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I mostly shoot 9mm (VP9) and .38sp (stainless S&W model 60) and often make a few passes with a .45 cal nylon brush using my cordless drill at low speed. I typically use Hoppes or Balllistol, FWIW.

I've found the nylon brush/drill method very effecient, particularly cleaning the revolver cylinder and haven't noticed any damage to the bores.

What say you?
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Never had a need to use power tools or over sized brushes to clean my guns but, if the method works for you great. I don't think you can hurt anything with nylon but.....
The thing about a proper cleaning rod is it rotates with the rifling as you push it through. That is why the handles rotate. I don't think cleaning 90 degrees against the rifling does any good and with the wrong brush probably could do harm.
 

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Who knows? People do different things.

Im certainly not to zealous about cleaning to desire an attempt at anything beyond simple traditional methods. They have worked well enough for me.
 

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I go by the "you can never be too clean" philosophy. So, your method looks real good to me. But I'll admit that I don't go to those lengths when cleaning my firearms.

1) Copper bore brush with Hoppes #9
2) Same for revolver chambers
3) Run patches through until they come out clean.
4) Run a patch through soaked with CLP
5) Qtips and pipe cleaners to clean out the rest, then a small shot of CLP or RemOil on the moving parts, a thin smear of grease on semiauto slides.

That's worked well for me over the past half century or so.
 

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It's possible a power tool could introduce some heat to the mix - probably not an issue, but something to be aware of. Could also get the steel core of the brush against the cylinder or barrel if it cocks a little and grabs.
 

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The reason they make properly sized brushes is because its the tips of the bristles (be they nylon or brass or copper) that do the cleaning. When you run an oversized brush you lay the tips flat against the bore which is completely the opposite of efficient. Its like laying a broom flat on the floor to sweep.

P.S. Most people over lube and over clean their firearms and by "over clean" I mean completely disassemble way too often and put wear on parts unnecessarily. My guns do not see any metal brushes unless the bore won't come clean with nylon which is extremely rare. I know its only cooper or brass but, why do it as a habit when not needed?
 

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Revolver cylinders, yes. Bores, no.

Over the years I have acquired many used handguns. Very few had ever been properly or thoroughly cleaned. Many have displayed fouling so bad that it required 0000-steel wool wrapped around a worn bore brush, which cuts through the heaviest powder fouling residue and removes barrel leading quickly and with little effort.

I learned this method at Fort Benning, Georgia while on casual status between schools and assigned to the post armory. US and foreign weapons of all types (handguns, rifles, machineguns, up to 25mm anti-armor rifles, everything in between). These were used for training and familiarization for US and foreign troops, quite heavily used and returned to the armory without cleaning. We worked on everything in an assembly line manner, field stripping, bronze and copper brushes, solvents, ultrasonic immersion units, reassembly, inspection, return to secure storage.

Inspections typically included headspace gauges, throat and muzzle erosion measurements, borescope. Not even the crustiest, nastiest examples of Commie-Bloc junk, fired repeatedly and at high cyclic rates with Commie steel jacketed ammo showed any damage from heavy cleaning with 0000-steel wool wrapped on bore brushes.

0000 is the finest grade of steel wool, intended for surface cleaning of metal. It will not damage blued finishes. It will not damage parkerized finishes. It will not damage rifling. It will remove the heaviest powder or lead fouling easily, and it will also remove light surface rust with little effort and without damage to the finish. Fine fibers of the steel wool will remain on the piece, so a thorough cleaning with solvents, brushes, and patches is necessary.

Over 50 years later and I still keep a roll of 0000 in my gun cleaning box.
 

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I don’t do that for a normal cleaning however I had to on my M19-4 as whoever owned it before me only shot .38 through it. .357Mag would drop in but the empty would stick on the carbon ring.

ETA: I only did that on the cylinder not in the barrel.
 

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Revolver cylinders, yes. Bores, no.

