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Has anybody in Iraq/Afgahnistan worked with the French Foreign Legion? One of my good friends, the always testing his limits types, is considering joining the Legion after his 8 years in the Army (2 months). Just curious what you think/thought.
 

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JMHO, but Legionnaires are the hardest out there. We were trained by four of them in Central America for three days, and we learned more from them than two weeks from the Philippine mountain men in J.E.S.T.

I'm no Spec Op guy, and I wouldn't say that I liked a single one of them. BUT, they are Professionals and know how to execute what needs to be done at the second it needs to be done.

At the major cutbacks in '92 I looked at the FFL, but the pay was less than 2/3 and they are stationed in the most remote places.h
 

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A lot of FFL in Africa, and the French didn't exactly build up their colonies.

My only experience is that the squadron secretary's son and his buddy (in HS at the time) ran away from home "to join the FFL" in around 2000. They were apprehended and returned home safely. :)

Good luck to your buddy.
 

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I had to resond, no experience, but why would he / she do that?
He heard they were some of the toughest men in the world and wanted to serve with them I suppose. Plus he went through ROTC and didn't exactly get to choose his job in the Army. The guy runs double marathons and benches 245, but hardly ever gets put in a position to use his combat skills. When I asked him the same thing... why?..., he basically said "I'm a race horse giving pony rides" (his version was much more colorful.)
 

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I hope he speaks french.

I believe they are extremely "Hardcore".

Knew a guy who said that he was looking for a challenge as well, He was in the Army (Spec Ops) and Marine (Force Recon) thought they were not to his higher standard.

Never found out if he made it in or not. I know he was studying French as it was required back then.

Tell him good luck and grow thick skinned!

Out of all the French military, they are the only ones I respected.
 

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I served with several during a number of joint exercises. They always struck me as professional, smart and tough. Not a whole lot different than the Marines I served with every day.

Fluency in French used to be a requirement, I don't know if it still is though.
 

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Having looked into it, to each their own, but I would have my doubts concerning a U.S. citizen who joined. It is not evil or unhonorable. It is about the same as someone who renounces their citizenship. Just not something I respect. Unpatriotic.
 

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Having looked into it, to each their own, but I would have my doubts concerning a U.S. citizen who joined. It is not evil or unhonorable. It is about the same as someone who renounces their citizenship. Just not something I respect. Unpatriotic.
Joining the Légion étrangère does not mean someone automatically renounces their U.S. citizenship, nor is it necessarily an unpatriotic act. In fact, there is long historical precedent for Americans serving under foreign flags for quite patriotic reasons. Consider the Lafayette Escadrille, the Eagle Squadron and the American Volunteer Group.
 

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Joining the Légion étrangère does not mean someone automatically renounces their U.S. citizenship, nor is it necessarily an unpatriotic act. In fact, there is long historical precedent for Americans serving under foreign flags for quite patriotic reasons. Consider the Lafayette Escadrille, the Eagle Squadron and the American Volunteer Group.
I know history and I understand you do not necessarily renounce you citizenship. On this forum there are many times people point to a view expressed by the media or groups of people as unamerican or unpatriotic. I stated nothing with certainty, only expressed doubts.

...It is about the same as someone who renounces their citizenship...Unpatriotic.
"About the same" is not "the same." To a greater degree than the norm, a U.S. citizen who serves the legion, is placing the interests of France before U.S. interests. Often those interests are the same, however you are taking an oath to serve in a military, that could conflict with U.S. interests. It is not the same as say working for a French company.

I balanced my previous post appropriately.
 

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I know history and I understand you do not necessarily renounce you citizenship. On this forum there are many times people point to a view expressed by the media or groups of people as unamerican or unpatriotic. I stated nothing with certainty, only expressed doubts.

"About the same" is not "the same." To a greater degree than the norm, a U.S. citizen who serves the legion, is placing the interests of France before U.S. interests. Often those interests are the same, however you are taking an oath to serve in a military, that could conflict with U.S. interests. It is not the same as say working for a French company.

I balanced my previous post appropriately.
Serving in the Legion is not "about the same" as renouncing your citizenship. In fact, it's nowhere near the unpatriotic act of renouncing your citizenship. I'd suggest your language was less balanced than you realize.

I'd also suggest that there's a much greater probability that a French company would work against U.S. interests than the French military.
 

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Well, you and I see things differently. A U.S. citizen taking an oath to a foreign military is a questionable act IMO, and while not unpatriot in and of itself, for me, places doubts about that person's patriotism. It is very different then say working as a sales rep for a foreign manufacturer or purchasing a foreign made product.

For example, I would not vote for someone at the federal level who has served in French Foreign Legion in the past 40 years. They may or may not be good people, but not who I want in office. I don't want to be accused of hijacking the thread or trolling, I leave it to you to have the last word or perhaps to start a new thread. I don't have much more to offer on the topic.
 

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I had an uncle that joined. He wasnt the sharpest tool in the shed, and tried to desert the Legion. He ended up well less then able after his punishment after they caught him. The Legion is not timid in anything. He didnt lose his US citizenship, but he paid in other ways.
 

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Traditionally they'll teach you French. I know a guy who served in the FFL, decades ago. He fought in Algeria and came out a mess, homeless and heroin addicted. Tough dude and he learned french from them but they sure did make a mess of him. He eventually put himself back together with the help of a very wonderful woman.
 

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MY Friend joined in the 80's , he said they were great in the field, but Garrison was hell. Lot's of people who had rank that should not of.
 

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Well, you and I see things differently. A U.S. citizen taking an oath to a foreign military is a questionable act IMO, and while not unpatriot in and of itself, for me, places doubts about that person's patriotism. It is very different then say working as a sales rep for a foreign manufacturer or purchasing a foreign made product.
You do know that the U.S. military accepts those of foreign citizenship too, don't you?
 

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I won't go into the whole story. But +1 on speaking French or the lessons are going to be very painful. Very serious on this one.
 

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You do know that the U.S. military accepts those of foreign citizenship too, don't you?
Yes, and after their service, if they would want to become U.S. citizens, I would not be inclined to doubt their patriotism to the U.S. But, for me, a U.S. citizen who joins a foreign military, I have my doubts about their loyalty to this country. Both could be good people, as I've stated. Nothing inconsistent with what I've stated.

I have no problem with a person who, for example, who joins the french foreign legion, and after there term, becomes a french citizen (or not). I will initially assume they lack loyalty to U.S. interests.
 

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tempers people, tempers
 
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