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OK, you got me!

What a great piece of history you've got there. It looks like it's never been issued. I've only handled and fired one once that belonged to a friend but it was smooth operating and very accurate, putting all it's rounds into virtually one hole at a hundred yards. I was impressed!
 

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Hah!

Got ya' on the appearance of that rifle as well Hoganberg for it is my first center fire rifle and was used for deer hunting rifle in my teen years, was used for some years in high-power competition, served for many years as test bed for experimental .30-06 "performance" hand loading, and has spent 45 years now being shot just for fun off the bench and in the field. A lot of rounds have been poured through that one. It's still as accurate as you describe your '03A3 experience was.


It's an early one with a serial number not far from the beginning of the block assigned to Smith Corona and having a six-groove barrel dated two months after Smith Corona started up production. The barrel is marked Smith Corona, but it is said that High Standard provided just a few thousand six groove barrels to Smith Corona to help things get started. The bulk of Smith Corona '03A3s will be seen with 4-groove barrels. The 2-groove '03A3 barrels were a Remington cost/efficiency measure developed, but they only show up on Remington produced '03A3s. Had one once. It was nearly as accurate as this Smith Corona.

It's only conjecture, but I suspect this rifle was stored unused through the War as a barreled action not assembled, later to be assembled using a scant grip stock which was a Remington development and would be considered by collectors to be incorrect on my rifle and sold as a DCM gun in the 1950s or early 1960s. I ran across it in 1975 at Prince Jewelry & Loan, a pawn shop in downtown Fort Worth near the bank where I worked right out of high school. I don't care for the scant grip stock, but I suspect that's the way it mustered out of service so I've always left it alone.

Scant grip stocks were made up using straight grip '03 stock blanks but in a 1903 Type C pistol grip stock profiler. Hence the abbreviated pistol grip. A wartime expedient. I'm thinking all scant grip stocks were replacement stocks.

The original lower band and sling swivel screw which had seen the competition on the high-power firing line with the stress of the use of a very tight sling later failed on me a few years ago.

I'd decided to again take the '03A3 deer hunting, for old time's sake. Just as I reached a deer blind after climbing to the top of a live oak tree on our old place on the lake, the rifle fell away from from my back and bounced and slid from limb to limb down through the tree to the ground. There were tears in my eyes as I clamored down to inspect the ruination that I expected to find on my old favorite. Imagine my surprise and delight when it was discovered to have no damage. The accessory front sight hood snapped off and was lost, but both hood and a replacement sling swivel were no big deal to replace. The stock had long scuffs on it from where the rifle slid through the limbs against the rough bark, but the scuffs just wiped off with a thumb and the walnut was not bruised in the least. Should have checked and replaced the worn band and screw long before the incident. How I got off so lucky I can't say.

Laid the rifle across the bench rest a few days later to verify the sights and it was still sighted in.

 

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Hah!

Got ya' on the appearance of that rifle as well Hoganberg for it is my first center fire rifle and was used for deer hunting rifle in my teen years, was used for some years in high-power competition, served for many years as test bed for experimental .30-06 "performance" hand loading, and has spent 45 years now being shot just for fun off the bench and in the field. A lot of rounds have been poured through that one. It's still as accurate as you describe your '03A3 experience was.

The original lower band and sling swivel screw which had seen the competition on the high-power firing line with the stress of the use of a very tight sling later failed on me a few years ago.

I'd decided to again take the '03A3 deer hunting, for old time's sake. Just as I reached a deer blind after climbing to the top of a live oak tree on our old place on the lake, the rifle fell away from from my back and bounced and slid from limb to limb down through the tree to the ground. There were tears in my eyes as I clamored down to inspect the ruination that I expected to find on my old favorite. Imagine my surprise and delight when it was discovered to have no damage. The accessory front sight hood snapped off and was lost, but both hood and a replacement sling swivel were no big deal to replace. The stock had long scuffs on it from where the rifle slid through the limbs against the rough bark, but the scuffs just wiped off with a thumb and the walnut was not bruised in the least. Should have checked and replaced the worn band and screw long before the incident. How I got off so lucky I can't say.

