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Yeah, that pistol just didn’t work out. Believe me when I say that I’m sticking to revolvers, Glocks, and the 1911 from here on out.
The BHP, well, it just didn’t live up to my expectations. The thumb safety was really stiff, and the trigger wasn’t all that great.
I guess I could have thrown money at it and corrected those things, but to tell the truth, I do like the CZ-75 better if I was to go that route.

Im just at the point now, that I want to just spend my money on ammo for practice, and do the Gunsite thing rather than buy another gun.

You can’t beat a Glock, revolver, or 1911 for what I need a gun for.
Glad to hear you find your likes. It has taken me a lot of trying but, the snubby has been there the entire journey from day one as has the full size revolver. Everything else has been a side dish to the main meal.
I also tried a BHP and for the life of me could not see the attraction except the visual. Nice looking piece but, weird small safety and not a great grip fit for me and the only gun to ever give me hammer bite.
357 and 38 special rule the house here with a Glock 45 and a Walther 9 for kicks or zombies or something to trade later.:wink:
 

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Glad to hear you find your likes. It has taken me a lot of trying but, the snubby has been there the entire journey from day one as has the full size revolver. Everything else has been a side dish to the main meal.
I also tried a BHP and for the life of me could not see the attraction except the visual. Nice looking piece but, weird small safety and not a great grip fit for me and the only gun to ever give me hammer bite.
357 and 38 special rule the house here with a Glock 45 and a Walther 9 for kicks or zombies or something to trade later.:wink:
I think other than pocket carrying a BG 380 for a while, and briefly owning a BHP, I have pretty much been very consistent with Glocks, 1911, and revolvers.
 

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Is there a professional standards organization for Training and Trainers adhere to or is it just a bunch of instructors do their thing, be it right, wrong or indifferent.
 

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Is there a professional standards organization for Training and Trainers adhere to or is it just a bunch of instructors do their thing, be it right, wrong or indifferent.
There are some associations but IMHO, they are just groups doing their own things, right, wrong or indifferent. Then there is the NRA that has has standards for training, but IMHO, their courses are not all that good. It's a free-for-all. There are some good schools and instructors that are respected, if you can physically and financially get to them to train. There is no "gold standard."
 

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Is there a professional standards organization for Training and Trainers adhere to or is it just a bunch of instructors do their thing, be it right, wrong or indifferent.
I would say places like Gunsite, Thunder Ranch, and LFI, and Valor Ridge are some of the most reputable with a proven track record of offering what would be widely considered main stream, and fundamentally sound.
 

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There are some associations but IMHO, they are just groups doing their own things, right, wrong or indifferent. Then there is the NRA that has has standards for training, but IMHO, their courses are not all that good. It's a free-for-all. There are some good schools and instructors that are respected, if you can physically and financially get to them to train. There is no "gold standard."
That's the problem its a cottage industry with no standards other than the instructor running the show. As for the NRA they are way behind the developmental curve in regards of training.
 

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I would say places like Gunsite, Thunder Ranch, and LFI, and Valor Ridge are some of the most reputable with a proven track record of offering what would be widely considered main stream, and fundamentally sound.
Yes there was Cooper whom founded Gunsite and Clint Smith whom was an instructor their until he founded Thunder Ranch as for LFI and Valor Ridge I'll take your word on that.
 

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Well, the only self defence shooting class I ever payed for . . . the targets we're too far away so . . .

I think social distancing is the best thing since rocks and sticks for self defence.

I have high standards.
 
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Did not read the article. But the one thing I'll say about training and practice is there is a big difference between shooting a gun and gun fighting
And fighting for a gun within range.
 
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I suspect your situation is the norm for most of us in our age bracket. With your background I'd say you have a good ability to self assess, noting your weaknesses and how to correct them, not to mention actually getting out and doing it.

There is no substitute for regular practice. In my traditional martial arts training I took a hiatus for about a year due to serious illness. When I came back I had to mentally reclassify myself as a lower belt as those were the only techniques I could rely on. My mind was willing but the body was weak. The neural pathways weren't up to my previous levels; and this was as an advanced Black belt! However, based on my previous level of training I was able to guide myself. My point is that we need some training but beyond a certain point I think, for most of us, it is probably more important to practice (i.e., maintain) what we've assimilated.
Well, at your age you should be poking Bic pens into people's skulls through their eyes and ears so sit down and shut up!

 
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And fighting for a gun within range.
And that pretty much falls into the the subject of gunfighting. Because gunfighting is far more than just knowing how to shoot and hit a bulls eyes.

I knew how to handle a gun and how to hit the bulls eye before I started to CC. But my gut told me I didn't know, what I thought, I needed to handle a CC situation. I was lucky and found that training and it is a comfortable feeling for me to know I can do more than just shoot a gun and hit a small target.

Am I still as comfortable as I was a few years ago? No! Age has it's down falls, but I am still better off with what I found than if I had not found it.
 

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You can find interviews and YouTube clips from most reputable trainers. Lots of the guys who really push to develop their programs and teaching chops can be sampled on those mediums. These guys travel all over and teach at facilities as guests.

Research them, choose someone you like who you think your personality will jive with and take an 8hr or two day class when they come close to you.
 

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Such a interesting premise and I must say I have found it for the most part true in all of my training classes. There are a lot of people who have taken training classes and they can excel in learning how to " run their gun". Play by " big boy rules" and are effective at drawing, shooting, clearing malfunctions and handling most gun related issues. I then took a training class by a retired French Special Forces instructor who kick all of our asses so bad most of the class dropped out after one session even though the class was for four sessions. He was able to demonstrate and create so much stress for us to perform under that we all failed the first two session. However if you were willing he would teach you and push you to understand and to get better. But you had to be willing to fail in order to get better and that is what I found most students could not handle. They wanted to be patted on the back and told they were good, where in fact they were good at running their gun but not good at hand to hand defensive training or working in low light situations in a complex maze of cover, no cover scenarios.
Never had I had a teacher teach me so much about how to sit at a table, how to sit at a chair, how to work in low light and no light conditions, how to give up your wallet if held up, how to go to your car in a parking garage, how to do gun disarms, clear rooms and most importantly how to think ( and breathe) when your under extreme stress. I learned never to give up, always to keep fighting and how to think when under extreme duress. Every day in my life something comes up where I think of this instructor and what he has taught me. He hasn't taught in a couple of years as he is still working on overseas gigs as they come up. But if you can find one who has been there and done that and who is willing to open up that door for you to truly learn than you have found a great instructor and don't let him go.
 

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If shooting instruction is anything like scuba instructing, the motivation for advanced training is solely to fill slots and get paid more.

Earlier in life, I had the time and motivation to train, but didn't have the money. Now I have the time and probably the money, but age and the reality of aging sapped the motivation. I'm good for a couple hours and then I'm done, ready to pack the guns away and head home for a tall one. Ego has nothing to do with how much I train.
Same here.
Shooting prone, supine, kneeling or rolling around in the dirt are no longer on this old man’s bucket list.
If forced to I can, but will not pay to do so anymore.
 

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Training some years ago was, if not pleasant, at least endurable. Now, it is no longer mental attention span, but physical attention span - I am not eager to place myself in a situation where I have to keep going at anything for 8 hours at a time, much less more than one day. Any rapid movement, such as moving between cover/concealment, etc, is conducive to injury - as often as I do that to myself at home I have no intention of doing it elsewhere. My training days are over. Range time is my training now.
 

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Men resist training for the same reason they resist asking for directions. Because we can!
 
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