Over the years I have acquired many used handguns. Very few had ever been properly or thoroughly cleaned. Many have displayed fouling so bad that it required 0000-steel wool wrapped around a worn bore brush, which cuts through the heaviest powder fouling residue and removes barrel leading quickly and with little effort.

I learned this method at Fort Benning, Georgia while on casual status between schools and assigned to the post armory. US and foreign weapons of all types (handguns, rifles, machineguns, up to 25mm anti-armor rifles, everything in between). These were used for training and familiarization for US and foreign troops, quite heavily used and returned to the armory without cleaning. We worked on everything in an assembly line manner, field stripping, bronze and copper brushes, solvents, ultrasonic immersion units, reassembly, inspection, return to secure storage.

Inspections typically included headspace gauges, throat and muzzle erosion measurements, borescope. Not even the crustiest, nastiest examples of Commie-Bloc junk, fired repeatedly and at high cyclic rates with Commie steel jacketed ammo showed any damage from heavy cleaning with 0000-steel wool wrapped on bore brushes.

0000 is the finest grade of steel wool, intended for surface cleaning of metal. It will not damage blued finishes. It will not damage parkerized finishes. It will not damage rifling. It will remove the heaviest powder or lead fouling easily, and it will also remove light surface rust with little effort and without damage to the finish. Fine fibers of the steel wool will remain on the piece, so a thorough cleaning with solvents, brushes, and patches is necessary.

Over 50 years later and I still keep a roll of 0000 in my gun cleaning box.
A much better way (despite what the Army says) is copper cleaning pads made of real copper not the steel stuff with copper coating. Pull out some strands and wrap around a worn bore brush. No need for drills. It comes out in flakes very quickly because the copper is very fine flat wire and you don't have steel in your barrel and you don't have the dang mess of tiny little steel strands everywhere that can get into the works and really screw things up. No need to clean all that crap out either. You may not notice the rifling damage from steel on steel in two lifetimes but, its happening just the same. Keep steel out of your barrel.
 

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My K98K RC that I got for cheap because it had a helpless "sewer pipe bore" required a couple hours of intense cleaning, including using .338 bore brushes on a cordless drill, but it now has a "good bore" with just some light frosting in the grooves. I think it was a combo of carbon fouling, cosmoline and dried yak urine. No bad for a 1940 Mauser production rifle and veteran of the Eastern Front.
 
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Its just not that deep Bro.. I perform one twist of the wrist as I push the brush through the barrel. I twist the thing maybe 3 to 3.5 times and do the same thing when I pull the brush backward. Thats it.

I am not one who treats my firearms like they are medical equipment and I do not let the buildup get so bad as to need any elaborate cleaning rituals.

I personally believe that more damage has been done to barrels by way of overzealous and improper cleaning methods than any other means.

Needless to say, I aint about to put a brush on the end of a power tool.
 

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I have used the OP's method for cleaning chambers, and shotgun barrels. Shotgun barrels get that plastic fouling from the wads. And the newer guns that have spray on finishes get some over spray in there chambers that when they are hot make ejection difficult. The finish gets hot a softens enough to grab the empty hull. A few min with a cleaning brush wrapped with either a copper pad or steel wool cleans up the chambers nicely. The use of a drill puts a high polish on them. But I don't think I would run the drill down a rifled barrel. That would be forcing the brush to skip over the rifling instead of following the grooves down the bore. DR
 

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Wouldn’t use the described method without removing the cylinder from the frame. Drill and hand pressure adds weight. That force has to go somewhere which is the crane arm. An easily damaged part.

Nylon brushes have always been effective for me. Occasionally a bronze brush for heavy lead build up. Mostly in a revolver the forcing cone takes the brunt of things. I use a bronze brush occasionally and only on stainless.
 
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I've applied Flitz to a bore mop to polish chambers a time or two, but for regular cleaning, I don't see the necessity or need for a drill.
 
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