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Anyone here own or know a lot about the British Webley Mark VI revolver?

I'm really intrigued by them and I'm thinking of trying to get one.

How do they shoot? Big recoil? How's maintenance on them?
 

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Indiana Jones used one. All you need to know. You want it!

*OD and bmcgilvray got em. wmhawth doesn't?!?!? I dont believe it!
 
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I traded an excellent chainsaw for a 38S&W Webley in 2001. It had the recoil of a 22. Mine was pristine for an Allied sidearm of WWII. Wish I still had it.
 
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More About Webleys Than You Ever Cared To Know












Webley Mark IV .455 made in 1899. A private purchase rather than a British issue revolver, which at the time would have looked the same only with military acceptance stamps. Likely was an officer purchase when he was gathering his "kit" to deploy to the subcontinent. Was original sold through the Army & Navy Cooperative Society London Ltd., an outfit once much used by British officers who had to support their equipment needs, and so marked on the top of the barrel rib. Shabby condition but an uncommon variant. Probably one of the more colorful firearms around here, if it could only talk it likely could really tell some stories. How it ended up in the Dallas Market Hall gun show for me to purchase will probably never be known


Some effort was expended a few years back to research this old revolver and a kindly authority sent me a photograph of the actual ledger entry where it was sold at Army & Navy. You're better than I am if you can successfully interpret what it says.





A Webley, also termed a Mark IV but built on a smaller frame and was supplied to the British and Commonwealth armed services during World War II. This is chambered for .38/200 otherwise known over here as the .38 S&W. The service loading consisted of a heavier bullet, weighing 178 grains and being jacketed to comply with Hague accords. The first loading used a really heavy 200 grain lead bullet but activists of the age felt like it was inhumane for civilized nations to fight using expanding lead projectiles (among other things). This one was produced in either 1943 or 1944. I don't have notes at hand and can't recall.

The Webley revolvers are all extremely well thought out designs and are very well made. A topbreak design, they are much sturdier than the 19th century topbreak designs such as Smith & Wesson and others produced here in the U.S.. Funny looking to our eyes, they are ergonomically wonderful to grasp and to shoot, whether they are of the birdshead configuration or the square butt configuration. They are capable of of being very accurate if care is given to assembling correct handloads that mimic original ballistics. Webleys have great "pointing' capabilities for instinctive shooting. Recoil of the big .455 is very pleasant, partially due to it's good ergonomics. The .38/200 Webleys are very mild to shoot. British service Webleys of the past century and a quarter have been double-action revolvers. The internals look very much like a classic Colt action with a V-spring powering the hammer and trigger return. Double-action feel is much the same as a Colt with some stacking evident in the trigger as it is pulled to the rear. The trigger is very crisp when the revolver is used in single-action mode.

The Webley revolvers are fast to operate. The latch is easy to use and is well-placed for access by the thumb. No manual manipulation of an ejector rod required, the revolvers offer automatic and simultaneous ejection of empty cartridge cases when snapped open and the cylinder is presented in a favorable manner for rapid recharging. A speed loader could be had for the Webley early on in the 20th century and so equipped, the user had a formidable side arm indeed. The special Prideaux loader is a costly collector's item today but reproductions can be found.
Webley Mark VI & Prideaux Device - YouTube

The Pritchard bayonet was even devised for the 6-inch models as a tool for trench warfare in World War I. I'm a bit skeptical but the bayonet was a real piece of gear that saw some limited use.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzgppGj0sww

Maintenance is a breeze on the Webley as the bore is easily accessed due to the manner in which it opens. Nothing special is required. Just keep them clean and lubricated with light machine oil and they'll take care of you. Same as any other fine firearm.

The .455 cartridge is much like a .45 ACP only loaded with a materially heavier bullet and giving a lower velocity. It is no trick to obtain 750 fps from handloaded 255 grain .45 Colt lead bullets if they are the older .454 diameter size. No long-distance champ, the .455 is an excellent stopper for close in protection where bullet diameter and heavy lead can do their work. The original loading varied, depending on the era and whether black powder or smokeless propellant was used but the bullet generally weighed 262-265 grains and gave 675 fps or so. Due to bullet diameter and weight this equates to a goodly amount of "swat" against man or beast and these bullets also gave good penetration. At one time the British service issued a 218 grain "manstopper" or "Dum Dum" (named after the British arsenal of the same name located near Calcutta in India) loading for the Webley. Made of soft pure lead, it said to be highly effective. This bullet very much resembled a hollow-based wadcutter loaded in the case backward. I have an example of one, picked up in England, and this large bullet has a gaping maw for a hollow point that has to be seen to be appreciated.

The .38/200 in either the 178 grain jacketed bullet loading or the 200 grain lead bullet loading gave 650-700 fps from the typical 5-inch barrel of the Webley revolver. It's easy to handload a rough duplicate of this performance with 180 grain semi-wadcutters or 200 grain round nosed bullets and the revolver will shoot to point of aim at 15 yards when used with these handloads. The American factory 146 grain .38 S&W loads will shoot low by 8-12 inches in Webley revolvers because the sights aren't regulated for the lighter bullet.

If my .455 Webley wasn't so old I'd be very tempted to take it seriously as a personal defensive weapon for home or concealed carry use. While very sturdy, in the typically British sort of way, spare parts are not easily found, so there is no point in subjecting the revolver to so much wear and tear. I still give it occasional exercise at the range and do carry it afield on occasions. It will fit with perfect satisfaction in a holster designed for a 4-inch Smith & Wesson N-Frame gun.

On one occasion when I was wearing the .455 Webley while mowing around the cabin on our old family place a field rat ran out of the tall grass as I was nearing the end of the mowing chore. I was able to draw the revolver and snap shoot the rat on the run from about 7 yards away, the bullet plowing a deep furrow along the left side of his head, removing his left ear and left eye. Was a lucky shot but the old revolver was impressive when rapidly brought into action.



Webleys? I highly recommend them. There's little if anything that is truly detrimental about them other than they are obsolete and haven't been produced in many years now. The design has much to recommend it and ought to be brought back and modernized for current production methods as a worthy competitor to the double-action revolver with swing-out cylinder.
 

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Anyone here own or know a lot about the British Webley Mark VI revolver?

I'm really intrigued by them and I'm thinking of trying to get one.

How do they shoot? Big recoil? How's maintenance on them?
I've had a .45ACP conversion Webley MkVI for several years.

They have no recoil. The gun is built like a tank and weighs almost as much. If you get one in the original .455 it's like shooting a .22. Even the .45ACP conversions barely kick in the hand.

Maintenance is easy, just like any other revolver.

How do they shoot? Double action requires Incredible Hulk strength unless you have the internals worked, at least on any that I've shot. Much nicer to cock to single action and then the trigger is sweet as a nut.

I almost sold it at the last gun show I went to, but couldn't bring myself to do it. It goes so well with my Enfields.

Here she is:


 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Beautiful photos folks!

I'm green with envy...

Must get one of these in my future!
 

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A friend of mine in the AF in Alaska had one. When he showed it to me, it made me want to jump on my 3-wheeler and go charge something with it. Very cool old firearm!
 

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I know of one guy who absolutely LOVES them. Back in the late 80s I had a gun business and this fella would buy one from me just about every payday. He must have owned over a hundred just purchased from me alone.

I never could understand the fascination, but "to everyone their each as my grandmother used to say.

Called himself the "Webley King".
 
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