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So, I was thinking the other night, what if...

...I need to grab my gun in the middle of the night with no time to find my glasses if they aren't in their normal spot or pop in my contacts? I'm pretty sure I'd just be pointing by instinct--which I don't like! Any of y'all with glasses/contacts prepare for such a situation by taking your contacts out at the range or taking off your glasses? I'm not sure if people would think I'm crazy or not if I did that at the range...but I don't really care--I want to see what I can do without any contacts or glasses.

Or perhaps, I need to get an extra pair of glasses to put in the safe...
 

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I'm 60 and wear bifocals. If I could afford it both my carry guns would have lasers. Much of the time when at home I don't bother wearing my glasses as my vision is pretty sharp within 20 feet.
 
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FWIW-- Until some surgery 2 months ago I was extremely nearsighted-20/400 & 20/800. The Rx was -7.5 or so, depending.

I would have had no difficulty identifying an intruder and shooting at up to about 20 feet.

I'd certainly have been able to see my rear sights, probably my front sights (assuming I wasn't just pointing) and the target would have appeared out of focus but still adequately visible to hit it.

It really never crossed my mind that I couldn't shoot well enough within the walls of my own home to defend it. I did have Rx safety glasses that I used during H2H at the gym, and sometimes kept near the bed,
but they weren't really a solution to that rapid middle of the night panic need for the gun.

After surgery I see well enough to drive without glasses if I wish to do so, and exceptionally well with glasses- better than 20/20. But, I haven't had a chance to see how things go at the range. I might have trouble seeing the rear sight.

I'm now able to use over the counter safety glasses with a plain lens on the top and correction for close vision on the bottom;
available at Lowe's or similar. I leave these on the nightstand if only because they would (if I had the time to put them on) protect my eyes, maybe give a tad of protection from pepper too.

So, IMO, if you are able to see the big E, or better yet a line or two under without your glasses, you'll probably do OK if you have to.

Your experience of course might well be different from mine. Hope you find a solution that works for you.
 

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I wear Pure Vision 2 thirty day contact lenses, which I leave in day and night. My uncorrected vision is such that marksmanship aspiration is a fantasy.
 

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I generally never attempt to even try and hit the toilet without optical aid. If I'm caught and judged without my visual attire then not even the Gods will save me.
 
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I don't wear glasses, however, I think practicing point shooting would be an asset here. You can see center mass no matter what right?
If I could harness my Springer's olfactory senses then no demonic soul would be safe from my hunting instinct.
 

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Yes, sometimes. IMO, it's important to know what I'm capable of and where the vision limits are, if SHTF. Beyond about ~7-8yds, for me, things start to spread much more without my corrective stuff on. Nice to know that.

Of course, there's the risk of things flying back at me, so I don't do it that often, because of that risk.
 

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I wear bifocals, and when I'm practicing strictly for self defense I'm looking over the tops of my lenses. By doing that my mid-range vision can focus on the front sight and center of mass is clear enough at around 20-25 feet.

As far as greater distances go, without glasses I can hit a silhouette out to 60 feet but the rounds are hitting all over the target, but if a BG is that far off I'm either going for cover and escape, or holding ground while the dependants run for safety.
 

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Yes. I wear glasses usually just for reading and certain things - I probably should wear them more but I just don't yet. But I never where glasses when I shoot, just because I want to be able to shoot well without them. There is a BIG difference looking at my sights w/wo my glasses. I do dry fire practice with them on a lot, so I can really see if I'm keeping the front sight perfectly still. But I will say my vision is not THAT bad, I'm not anywhere near HAVING to wear glasses.
 

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I think it might be more important to practice waking up in the middle of the night and quickly throwing your glasses on to see how fast you can be ready - if your eyesight is bad enough. In my opinion, target identification is extremely important.

I'd say that if you can identify a target well enough from across your house, then you'll probably be alright to shoot without them. But if all you can see is a blurry, humanoid-looking figure then I'd say practice throwing your glasses on quickly.

And I like the idea of an extra pair of glasses in the safe if you can't guarantee that you'll put your regular pair in the same place every night.
 

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I am extremely nearsighted, while I might be able to hit a close target (I point shoot) I would have great difficulty in low light conditions discerning friend from foe.
 

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Train like you fight....but train for the worst case as well..... i think being proficient without vision correction devices...if doable is a good idea.
 

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I wear Pure Vision 2 thirty day contact lenses, which I leave in day and night. My uncorrected vision is such that marksmanship aspiration is a fantasy.
This sounds kind of familiar. I need my glasses to find the floor at night.

There's an "E" on that chart?
 
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I think it might be more important to practice waking up in the middle of the night and quickly throwing your glasses on to see how fast you can be ready - if your eyesight is bad enough. In my opinion, target identification is extremely important.

I'd say that if you can identify a target well enough from across your house, then you'll probably be alright to shoot without them. But if all you can see is a blurry, humanoid-looking figure then I'd say practice throwing your glasses on quickly.

And I like the idea of an extra pair of glasses in the safe if you can't guarantee that you'll put your regular pair in the same place every night.
Exactly. Target discrimination is a must.

It's easy to see how well you'll shoot without sight. There are many range-exercises that you can shoot without using your sights...even if you're not versed in the specific techniques of true point-shooting. You don't even have to close your eyes or otherwise compromise your sense of sight (for safety's sake): taping up your front and rear sights is a good exercise to both give the shooter a feel for instinctive shooting as well as is a diagnostic tool that many trainers use to help shooters pinpoint their deficiencies.

As for aiming assists such as visible lasers or, if you would like to consider them as such, mini-RDSs, I have an e-friend who is legally blind who gave me some insight (no pun intended :redface:) into some of his past experiences. For those with visual impairments, while the mini-RDS would seem like a logical idea, it will be necessary for the individual to test for him/herself the viability of the sight and its varying settings, given their unique personal visual needs and how their defensive surroundings/situations may overlap with such needs. For my friend, for example, he found the current generation of mini-RDSs to provide insufficient "dot" intensity for him to be able to use, and therefore currently use lasersights with his defensive pistols.

But to go back to the discussion of practice/training, yes, I think it's necessary that those of us with visual impairments practice/train without corrected vision. However, at the same time, this should also remember not to endanger our (or what's left of our :ahhhhh: ROFL!) eyesight (i.e. instead of shooting without glasses, you should put on a set of non-prescription glasses) while we train. Catching irreparable eye-damage from debris when we're in the fight of our lives is one thing - and that's completely different from an unfortunate training accident doing the same. :wink:
 
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