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A provocative article...

"The false ego generated by all the talk and supposition drives modern man to actually avoid professional training. If they take that big step and attend a course or go to a school they risk having all their pre-disposed notions shattered. They might discover to their great displeasure that they aren’t actually good shooters and that their favorite blaster is not actually akin to Thor’s Hammer. Having been raised in a society that embraces mediocrity and excuses failure, these men’s ego can’t risk the blow. Their solution is to simply buy more expensive gear."

The Super Ego, or Why Men are Afraid to Train | Global Counter Terror (GCT) Magazine
 

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My wife has a very wealthy cousin. He pays for two or three week long gun training sessions a year for him, his two sons, and his son-in-law. They have been to all of the big ones. He has invited me to go with them. The problem is if the SHTF and they are in my area, I would be tempted to shoot them first to get them out of my way.
 

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I could probably write an equally-compelling article about the shortcomings of "professional" gun-fighting schools and the training junkies who attend them for entertainment and false-ego building. Brevity being one of my shortcomings, gun rags probably wouldn't publish.
 

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Another macho fantasy tacticool argument intended to sell training. BTW, I have nothing against training and I have taken a lot of it, but this idea there is something fundamentally wrong with people who don't want to spend a lot of time and money on training is BS. If defensive carry is risk reduction, why aren't we training in other risk reduction activities? Who regularly takes training in firefighting or defensive driving?
 

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Did not read the article. But the one thing I'll say about training and practice is there is a big difference between shooting a gun and gun fighting
 

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An interesting article but his sole attribution of ego for the tendency to eschew training is a bit simplistic in my estimation. He makes no mention of the costs in time and money involved or our market economy, which conditions us to solve all our problems through purchasing the newer and better whiz bang gear.
 

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Beware of sweeping generalizations, many gunfights are won by untrained people.

If anything, the best training someone can get for fighting with a gun IMO is a FoF class where it's a 2-way 3-D range using simunitions or other pain inducing non-lethal system.

Anyone can learn to shoot. Most can learn to shoot quickly. Many can learn to draw and shoot fast and accurately. Almost all of these get humbled quickly in FoF training.
 

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Beware of sweeping generalizations, many gunfights are won by untrained people.

If anything, the best training someone can get for fighting with a gun IMO is a FoF class where it's a 2-way 3-D range using simunitions or other pain inducing non-lethal system.

Anyone can learn to shoot. Most can learn to shoot quickly. Many can learn to draw and shoot fast and accurately. Almost all of these get humbled quickly in FoF training.
To this I say Amen...

Of the training classes I have taken FOF was the most rewarding and eye opening. And the true test of any and all training, practice you have done before that day in FOF class.
 

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Most guys would go to quality training if they could afford it and their spouses would let them spend the money on that. Just an opinion
^^This^^

I would like to get more professional training than the basics that I've had, at some point. It's so freakin' expensive, though, that it takes some long term planning to pay for it.

Things like actually practicing shooting regularly, along with "life" things like replacing the well pump that went bad and repairing the car engine that self-destructed, tend to -usually rightly- get priority.

For people of average means, like myself, as long as you can safely carry your gun, and can draw it and shoot it with any semblance of accuracy, professional training is a luxury, not a necessity of life. Ego certainly has nothing to do with it...
 

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Yea, gun fighting, like getting shot at with AK 47's. :yup:
Only on those times I'd like something other than a handgun. But one has to do what one has to do, with what they have, when they have it.
 

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I could probably write an equally-compelling article about the shortcomings of "professional" gun-fighting schools and the training junkies who attend them for entertainment and false-ego building. Brevity being one of my shortcomings, gun rags probably wouldn't publish.
I would read and enjoy that article, and laugh and laugh.

I have been to some good gun schools and I have been to a couple with toxic levels of testosterone. If you need a gun to feel like a badass, then you probably aren't a badass.
 

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Writers write...
After reading the blurb, I elected to avoid reading the article.

That aside, I suspect that the writer's false ego generated by binge reading Harlequin Romance novels drove him/her to avoid psychological counseling.
 
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