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So I am at a bit of a crossroads. I am currently carrying a Taurus 709 and I love it. Seriously, I LOVE the 709. It has all the features I want. It's thin. It's light. The gun is a perfect match for. There are however 2 small issues.

Issue number one. My wife loves it as well. And she doesnt currently have a EDC of her own. She shoots the gun incredibly well and it would make a fine fit for her. I have no issue either giving it to her (Because it gives me an excuse to buy something new! :) or buying her one as her own. I will admit however that it seems like a bit of a waste to me to own 2 of the exact same fire arm.

Issue number two. As much as I have tried to not pay attention to it...I have found myself falling victim to the caliber wars. Even though I know that with modern ammunition the 9mm is a effective round I have found myself craving a big honking .45 for that legendary "Stopping power". What I REALLY would like to have is a 1911 stle compact 45 but there are a few issues with that.

The first and foremost being weight. I have back issues and I need a light gun. This is one of the reason I love the 709. I can carry it all day pain free. Unfortuanetly for me every ounce counts. 2-3 ounces can be the difference between a pain free day and a very painful day.

The other issue is price. I know that there are a few companies out there that make a fairly lightweight 1911 compact but they are out of my price range. I just can't afford to drop 800-1000 bucks on a gun.

Any suggestions for my dilema?
 

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May I 'second' the Glock-36. It's my EDC and I absolutely love the gun.:comeandgetsome:
Just pick one up...you'll see.:yup:
 

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I don't see anything wrong with having "twins". If it's great for your wife, and great for you also, and you both carry, go for it. Don't try to fix what ain't broke. It's not really any different than owning a different gun in the same caliber.
 

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I don't see anything wrong with having "twins". If it's great for your wife, and great for you also, and you both carry, go for it. Don't try to fix what ain't broke. It's not really any different than owning a different gun in the same caliber.
+1 This gives you redundancy (two is one).

Plus you and your wife would both have comfort with each other's carry piece.

Don't give in to the caliber wars. It's all hype! Especially given your back issues, the upgrade to a heavier gun sounds ill-advised.

Other than missing the opportunity to "branch out", there is no real downside.
 

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The root of your problem is being influenced by a society that is founded on consumer excess.

You found a gun that is (relatively) inexpensive and that both you and your wife love. Learn to be content with those situations and not fall prey to consumerism.

Now, I just need to find a GP100. I really love my SW1911PD, my GLOCK 19, my SW 442, but I just "need" a GP100. And an AR-15. And a shotgun. And a...
 

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I have two recommendations in order of preference.

1.) Get another 709. This way you and your wife are familiar with each others weapon should something happen that requires her to take yours or your hers. Your spare mags will be identical in case of emergency reloads. And most of all, you already love it.

2.) GLOCK 36 - small, light-weight and .45ACP. It is not a compact 1911, but with your restrictions, I am not sure you will find what you are looking for anyway. Even the lightest Officer's sized models are going to be significantly heavier.

Good luck with your decision.
 

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Just buy another 709. If it's already a perfect fit, then...

C'mon, I laughed when I read the OP. You are so looking for a reason to buy another gun! :)

Not that I blame you, I wish my wife would get into guns (as opposed to her knife obsession), then maybe I could have these "dilemmas".
 

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I have posted this the study below in other threads, and will do so again.

One of the best and most cited studies done on the subject of "stopping power" was done by Evan Marshall of the Detroit Police Department back in the 1990's. His study was compiled from data across the country using "real-world" shooting incidents. His study only collected data met this criteria:
  • Single bullet (no multiple shots)
  • Torso hits only (no head or appendage shots)
  • A "stop" meant that the perp dropped within 10-feet of the shot (out of commission)

The data shows that even lowly mousegun cartridge like the .380 ACP has a decent percentage for "stopping power". The percentage might not be in the near 90% range of the mighty .40 S&W, but it is still much higher than most people on this forum would be willing to give it credit. Isn't it interesting that the lowly .380 ACP Hydra-Shok JHP or Cor-Bon JHP have a higher one shot stop percentage than the "legendary" .45 ACP FMJ cartridges. Have we not all seen on these very forums that people would rather carry a FMJ .45 than any small caliber cartridge. The idea being that a .45 ACP bullet does not really need to expand to be more effective than other calibers.

Article based on study: Selecting the Duty Weapon--Is Caliber the Key?

If we decipher the statistics provided by this study, we will see the following 1-shot stop percentages:
  • .380 ACP = 62.29%
  • .38 Special 2" barrel = 61.90%
  • .38 Special 4" barrel = 70.60%
  • .357 Magnum = 86.55%
  • 9mm = 82.44%
  • .40 S&W = 87.37%
  • .45 ACP = 82.50%

If you look look at these "real life" 1-shot stop percentages, you will see that statistically there is no discernible difference between the pedestrian 9mm and the "legendary" .45 ACP.

What should this mean to you? Choose the firearm and caliber that fits you the best, and stop over thinking a given cartridge's superiority, which is usually based only on anecdotal reports anyway.

