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Discussion Starter #1
I hope this is the right forum to post this as it seemed the best suited for my quandary. (yup, I do use that word)

Let me preface. I have fired firearms before, so this isn't my first time at the rodeo. That being said, it has been a very long time since the last time I did fire one.(not counting my recent failed attempts) My first shot is almost always in the black at 25 feet, but each subsequent shot is hard pressed to find the target. I can tell right off the bat that I am anticipating the gun going off, and everything I've read so far online confirms that I am. (always low and left) I really need some help from someone that knows what he or she is doing because at this point, I'm just carrying a loud noise maker that is only a real danger to myself. (Unless I pull a Superman and throw the gun at my target. I'm more accurate that way.)

Any tips, tricks, or methods I could practice in order to stop myself from anticipating each shot? Classes in my area maybe? (Massachusetts/New Hampshire area)

Thanks guys
Matt
 

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Try dry firing with a dime or penny on the top of the slide or barrel, the goal is to pull the trigger with out moving the weapon and causing the coin to fall. Builds muscle memory. Be sure to aim the weapon(in a safe direction) at a (safe) target.
 

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Advice I always fall back on to combat flinching is "let the shot surprise you". Every shot should be like the first you ever took. Second one is "smoothly squeeze, not jerk, the trigger". The third is "hold your breath during your exhale then shoot". These three simple rules always gets me back to center.
 

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This is not a brush off, but a good instructor can have you corrected in about 10 minutes. Check with you LGS for an instructor and see if he/she cant help you. It work the time and the money.

Tip: Take your first shot. Relax, then sight back in, close your eyes, take the next shot. See were it hits. Continue to do this. A lot of time the visual shock of recoil will make you flinch.
 

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1. lots of GOOD dry-fire. Practice does NOT make perfect. PERFECT practice makes perfect. A fair number is 100 GOOD dry-fires for every live fire round.
2. sight alignment and trigger control is a LEARNED skill. You are not born with it but it CAN be learned. Don't get discouraged.
3. follow through is not just for golfers. There are TWO sight pictures for EVERY shot.

Without being there to see exactly what you are doing, we are just making educated guesses. An experienced shooting partner or, better yet, a professional trainer, at your side would be your best bet.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks gang. Solid advice. As far as the loads I am using, they are target loads from whatever brand I can find on a shelf. (most commonly American Eagle from Federal I think.) I'm pretty sure they are 25 grain. (I am currently out of them at the moment) The lack of available ammunition is making practice much more difficult.
 

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Thanks gang. Solid advice. As far as the loads I am using, they are target loads from whatever brand I can find on a shelf. (most commonly American Eagle from Federal I think.) I'm pretty sure they are 25 grain. (I am currently out of them at the moment) The lack of available ammunition is making practice much more difficult.
I was asking for caliber and size of weapon. I had to break some bad habits after too many .357's out of a 2" snubby.
 

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someone in another thread recommended dry firing with a laser, which will let you see exactly how and when your muzzle is moving. sounds like a good idea.
And if you don't want to attach a laser grip, there are little laser pointers for dry firing that you stick into the barrel. There are several brands. I haven't used any of them, and I'm not sure how much they cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ah, sorry about that TDave. I'm using an H&K P30s 9mm
 

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AFTER doing the dry fire exercises and possible after consulting an instructor, get some snap caps. Have someone else load your mags with some live rounds and some snap caps. Mix it up. Then you will know if you are anticipating the bang and the recoil because they have neither.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks again guys. I'm going to give all the dry fire techniques a try as I don't currently have any ammunition. Hopefully I will be able to improve my aim. I'm trying to find a decent class in my area, but most of the ones I've found seem kind of sketchy.
 

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If they haven't outlawed the NRA in your area, look up, on the NRA site, a basic pistol class. You need work on the fundamentals and this class will help you. Doing things on your own and doing them all day won't help if your doing it wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If they haven't outlawed the NRA in your area, look up, on the NRA site, a basic pistol class. You need work on the fundamentals and this class will help you. Doing things on your own and doing them all day won't help if your doing it wrong.
I've already taken the basic pistol class, it's actually required to get your LTC in MA. I shoot just fine with my Stepfather's SIG 1911 .22. I think I just need a lot more practice with my own weapon, and the techniques you guys have given me might go a long way to helping me.
 

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I think your pistol is defective, and is causing you tremendous mental anguish. Given that consideration, I think you should get rid of that useless firearm as soon as possible. I would suggest you merely throw it into the nearest river, but that would create the possibility someone else might acquire it, and suffer the same mental anguish.

Since you sound like a fairly nice fellow, I would offer to sacrifice myself on the HK altar and offer to let you send the offending paperweight to me. Of course, while I am willing to take on the mental burden of having an HK that won't shoot straight, I must insist you cover all shipping and transfer costs.

There is a possibility that once your useless P30S spends a little time next to my P30S, some of my pistol's accuracy may rub off on it.

Please understand, I do not volunteer to take on this burden lightly. Feel free to call me with any questions at BR-549

If you feel your P30S affliction can be alleviated through therapy, then, by all means, feel free to contact the nearest professional and allow him to enrich himself while curing your HK malady.

Good luck.
 

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I would recommend laser dry-fire training. You can see where you are hitting and get the muscle memory of getting on target each and every time. There are many systems out there to help you out.
 

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Good Post I can sympathise with you. Some of the people I went through Bootcamp with had the same problem and the corrective measures used by my DI are not what you need.

Patience is the thing hardest for me to learn. The instructor is you best bet. If you are shooting at a range with a shelf or bench in front of you try lowering the gun and resting it on the shelf. After several deep breaths raise the gun into firing position and as the sights line up on the target start applying pressure to the trigger until as said before you are totally surprised when the gun goes off. Some control their breathing by inhaling and then letting out half of the breath and holding it until you fire the shot.
 

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...DetChris said exactly what I always teach people..."let the shot surprise you"...on the range, start squeezing and don't even THINK "NOW"...squeeze steadily and smoothly till it fires...

...at home...AFTER CHECKING MAGAZINE AND BARREL.. aim in a safe direction and close your eyes...squeeeeeeeeeeeeeze off about 100 shots...feeling, not seeing, what's happening...you'll learn the FEEL of the gun and trigger...soon, you'll KNOW when it's going to pop...and your hand/eye coordination will actually steady the gun just before it fires...you'll stop flinching...every woman I've ever had fire a handgun who had never done it before did well by just "letting the shot surprise you"...
 
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