Laid the rifle across the bench rest a few days later to verify the sights and it was still sighted in.

I am happy to see another rifleman who knows how to properly use a "shooting sling". Your sitting position is pretty good, but your elbows really should be over the knees. Staff Sergeant Gilcrest would not be pleased, probably require a hundred pushups just for allowing yourself to be photographed that way, might even emphasize his lecture by thumping his forefinger on your dog tags and driving them into your breastbone to make sure he had your full attention (ask me how I know that).

Nice 03-A3! Thanks for sharing!
 

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Go easy on me!

I couldn't accomplish a hundred pushups between now and next week! I probably couldn't bend enough to lean forward there in that photo with a tight gun belt and more lbs around the middle then than I have now. Might could lean forward enough now. Never heard that one's elbows needed to be over the knees which seems somehow less stable to me than elbows firmly planted.

I'll have to try that tomorrow.

Of course that is just an expedient M1 web sling, but it's so tight that if one was to push down on the muzzle end of the rifle they could just tip me over the edge of the rim and into the canyon and I would stay in the same position.

Was going to attend a high-power match or two this season beginning in March, but Corona of a pervasive sort compelled the club high-power match director to cancel matches for the time being.

https://www.everydaymarksman.co/marksmanship/sitting-position-rifle/

There are some weird and wacky sitting positions depicted in this Google Images search. Elbows waiving around out in space, ARs canted to one side gangsta' style, sloppiness abounding.

https://www.google.com/search?q=rifle+competition+sitting+position&client=firefox-b-1-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjSze3w1NDoAhVBcq0KHRVpBP8Q_AUoAXoECAsQAw&biw=1274&bih=821
 

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Go easy on me!

I couldn't accomplish a hundred pushups between now and next week! I probably couldn't bend enough to lean forward there in that photo with a tight gun belt and more lbs around the middle then than I have now. Might could lean forward enough now. Never heard that one's elbows needed to be over the knees which seems somehow less stable to me than elbows firmly planted.

I'll have to try that tomorrow.

Of course that is just an expedient M1 web sling, but it's so tight that if one was to push down on the muzzle end of the rifle they could just tip me over the edge of the rim and into the canyon and I would stay in the same position.

Was going to attend a high-power match or two this season beginning in March, but Corona of a pervasive sort compelled the club high-power match director to cancel matches for the time being.

https://www.everydaymarksman.co/marksmanship/sitting-position-rifle/

There are some weird and wacky sitting positions depicted in this Google Images search. Elbows waiving around out in space, ARs canted to one side gangsta' style, sloppiness abounding.

https://www.google.com/search?q=rifle+competition+sitting+position&client=firefox-b-1-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjSze3w1NDoAhVBcq0KHRVpBP8Q_AUoAXoECAsQAw&biw=1274&bih=821
I was just giving you a hard time, friend! I doubt I could get my elbows over the knees to Staff Sergeant Gilcrest's satisfaction anymore. Use of the shooting sling is becoming a lost art, from what I have seen in recent years. One of the most basic parts of rifle training, back in my Army days.
 

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I was just giving you a hard time, friend! I doubt I could get my elbows over the knees to Staff Sergeant Gilcrest's satisfaction anymore. Use of the shooting sling is becoming a lost art, from what I have seen in recent years. One of the most basic parts of rifle training, back in my Army days.
Well I wouldn't know how to act if someone wasn't giving me a hard time.

Love slings! Never got into the bipods.

This is a proper sling. Oh yes, and a proper rifle as well.

 

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Very nice looking rifles. Hi power taught me to place elbows slightly inside my knees for better stability ,however I never learned other than from civilian instructors/coaches.
 

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Yep, I remember typwriters

Top to bottom: Smith Corona, Underwood, and Remington Rand. All Typwriters.

