Would not mind keeping it in Texas, I love to support our local and state gun folks.
But not a deal breaker, I am mostly looking for someone to really make these pistols perform.
 

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I don't do any work (except extensive dry firing) on any of the triggers of any of my revolvers, unless it's broke.

My brother in law Lives in Frisco and had good things to say about a guy named Frank Smith. He's the former owner of Lone Star Guns in Plano. I think he said he moved to Comanche and is still gun smithing.
 

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I know you don't want to take the time but, firing a gun is the best trigger job even over professional smiths as they cannot wear the parts to each other like actual use does and like someone already said it strengthens your trigger finger and overall hand strength. I personally would not carry a revolver under 10 pounds DA. Defeats one of the revolvers main attributes in carry safety and unintentional shooting. Smooth is more important than light in a good trigger IMHO.
I have watched entire movies pulling the trigger on a new revolver (with snap caps) and switched hands back and forth. A few nights of soreness pays huge dividends over the money spent on a smith
 

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I do my own.
Take them apart, "stone" all the flat bearing surfaces, install the Wolff spring kit, lube and carry on.
Hard Arkansas stone set
All you're doing is taking off the rough edges, just faster than running a ton of ammo through them.
 

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If you ever need to fend for your life with one of your revolvers you won't be thinking about how smooth or light the trigger pull is. My carry guns have stiff triggers so I don't accidentally shoot me or someone else while holstering it.
 

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If you shoot someone or yourself while reholstering a DA revolver whether it has a trigger job or not, you have a trigger finger problem not a trigger problem I assure you. A lot of people do other things such as target shoot, hunt, and plink with their revolvers. A good going over by a pro to check headspace, timing, and smooth out the trigger is a safe and responsible thing to do. And ohhh the single action break. You have no clue what you are missing.
 

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You don't carry a target gun for self protection. I'm not putting my life on the line with a gun that's had 10,000 + rounds fired though it. You only fire the gun you carry enough to be proficient with it, you don't wear it out. You don't have to have your finger on the trigger to have a discharge putting a gun in a holster especially if it's a Glock. Google police accidental discharge holstering pistol.
 

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You don't carry a target gun for self protection. I'm not putting my life on the line with a gun that's had 10,000 + rounds fired though it. You only fire the gun you carry enough to be proficient with it, you don't wear it out. You don't have to have your finger on the trigger to have a discharge putting a gun in a holster especially if it's a Glock. Google police accidental discharge holstering pistol.

I am not really sure what a striker fired negligent discharge while playing tactical teddy no look reholster has to do with a DA revolver trigger job for carry, something that has been done since before we were both born.... nor do I think you understand the function of a revolver ar all, but you do your thing.
 

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I had a trigger job administered to a new Smith & Wesson Model 14 K-38 one time and came to rue the day I ever allowed the work to take place for I then had to spend money to resuscitate the revolver from the ravages of the results. From a practical standpoint, it had been rendered unusable. Oh the double-action trigger was light and smooth. It was to die for. The single-action trigger was like breaking a hair-like glass rod. Why one could just "think off" the trigger squeeze. Only thing was, one could also press the tip of his thumb into the back of the hammer spur and push the hammer off the single-action sear and it did not take much pressure to do so.

A new trigger and hammer and $40 later I had a revolver back in hand. This would have been back in 1980 when $40 meant rather more to a young man forging a new career and with mortgage, household expenses, and family responsibilities. Bit bitter about that experience and it soured me somewhat on action jobs, but I still enjoy shooting that same K-38 to this day. It's the one with its butt toward the edge of the shooting bench and resting with its companion Model 17 K-22 after a recent shooting session together.


Since that time I came to learn that use of the handgun, both shooting and dry-fire practice, coupled with attentive maintenance has served me well for the "usin' guns" that I intended to rely on for serious social purposes.

I know how to tune a Smith & Wesson. I can (maybe) tune an older V-Spring Colt. I can work on them and rehabilitate them if they are out of adjustment or broken. I don't bother with "action jobs" on my own revolvers though because by the time I learned my way around the innards of the things they were smooth enough and I was well skilled enough in shooting them that no tuning work was required.

Same goes for 1911 guns for my purposes.

There are no short cuts to firearms skills. It takes time invested more than it takes dollars and the dollars that are invested ought to go for practice (read that fun) ammo above all else. Always remember that it's not possible to buy your way, customize your way, gunsmith your way, or gagetize your way into becoming skillful. Not without attendant practiced use. I must preach to myself on this for I get rusty without regular practice.

Decent firearms, thoughtfully practiced with, trump the latest and greatest high-dollar firearms festooned with trick gadgets ... every time. For that matter even cheap-o guns thoughtfully practiced with beat high-dollar stuff every time.

This is not what the firearms industry marketing wants shooters to come to realize and it's also not what looks the most "studly" when shooting pals get together for show-and-tell or when one's equipment is trotted out at the range for all to see.

I'm not the best in the west when it comes to guns. I don't dwell on the drills deemed as essential skills in the current conventional wisdom of today's gun culture. I can confidently contribute a positive outcome to a self-defense situation though. I'm a deliberate shooter, a hobbyist shooter, but I can hurry things up no end if it is required and still make hits.




Regarding not using the gun that's had 10,000 plus rounds fired through it for self-protection.

I particularly want to rely my same ol' guns, some of which have had many times 10,000 rounds fired through them and rely on them I will. I'm familiar with them. I can hit with them slow or fast, near or far. They inspire my confidence. They are not yet worn out through heavily used since as far back as the mid to late 1970s. They are holding up better than I am at this point in our mutual careers and they will see me through.

I love to collect vintage guns and enjoy trying or even purchasing the occasional new gun. Gun-of-the-month is fun, but not for the purpose of constantly switching the chosen carry piece. There's no future in that endless chase for the ultimate side arm. I'll play the field on occasion carrying various handguns I have, but most all of them are the same basic Smith & Wesson revolver design or 1911 design. I'm the warmest and fuzziest when I'm toting my old favorites though.

I've never been a lawman. The best that I can offer along that line is nothing more than weekend all-night gun show security for some promoter friends for a number of years now. Well that, and a lifetime of personal and family protection under all circumstances. Same guns used seriously are the ones that are used for play and the favorites have been heavily used.

Sorry Kilted Cowboy.

This post turned into a "pontification." Wasn't aimed at you either. If you feel your revolvers' actions are heavy or gritty you just "git 'er done" and have them worked to your liking. I could sure take the position that a smooth revolver is more gratifying to own and use.
 

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I've had great service from S&W Custom shop. They did my 36 and 19 before I purchased them from a local deputy when he retired.
Had some trouble with the 19 a couple years after I bought it. Called S&W and they took care of it. Cost me the shipping and new springs, no labor. They even cut the barrel to reset the cylinder gap. Turn around was just over a week.

I'd send another one there if I had one that needs work.
 
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