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OK, I was doing a favor for my daughter, filing some paper work for her to the friend of the courts so she might be able to get some child support from her baby's dad.
The FOTC offices are in the district court building so no weapons allowed. They have sherrif's deputies at the door, with metal detectors and x-ray scanners like they use at the airport.

I enter carrying my cell phone, PDA and my car keys and the paper work for the FOTC. I know I have a "SMALL" pocket knife on the key ring that is disguised to look like a standard key. I have had it for 20 years. I have taken it through airport security (pre 9/11) before.

I figure the 2" blade isn't considered a weapon. I put the keyring and PDA and Cell phone in the basket he hands me so I cna go through the metal detector.

The deputy immediatly reaches in and pick up the key-knife. He smiles and says no weapons allowed, and no cell phones either. I then notice the sign that says no cameras are allowed. Neither my PDA or cell phone takes pictures, but it's no big deal so I tell him "No problem, i'll be right back" He smiles and says, I''ll be here!"

I return to the car and place everything in the car, go through the security check point, drop off the paperwork. On the way out I tell the deputy, "I'm impressed, no one ever notices that knife. You have really keen eyes."
The deputy says "Thanks"
 

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Although I'm not a big fan of being unarmed, I'm always happy to hear a story of a smart, attentive Deputy doing his job! If I'm gonna' follow the rules and disarm, it's nice to know he (she) is gonna' do their dead-level best to make sure that everybody else is legal as well.
 

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I have a similar incident that will sound like an urban legend, but this one I know is true. My father was a WWII vet and received a military send-off when he passed away in 1987. Following the 21 gun salute, one memeber of the rifle squad presented my son with a spent casing from the ceremony. My son, a young adult at the time, drilled a hole in the casing wall, pushed out the spent primer, and installed a ring so he could use this as a key chain.

He carried that memento for years, including through airport security many, many times -- pre and post 9/11. A couple years back while checking in at O'hara, he placed his key ring and other items in the small basket as always and proceeded through the metal detector. As soon as he picked up the basket on the other side, he was met by two TSA personnel and a Chicago PD officer, and placed under arrest. He wasn't handcuffed, but led to a back room where the questioning began. This went on for over two hours and to say he was scared was an understatement. Over and over they questioned him as to what his plans were, and despite his assurance the harmelss spent casing was a memory of his grandfather's funeral, the quiz continued. He was released that afternoon, minus the memento he had treasured. Of course, his flight had left hours earlier and he now had to rebook.

I'm not here to rant, and indeed he perhaps should have considered the consequences of that brass casing. However, common sense should come into play on the other side, too. No bullet, no powder, no primer, and drilled and worn down from several years of riding in a persons pocket -- not a lot of danger from that memory. I wasn't so upset by the actions of the officers as I was of those who put us in the sorry situation.

Badlands
 

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I have a similar incident that will sound like an urban legend, but this one I know is true. My father was a WWII vet and received a military send-off when he passed away in 1987. Following the 21 gun salute, one memeber of the rifle squad presented my son with a spent casing from the ceremony. My son, a young adult at the time, drilled a hole in the casing wall, pushed out the spent primer, and installed a ring so he could use this as a key chain.

He carried that memento for years, including through airport security many, many times -- pre and post 9/11. A couple years back while checking in at O'hara, he placed his key ring and other items in the small basket as always and proceeded through the metal detector. As soon as he picked up the basket on the other side, he was met by two TSA personnel and a Chicago PD officer, and placed under arrest. He wasn't handcuffed, but led to a back room where the questioning began. This went on for over two hours and to say he was scared was an understatement. Over and over they questioned him as to what his plans were, and despite his assurance the harmelss spent casing was a memory of his grandfather's funeral, the quiz continued. He was released that afternoon, minus the memento he had treasured. Of course, his flight had left hours earlier and he now had to rebook.

I'm not here to rant, and indeed he perhaps should have considered the consequences of that brass casing. However, common sense should come into play on the other side, too. No bullet, no powder, no primer, and drilled and worn down from several years of riding in a persons pocket -- not a lot of danger from that memory. I wasn't so upset by the actions of the officers as I was of those who put us in the sorry situation.

Badlands
This kind of crap warrants a rant if anything does. *** are those government jerks thinking? Forgot, they're government, they can not think. Must have been a really slow day for them. I have my senators and representatives on cell phone speed dial and both their offices would have been made aware of what was happening. On second thought, it would never happen to me because I will not subject myself to that kind of abuse by flying.
oldogy
 

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I have a similar incident that will sound like an urban legend, but this one I know is true. My father was a WWII vet and received a military send-off when he passed away in 1987. Following the 21 gun salute, one memeber of the rifle squad presented my son with a spent casing from the ceremony. My son, a young adult at the time, drilled a hole in the casing wall, pushed out the spent primer, and installed a ring so he could use this as a key chain.

He carried that memento for years, including through airport security many, many times -- pre and post 9/11. A couple years back while checking in at O'hara, he placed his key ring and other items in the small basket as always and proceeded through the metal detector. As soon as he picked up the basket on the other side, he was met by two TSA personnel and a Chicago PD officer, and placed under arrest. He wasn't handcuffed, but led to a back room where the questioning began. This went on for over two hours and to say he was scared was an understatement. Over and over they questioned him as to what his plans were, and despite his assurance the harmelss spent casing was a memory of his grandfather's funeral, the quiz continued. He was released that afternoon, minus the memento he had treasured. Of course, his flight had left hours earlier and he now had to rebook.