And they all can "type up a storm."



 

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Yes sir, I have the sickness.

Mine was a gift to me from a Marine Capt, who’s son was my best friend. He gifted it to me after his son died, and told me that his son use to shoot this rifle down in Texas where they lived when he was young.

Unfortunately , the rifle had been “ sport-ized “ with the stock cut back when he received it.

The story is, when he was a young USMC Lt, the Army was loading a bunch of them in a bin to be destroyed sometime in the 50’s, when some young Marines saw an opportunity, and requisitioned them. One of his young Marines asked him if he would like a hunting rifle, free of charge as long as he didn’t ask any questions, so obviously this was agreeable to him.

Because the stock had been cut down just forward of the band holding the sling, over time it could no longer be tightened enough to hold the wooden barrel guard in place during recoil, or carried with the sling.
So, I placed a screw on each side to hold it in place.

However , I cherish the rifle for what it is, and the sentimental value it has. I feel like I am shooting with my old friend every time I send rounds down range.

I use a soft point 165 weight bullet loaded to just over 2400 fps. Off the bench at 100 yards I can hold 2 inch groups on a good day.

I have also loaded 30-30 bullets of 150 weight with the same charge, and it shoots them very well, and has a great effect on white tail deer.

The rifle does duty as a travel gun also when I want to have access to a long gun on trips away from home.....I’d just as soon have it as anything else:)
A7A19A57-3DDD-47D5-9A15-3E9360308B10.jpeg 921ACAB2-750D-43AA-8AED-1381C29B7C1D.jpeg
 

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How many words per minute can you punch out with that Smith Corona?
Don't know. Never counted them. I do know it'll punch through four Fort Worth phone books with 180 grain Sierra soft point spitzers. Never tried it on phone books with ball or AP.

Chuck;

That's a very clean rifle. It could of course be restored with a correct stock set and associated hardware. That reformed hand guard almost has an M1 Carbine hand guard look about it. Your rifle truly has an appealing look about it as it is and just might be particularly accurate without the extra length of hand guard, stacking swivel hardware and bayonet lug.

Always liked the sight arrangement on the '03A3 rifles. Simple, but very adjustable within its range, repeatable and consistent, and sturdy, the sights are quite agreeable with the eye. I've never felt particularly hampered by not having a scope when using the '03A3. Tightest center fire rifle group I've ever fired off the bench rest was with my Smith Corona. Prepared hand loads went into 1.1 inches at 100 yards for five shots. 1 1/4 inches off the bench is no sweat. I've taken deer with the rifle out to 150 steps.

The earlier Springfield Model 1903 sight is more precise, but is more fiddly and I don't feel it is quite as durable, and because its aperture is in front of the receiver requires a little more care to find in a hurry.

I've never found U.S. military rifles to be slouches with regards to accuracy in their original configurations when used thoughtfully, with all good attention given to shooting technique. Actually my dad's M1 Carbine's about the worst offender I've ever seen, grouping about 3 1/2 inches at 100 yards. My ol' ratty Underwood Carbine will do 2-inches.

Both the Model 1917 Enfield and the Krag Jorgensen here will shoot under 2-inches at 100 yards as will the Trapdoor Springfield. The Trapdoor requires smokeless loads in order to shoot well. For a rifle that firmly dates from the black powder era, it is one spoiled brat. Having once experienced smokeless powder it was having no more of that nasty charcoal stuff. Smokeless powder and the ease of jacketed .45-70 bullets and "ya' just can't keep them down on the farm any longer."
 

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@bmcgilvray- When I was traipsing all over the Middle East, my constant companion was a particularly accurate M-16A4 manufactured by FN. Using the irons and a nice tight sling, I could shoot occasional cloverleaf groups from the sitting position at 200 yards. When they issued me an ACOG, it became even easier. I dubbed her Matilda, because she could waltz with the best of them, and because I belonged to the 1st Marine Division.
 
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