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I'm looking for an EDC knife and have been leaning toward Cold Steel. Are they as good quality as they are advertised? what qualities do I need to look for in a knife? I'm looking at a medium sized folder that I can slip in my pocket. Any info would be appreciated.
 

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I have numerous Cold Steel knives: Lawman, Voyager, Tanto and others and believe them to be a great value in a medium priced knife.:yup:
- They're a decent value for a EDC knife. I had a few models over the years and they held up fairly well. I haven't bought one in years though (other than a Mini-Pal) since buying knives from companies like Spyderco, Benchmade and Emerson. I think the build quality, steel and ergonomics are much better... for just a little more.
 

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Over the years I have accumulated quite a number of Cold Steel knifes. Some have been very, very good while others have tended toward being a POS. My problem has been that, sometimes, I cannot tell which is which before I make a purchase. In a very general sense I have found that the more expensive the knife has been the better it turned out to be.
 

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I have several and think they are excellent. I often carry a fixed blade CS I bought in 1988 and it's still a favorite.

I buy my boss at the gunshop something strange from them every Christmas. A battle axe or war hammer or spear or sword or something. It's a tradition.
 

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I believe that their better stuff is made in the states and has a good reputation. Their cheaper stuff I THINK is made overseas and it is crap. I bought my dad a a machete from them and it was a total turd (it was cheap). In life, especially with knives, you get what you pay for.

Spend the money up front and buy once.
 

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I have complete faith in Cold Steel products of all types. I have exclusively carried Cold Steel since the 80's. It even supplanted my K BAR in the Corps.

Now I carry the Recon Tanto. It is a medium size folder (4" blade) and is quick enough to open with a quick snap of my wrist. I can usually open it faster than most who carry switchblades. My favorite folder was the Vaquero Grande. Unfortunately, the blade is over the 5.5" limit in TX.
 

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I'm looking at either a Cold Steel Recon 1 or an Emerson CQC 7A. I dont mind spending a few extra bucks to get a knife thats gonna last over the long haul.
 

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I love my Cold Steel knives, especially the Ti-Lites - both the 4" and 6" are well worth having. Their knives tend to be way overbuilt and incredibly solid.

Like any other weapon, a knife will always have pros and cons. Once you start collecting, there's no end - I must have at least 50, counting the throwers.
 

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I have a San Mai Master Tanto and it's a great knife. It is as sharp as advertised and easy to sharpen. I never tried to bend it or do the stupid stuff on Lynn's demonstrations.
 

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Are the knives as good as Lynn Thompson says they are? No, because doing anything that he does in his advertising videos with your Cold Steel knife will void the warranty.

Are they good knives? It depends. Cold Steel is a distributor and marketer, not a manufacturer, so it really depends on who's making their knives at any given point. They had a few years where they were really good, because Ontario Knife Company was making their knives.

It's difficult to tell anything about even things like their knife steel, because they use proprietary names for the steel in their knives and the actual makeup of that steel varies depending on who is making it at a given time.

I do not consider them as good of a value as Spyderco, Benchmade, or Kershaw, given that you can get a knife that is just as well made or better out of better materials for a similar price or slightly more.

But many of their knives are not BAD quality per se, just not as good as many similarly priced knives.

One thing that Cold Steel is good at is coming up with wacky, off-the-wall self-defense items and oddball ethnic-inspired knives. They've done well with those.
 

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Like many other companies Cold Steel made a reputation using quality steel made in the USA ......... now most of their knives are made in china and they're skating on their reputation to sell product. Just My .02
 

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I'm looking at either a Cold Steel Recon 1 or an Emerson CQC 7A. I dont mind spending a few extra bucks to get a knife thats gonna last over the long haul.
- The Emerson is the better knife. It's also made in the U.S.

I would buy the version with the Wave.
 

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- The Emerson is the better knife. It's also made in the U.S.
+1 on the Emerson. There's no telling who actually made a Cold Steel knife, so the quality varies considerably. In addition, the CQC-7A's 154CM is a better steel than Cold Steel's AUS-8, but not as good as, say, S30v. In the knife world especially, you tend to get what you pay for.
 

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+1 on the Emerson. There's no telling who actually made a Cold Steel knife, so the quality varies considerably. In addition, the CQC-7A's 154CM is a better steel than Cold Steel's AUS-8, but not as good as, say, S30v. In the knife world especially, you tend to get what you pay for.
154CM is for all practical purposes as good as S30V. The difference between AUS-8 and 154CM is miles, the difference between 154CM and S30V is inches, and it's lateral inches. I prefer 154CM or D2 for having a less toothy edge and being a bit easier to sharpen.
 

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They are decent knives, but the advertising is obnoxious. If you are considering an Emerson there is really no comparison between the two. The Emerson is far superior.
 

