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On another forum, a guy said he sprayed the firing pin hole with gun scrubber and a lot of junk washed out. Shreds of brass etc. this was in a kahr cm9. This runs against every practice I've ever heard.
Aren't you supposed to remove the firing pin, clean it & run it dry?

Anyone else do this?
 

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NO.
 

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Me either.
 

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Took apart the firing pin and ejector on my 1911 a month or so ago- cleaned out (what seemed like) enough crap to keep the firing pin from even fitting in there with it. It stopped throwing brass back at my face, and runs a lot smoother now.

As for my striker fired pistols, I never did anything like that because I didn't want to mess anything up (break that one piece of something loose to get caught in a spring or something), so I never tried it. - It seems to me to be like servicing an automatic transmission; either do it often, or not at all- none of that half-way 'it's been 200,000 miles, I should probably change my fluid and filter' stuff. Then you have to start replacing major components (transmission) because it breaks up all that nasty stuff that's built up and clogs or sticks in other things that are supposed to move freely.
 

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Yes, I've done that with my S&W 3rd Gens but not with my Glock. The Glock slide is much easier to break down for cleaning. Use a cleaner that leaves no residue (Brakeclean, gun scrubber, etc.).

The brass shavings are indicative of sharp edges on the firing pin hole shaving the case base as it slides up. It needs to be dehorned (chamfered), particularly on the top side. The shavings can cause light strikes or jam up the firing pin entirely.
 

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I actually had a Ruger M77 .30-06 that got completely tied up while sighting in the day before I was leaving to go deer hunting by a tiny shaving of brass that worked its way into the bolt through the firing pin hole. Was amazed how small a piece this was and how thoroughly it shut down the rifle.

It's not beyond the realm of possibility that the same thing could occur with a handgun. Keep the dedicated self-defense handgun properly lubricated and also detail strip it infrequently to make certain that there's been no accumulation of gunk.
 

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I actually had a Ruger M77 .30-06 that got completely tied up while sighting in the day before I was leaving to go deer hunting by a tiny shaving of brass that worked its way into the bolt through the firing pin hole. Was amazed how small a piece this was and how thoroughly it shut down the rifle.

It's not beyond the realm of possibility that the same thing could occur with a handgun. Keep the dedicated self-defense handgun properly lubricated and also detail strip it infrequently to make certain that there's been no accumulation of gunk.
This is also why one should be careful not to over lubricate a firearm.
 
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