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Yep and I wore OD post Vietnam. Our winter gear was from Korean war vintage.
The only winter gear I was ever issued was a Navy Peacoat. I got on the plane the first week of February in San Diego at around 70 degrees and got off in Chicago with below zero temperature, inches of snow on the ground, and high winds. I thought I was going to die and the Peacoat wasn't helping.
 

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The only winter gear I was ever issued was a Navy Peacoat. I got on the plane the first week of February in San Diego at around 70 degrees and got off in Chicago with below zero temperature, inches of snow on the ground, and high winds. I thought I was going to die and the Peacoat wasn't helping.
Well I was standing in a gun jeep in Germany, in the winter doing convoy security for Nukes we were moving. That crappy gear did not help much.
 

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I’ve chucked a brush in my drill from time to time. Probably wouldn’t do it to a match grade rifle barrel, but it didn’t hurt my Glock or Shield.
 

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I have never used a drill motor but I do use an air compressor to help blow crud and stuff out of tight spots. I will think about your method and maybe give it a try.
 

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I loved those old jungle fatigues.
 

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Just use the proper chemical and let it do the cleaning for you. Using a drill to spin your brush is going to do an inferior job and potentially do more harm than good to your barrel and crown than just using the correct bore solvent designed to remove carbon and copper.
 

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I go by the "you can never be too clean" philosophy. So, your method looks real good to me. But I'll admit that I don't go to those lengths when cleaning my firearms.

1) Copper bore brush with Hoppes #9
2) Same for revolver chambers
3) Run patches through until they come out clean.
4) Run a patch through soaked with CLP
5) Qtips and pipe cleaners to clean out the rest, then a small shot of CLP or RemOil on the moving parts, a thin smear of grease on semiauto slides.

That's worked well for me over the past half century or so.
Same except for the soaked part in 4). Just enough oil to put a thin protective coat on the bore.
 

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You may not be the only one who uses a drill with oversize brushes, but I'd say you are definitely in the minority. I've just never had my guns so dirty I couldn't get them sparkling with more conventional methods.
 

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Same except for the soaked part in 4). Just enough oil to put a thin protective coat on the bore.
I have found that here in sunny--and humid--S. FL, everything I used CLP on gets gummy. I don't use it anymore. It completely gummed up my 788 enough to cause misfires. And I don't use it liberally either.
 

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As Tim the Tool Man Taylor used to say "grunt, More Power!!! grunt, grunt" - what could possibly go wrong? I don't know, but something always does. I don't think I would trust myself.
 

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Every once in a blue moon Ill pull a bore snake through the bore of a gun. Other than that, I just wipe the majority of the crud build up off the easy to get to places and then keep it lubed.
 

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Yes, a nylon brush itself shouldn't cause any issues, but the problem is, there is debris in the bore leftover from firing. That debris can be abrasive, and spinning a nylon brush around with the debris doesn't sound like a good idea.
 
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