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I'm looking for an EDC knife and have been leaning toward Cold Steel. Are they as good quality as they are advertised? what qualities do I need to look for in a knife? I'm looking at a medium sized folder that I can slip in my pocket. Any info would be appreciated.
I have a couple - nice knives but overpriced.

If you want a good sturdy well made "made in USA" everyday use knife try here Ontario Knife's Catalog

Many of Ontarios production knives were designed by well known custom makers :wink:
 

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I like Cold Steel for the money, but prefer knives from Blind Horse.
 

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I have a San Mai Master Tanto and it's a great knife. It is as sharp as advertised and easy to sharpen. I never tried to bend it or do the stupid stuff on Lynn's demonstrations.
Some of the demonstrations that CS performs are part of the American Blade Smith associations blade testing. For a student to be granted the Master Blade smith title, their blade must pass a manila rope cut test, a wood chopping test, a hair shaving test and a bend test. A blade made by a qualified Master Smith will be superior to almost any manufactured blade. As far as I know, there is no mfg. blade that can pass the blade bend test - which bends the blade to a full 90 degrees without breaking or cracking. The ABS tests verify the blade's edge geometry, the edge retention and toughness. Search youtube for american bladesmith society bend test.

Here is the summary of the tests:

1. ROPE CUTTING: THE PURPOSE OF THIS TEST IS TO TEST THE EDGE GEOMETRY AND SHARPNESS.
The applicant is responsible for supplying the test rope and ensuring that it is a minimum of one (1) inch in diameter. If the applicant brings a larger rope, the applicant will be judged using the same criteria as though the rope was one (1) inch in diameter. The rope is to be hung in a safe manner, so that the end of the rope to be cut hangs loose without touching the floor or any other object. As a safety precaution, the rope is not to be hand held by another person during the rope-cutting test. The hanging end of the rope is to be marked with tape or a marker to clearly indicate the area that is to be cut. The cut must be approximately six (6) inches from the end of the free hanging rope. A minimum of one (1) cut must be made. The applicant is to aim at the mark with a two (2) inch margin of high or low being acceptable. The applicant must sever the rope in two with one stroke. If the applicant fails on the first attempt, the Master Smith will allow two more attempts. However, if the Master Smith believes that the failure to sever the rope is due to the lack of skill or strength of the applicant, the Master Smith may attempt the rope cutting with the test knife. This is a test of the applicant’s ability to make a knife, not his or her ability to cut with it. If neither the applicant nor the Master Smith successfully cuts the rope, the applicant fails.

2. WOOD CHOPPING: THE PURPOSE OF THIS TEST IS TO DEMONSTRATE EDGE TOUGHNESS.
The chopping test is to be conducted with a 2x4 construction grade wood stud. The 2x4 may be either hand held or clamped into a vise or other safety device. A chopping motion (no whittling) is to be used. The 2x4 must be chopped completely through a minimum of two (2) times. The applicant may choose the area of the 2x4 through which to chop. Following the chopping test, the Master Smith will inspect the edge to determine if there is any noticeable damage to the blade. Any nicks, chips, flat spots, rolled edges, or other deformations of the blade, including bending, will result in failure of the test.

3. SHAVING HAIR: THE PURPOSE OF THIS TEST IS TO DEMONSTRATE EDGE RETENTION.
After the Master Smith approves the quality of the edge, the blade will be returned to the applicant. The applicant must then shave hair from his or her arm, using the section of the blade that was most frequently used in the cutting and chopping portions of the test. Enough hair must be shaved to demonstrate that the edge remains keen and shaving sharp.

4. BENDING: THE PURPOSE OF THIS TEST IS TO SHOW THAT THE APPLICANT IS ABLE TO HEAT TREAT A KNIFE WITH A SOFT BACK AND A HARD EDGE.
The bending of the blade is the final test. Safety gear should be worn. The edge and point will be dulled prior to bending. The Master Smith will mark a line across the width of the blade approximately three (3) inches from the tip of the blade. The blade will then be inserted into a vise, tip first, such that the blade is placed into the vise up to the mark on the blade. If the vise jaws are very rough, smooth metal or hardwood inserts may be placed on each side of the clamped portion of the blade to protect it when bending the test knife. The blade shall be bent by force applied to the handle. A leverage device, such as a pipe may be used as long as it does not pose a safety risk. The use of such a device is at the sole risk of the applicant and at the discretion of the supervising Master Smith. The applicant will then bend the blade ninety (90) degrees.

Also in terms of other knife mfg. So far the best quality for the money is ESEE - I own the ESEE 5 - which is 1/4 inch thick, grinds were perfect - hair splitting sharp. I also own the RAT 5 in D2 steel by Ontario - this knife actually came with an uneven grind and its thinner than the ESEE 5 - only by 1/16 thick. Its half the price of the ESEE 5 though. I also own the Seal team elite, its not a bad knife either for the money and lastly I own the CS Laredo bowie - a nice quality knife but expensive
 
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