I'm not here to rant, and indeed he perhaps should have considered the consequences of that brass casing. However, common sense should come into play on the other side, too. No bullet, no powder, no primer, and drilled and worn down from several years of riding in a persons pocket -- not a lot of danger from that memory. I wasn't so upset by the actions of the officers as I was of those who put us in the sorry situation.

Badlands
Along the same lines, it infruriates me that our WWII vets being taken on Freedom Flights to D.C. to visit the WWII memorial, many in wheelchairs, have to go through all the security nonsense. If ever there were a group that had earned the right to have these TSA checks waived, the WWII vets are that group!
 

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That is a stinky situation, I think I would just ask for the unit superivsor and to use the phone my own lawyer. Knowing I'd be there all day anyway might as well keep my stuff. I could address an envelope and mail it home to solve the issue, that is of course if the USPS could find my home and my mail box which is only a 50/50 chance....
 

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I really enjoyed this read. Reminds me of the last time I was at the County Courthouse during the winter and the Deputies didn't even make people take off their coats. I walked in with no coat, no belt, no nothing.
 

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Funny. My missus and I went though airport security just last week, and when we landed, she noticed her Spyderco Delica 4 in her purse where she always keeps it. She had forgotten to stow it in the checked bag. Went right on through!
 

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While we are ranting about mindlessness:

The school board of in a nearby county has what they call a "zero hand gun tolerance" policy. A few years ago a high school girl received a three day suspension for having a charm of a pistol on her charm bracelet.

How brainless is that?
 

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Funny. My missus and I went though airport security just last week, and when we landed, she noticed her Spyderco Delica 4 in her purse where she always keeps it. She had forgotten to stow it in the checked bag. Went right on through!

Didn't know what that was. Googled it. Cool knife.

Seems like airport security is a joke when they catch an empty casing and shampoo bottles and let that through.
 

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A friend and student, being a federal marshal, is routinely passed through by the TSA screeners with his gun. They won't let him bring along his nail file, however. You can't be too careful when you work for the government. Argus Hamilton, comedian, said, "We all work at least four months out of the year for the government before we can call our money our own. Government workers don't even work four months out of the year for the government.
 

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LOL..... yea, not many paying attention anymore.....and if they are, seem many get SO carried away...... Just glad I have not had to worry about security for over 13 yrs now! ;) However, I did have a court security officer stop me one time because I had a handcuff key on my key ring...... and I told her...thats because they go to my handcuffs....... LMAO! needless to say, she let me through after we had a laugh......
 

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Government workers don't even work four months out of the year for the government.
Ouch....... that hurt my feelings........ :tongue:
There are times that I work four months out of the year.... :wink:
 

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A guy that goes to my church is a pilot. He sent his bag through the xray and did not realize his girlfriend had left a small knife in it. The started grilling him about it. He got made and popped off with one great, though probably inappropriate, reply. The tells the security, "I'm the pilot. If I want to crash this thing I'll just fly it into the ground!" :blink: I think they still took his knife, and they still let him fly the plane.
 

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I carry one of these on my keys
Key Ring Mini-Tool: Utili-Key 6-in-1 - Swiss+Tech
and haven't been stopped or found yet in any security. Federal courthouse, local courthouse, the Gateway arch in St Louis, and various other venues.

I figure the first LEO to find it will get it as a gift for having sharp eyes.
 

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I have a question relating to the shell casing incident. Is a cartridge considered a weapon and /or retricted from carry on baggage? I know the confisticate ammo, as my son forgot a 30-06 round in his pocket when we returned from hunting in Alaska. Actually he passed through detection ion Anchorage and found it before we were to board in Seattle. We contacted an airport screener and they took the cartridge. I didn't quetion it, as the cartridge was no big deal but I guess I never really paid any attention if cartridges are forbidden. Sounds like they are but is that what the law states?
 

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A friend and student, being a federal marshal, is routinely passed through by the TSA screeners with his gun. They won't let him bring along his nail file, however.
LOL! Sorry, but I believe your friend is ribbing you a bit. :wink: That sort of situation has not existed since just after 09/11. Oddly enough, that really was an issue for a short period, however.
Gonzo
 

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When I flew armed, I carried my switchblade. I read later that TSA doesn't want that to happen... oh well.
 

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I've seen the pilot's fingernail clippers taken away, and the response out of earshot was...

"I didn't really need it anyway because....

......I've GOT the CRASH AX and I could just HACK everybody up"



"but I really don't need to do that because.....

I could just CRASH THE F___IN PLANE INTO THE GROUND!"



Then, at Washington Dulles, after 9/11: the National Gaurdsman with his M16 getting WANDED by TSA. That was classic.....



A girl I know (a blonde) went two round trips (four legs total during 2008) from Phoenix to the Midwest forgetting to remove her pepper spray from her key chain all four times (TSA busy with "SILICONE BREACH CHECK PROCEDURE").


It's amazing......
 

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glad he was alert
 
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