P.S. The reason that many police departments choose calibers larger than the 9mm usually involve an assumption that officers may need to shoot through barriers like auto glass. If you foresee a need to penetrate car doors in a shootout, you may want to look at a .40 S&W based handgun. :)
 

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First, there's nothing wrong with having two of the same guns. Both of you should carry what you shoot best. I've said it before and here it is again:

The "best" gun is the one YOU like, not anyone else. It will be a compromise of:

1. Fit - It should fit in your hand like you were born with it there.
2. Reliability - It should go BANG about 99.8% of the time you pull the trigger.
3. Accuracy - In YOUR hand. It's how well YOU shoot it.
4. Concealability - It should be comfortable enough to wear and easy enough to conceal so you won't leave it laying on the dresser at home.
5. Cost - You don't want to scrimp on your "life protector" weapon, but you probably don't need a $1,000 Kimber, either.

Don't give in to the caliber wars. It's all hype!
True. NO handgun, I repeat, NO handgun is a reliable stopper, much less a "one shot" stopper. Shot placement and number of hits are the deciding factors. Any caliber on your belt is better than a "big, honking .45" sitting on the dresser because it's too big-too heavy-uncomfortable to carry/shoot, etc. A "stopper" shot happens for two reasons: 1. The BG is too injured to continue. 2. The BG is afraid of being shot again.
 

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No matter whether it is a gun, holster or belt...aw heck...or any other item, it is all about personal preference. Get what works best for you. I carry a 1911 but that does not mean it is right for everyone or anyone. It is not always about round count, velocity or caliber.
I own a BFR 10" chambered for S&W 500. It has more stopping power but I don't carry it....lol :rolleyes: OR should I? Excuse me bad guy...will you please back up a step so I can draw my gun :rofl:

Carl
 

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Having you and your wife using the same gun, and same spare mags, would be a great thing!! I only wish my wife would carry a G26...

How many times do I see police officers (either partners, or in the same department) carrying different guns? One with a Glock, another with a Sig?!:spankme: Mag compatibility, anyone?

As far as the caliber wars...I am also a 9mm guy, but always conceded that there must be some benefit to a larger caliber. I just never could determine if the benefit was worth the trade-off in mag capacity, recoil/follow-up shot speed, and ammo costs. I found some interesting data that convinced me that 9mm is the best overall compromise for me...wrote about it here...

http://www.defensivecarry.com/vbull...on-ballistics/88508-caliber-wars-over-me.html

Hope that helps settle "the grass is greener over there" for you as well!:wink:
 

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Any suggestions for my dilema?
Kahr CW45 or P45 or T45. All are lightweight to satisfy your back, all are very thin and concealable and they come to you for a moderate price, as low as about $425.
 

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G36!
 

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Choose the firearm and caliber that fits you the best, and stop over thinking a given cartridge's superiority, which is usually based only on anecdotal reports anyway.
Well said. You are better off with a smaller caliber which you can shoot comfortably and accurately than with a larger caliber which you have to "spray and pray".
 

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Well IIRC you downsized for weight purposes. Due to a back condition. The 36 makes sense but might be too much weight. I would maybe search GB for a Kahr PM45. Maybe stay toward a 40 or .357 sig. Like a PM40 or a P2000SK. Just a few ideas.
 

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Not much to add to this thread.......

Don't be afraid to buy something different & also don't be afraid to buy another of the same firearm.

We currently have THREE Glock 23s. My wife liked mine so much she had to have one....then they came out with the 'rail' & we got a third one.

I also own a BUNCH of 1911s.....while they are all slightly different, they are still 1911s.

Having more than one of the same firearms can make it a little cheaper than having a bunch of different ones.....Magazines & bullets fit BOTH. Holsters will fit BOTH! Ergonomics & controls are identical!
 

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Adding to what gglass said, the .45acp is usually used by those who use the idea that while a 9mm and .40sw might expand to .70 - .80, a .45 never goes below .45 which is always bigger than a .40sw and 9mm that do not expand properly. However, with the newer bullet designs I don't think 9mm is really bad at all. Here's why I say that.

You get more ammo with 9mm and trust me you won't shoot like you do at the range when it comes time for defensive shooting. You get an easier time with recoil. For some, this is a very important factor. Others like myself can handle .45acp and .40sw which have significantly more recoil than 9mm and that's just fine. Not everyone can shoot accurately with heavy recoil rounds. New designs in 9mm do not plug when passing through heavy clothing and the penetration is almost always right on where you want it to be to reach vital areas during a shoot.

I carry a .40sw myself, I wanted to carry a .45acp but I split the difference. I used to carry 9mm. The thing for me is I shoot a 1911 really well and love them. I would carry them if they weren't so heavy, and for the fact they aren't cheap if you get yourself a nice one. In the event you need to use your weapon the LEOs will take it and do their investigation. I'm not comfortable handing over a $1000+ gun to them.
 

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New designs in 9mm do not plug when passing through heavy clothing and the penetration is almost always right on where you want it to be to reach vital areas during a shoot.
That's what Corbon claims for their DPX - a petal effect rather than a mushroom. Penetrates better - 16" for the 115 gr. 9mm.
 
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