Defensive Carry banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,607 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When shooting from a static position unsupported you want a structure that will transmit the recoil of the weapon into the ground. It is the same principle as a reverse punch in karate just in the reverse. Power flows up from the ground in one case and down into the ground in another.

In this and cases where you are moving but not dynamically (steady-state or stop-start) it helps to be able to set the grip from the shoulder out. This exercise, a Reverse Kettlebell Shoulder Press, will help you develop strength from shoulder to hand so you can do that and set yourself to more easily route the recoil impulse through your structure to the ground.

You will need either a kettlebell or a dumbbell small enough to hold by one end (start light with this because of the need to get balance correctly). Take the kettlebell up and set it upside-down (bottom pointing directly up) at shoulder level and press directly upward and back for your chosen number of repetitions. Shift to the other side and repeat. With a dumbbell you will have to hold it by one end and balance it vertically. It's easier and I think does move for the grip to use a kettlebell for this one.

The difference between this and a standard dumbell shoulder press is the additional emphasis it puts on the forearm/wrist/hand because of the need to keep the kettlebell reversed vertically. This should translate pretty well into a better grip, better set and structure from shoulder to hand, and better recoil management when shooting handguns.

Kettlebell Reverse Shoulder Press combo reduced.jpg

This is what it looks like. Note the position of the kettlebell. This is why it works the hand, wrist and forearm like it does. You could do this with a dumbbell if you balance it vertically. Standard dumbbell presses won't work the forearms, wrists and hands like this does.

Note: This is the lightest kettlebell I have and when I started this I did five repetitions. That was all I could handle at the time. I'm doing better now. Start light with this and make sure of control of the weight throughout the movement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,102 Posts
Hrm. I don't have a kettlebell, but I do have a set of dumbbells with removable plates. I could mimic the same move by putting the plates on only one end, and hold it by the unweighted end.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gatorbait51

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I may be able to modify this to something useful by laying on my back and pressing in a bench-press move. Having had shoulder surgery (both shoulders) and talking to both my surgeon and therapist, overhead presses are frowned upon as a repetitive exercise (unless overhead work in a job is required - such as a pipe fitter was given as an example). Being retired allows me the comfort of no longer being in a position of tearing up my body for a paycheck, so following instructions from someone that's worked on my body to keep me in the game is probably a good idea. :) The kettle-bell is a great idea for working the stabilizers through the arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
As an avid weight lifter/strength power type lifter I can really attest to being stronger helps me shoot. recoil and fatigue rarely effect my shooting, but it took a lot of sweat to get there. I would really second the OP's suggestion that if you shoot do some exercising too. if you cannot get to a gym do push ups and curl pillow cases filled with cans or rocks, whatever you can find. arm and shoulder strength really will aid in your shooting ability. The work outs do not need to be intense just enough to stimulate your body will help. Anything is better then sitting in front of the computer all day or flipping the ol TV remote. take 20 30 mins and DO IT!
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top