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Discussion Starter #1
Since we seem to be living on a diet of bad and worse news, please allow me a moment to share a slightly different perspective.

I think, as some have said, that this will not be our worst moment, but our finest hour. I see a nation of citizens who seemingly had their noses so buried in their phones that you could have pushed most off a cliff with a feather. It seemed the vast majority had become the proverbial "head in the sand" kind of folk who could only care for themselves. Everyone else could just go hang. As long as we had "ours" nobody and nothing else was of importance.

Well...I see that changing. I pray you will open your eyes and look carefully. We'll likely not see the likes of this ever again in our lifetimes. Our forefathers saw it during WWII - everyone pitching in to just get the job done. We saw tiny glimpses of it on rare occasions, but I believe if you look carefully, you'll start to see that it is happening all around us. And to think we have been so overcome by bad news that we almost missed it!

Please join me, arm in arm, as we put off this spirit of "me first" and buckle up to get the job done for our family, our friends, our neighbors, and our great nation. I think I'll let General Patton say it for me.


FlagDay.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awakening the sleeping giant: "Calling all snowflakes, calling all snowflakes..., hmmm, is this mike on?"
I think many of the snowflakes are busy waiting in line for their NICS checks!
 

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Unfortunately, for me, this situation has also brought out the the worst in people. Hoarding of basic supplies. Endless snowflakes trolling social media trying to shame people left and right over the slightest of microaggression. The "Woke" crowd needs to back to sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One thing to remember. It didn't take everyone in England to create their "finest hour." It only takes enough to start bringing some rays of sunshine out of the gloom. Everyone has a choice.

"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."
Winston Churchill
 

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One thing to remember. It didn't take everyone in England to create their "finest hour." It only takes enough to start bringing some rays of sunshine out of the gloom. Everyone has a choice.

"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."
Winston Churchill
That would be the guys delivering Dunkin Donuts.
 
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I too am seeing some positives in this pandemic.

People are getting outdoors again, enjoying their parks and walking their dogs. I walk my dog every day and walk my mother's foster dogs a few times a week. I'm seeing people out and about that I never knew had dogs as well as people who haven't spent any considerable time outdoors for years.

One negative outcome is a lot of unruly dogs who haven't been leashed up for years. Some are plain out of control and I avoid these pups and their owners as best as I can.

Don't get me started on the people with retractable leashes...
 

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I see more people out walking also, but some counties near me are closing parks to address the group-size problems. So far, everyone I've met out walking has given space as we pass. I'm about done with the Stalinist commands from above and will not give up the exercise I waited so long to achieve with my bad knees. If you guys don't hear from me for a while, it's because I've been arrested for being outside while under "shelter in place" commands from Herr Hitler.
 

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I wish you were right.
I predict that a few months after this has past and things get back to “normal”
It will all be forgotten and most will go back to their old ways.
The liberals will go back on the Get Trump train and the long knives will come out again and the Balkanization of America will take up where it left off.
 

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What I think is how dramatic some people and the media are getting about this situation. Did you know it has only been three weeks, since the first states declared emergencies? It has only been two weeks since COVID-19 was declared a "pandemic." We are not really even a month into this and people are doing the Chicken Little thing.

I could not be blamed for panicking. I'm at very high risk for this virus. My retirement portfolio is down 20%. But hey, I'm getting some projects done and I finally got 20 rolls of TP delivered this afternoon! I will be cautious, but I will not panic, I will not be afraid. Like OldChap, I'm pretty optimistic.

I look out my door and nothing has changed. I walk my dogs and people are out walking theirs and they say "Hi." There is no look of panic or fear in their eyes. Three unrelated millenials who are home from college have gone on my neighborhood website and offered to help anyone cooped up in their homes with errands, pro bono. I have communicated with friends of mine all over the country and the worst thing I hear is that people are bored. But no panic, no fear.

We will get through this with flying colors. It's what Americans do. We will get the aftermath sorted out also.
 

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Things must be different in parts of the country where a lot of you live. I live in north St. Louis county and commute into the city every day. I think things around here are quite calm peaceful and orderly considering many businesses have closed or are operating in a diminished capacity. A lot of folks have lost their jobs, (7 yesterday at my work).

All this and I don't see people at each others throat, It seems to me like folks are cutting each other a bit more slack. I do get a "we're all in this together vibe" from what's going on. Maybe it just feels that way because nobody wants to get near anyone else. I'm just lovin my covid-19 commute to and from work. Light traffic, no road rage.

I'm also not going to bash the "snowflake" generation, because as I look around it seems to me many of the current crop of first responders on the street as well as nurse and medical personnel tasked with caring for compromised individuals should they get this thing are of the "snowflake" generation. If you end up in a hospital bed on a ventilator, it probably won't be a babyboomer wiping you bottom.
 

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Dang. First my spring is ruined by this damned virus... and now Christmas is ruined too...
 
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My wife got this from a friend - unattributed, author unknown. I suspect several here feel the same way:

I talked to a man today
I talked with a man today, an 80+-year-old man. I asked him if there was anything I can get him while this Coronavirus scare was gripping America.

He simply smiled, looked away and said:
"Let me tell you what I need! I need to believe, at some point, this country my generation fought for... I need to believe this nation we handed safely to our children and their children...
I need to know this generation will quit being a bunch of sissies...that they respect what they've been given...that they've earned what others sacrificed for."

I wasn't sure where the conversation was going or if it was going anywhere at all. So, I sat there, quietly observing.

"You know, I was a little boy during WWII. Those were scary days. We didn't know if we were going to be speaking English, German or Japanese at the end of the war. There was no certainty, no guarantees like Americans enjoy today.

And no home went without sacrifice or loss. Every house, up and down every street, had someone in harm's way. Maybe their Daddy was a soldier, maybe their son was a sailor, maybe it was an uncle. Sometimes it was the whole damn family...fathers, sons, uncles...
Having someone, you love, sent off to war...it wasn't less frightening than it is today. It was scary as Hell. If anything, it was more frightening. We didn't have battlefront news. We didn't have email or cellphones. You sent them away and you hoped...you prayed. You may not hear from them for months, if ever. Sometimes a mother was getting her son's letters the same day Dad was comforting her over their child's death.

And we sacrificed. You couldn't buy things. Everything was rationed. You were only allowed so much milk per month, only so much bread, toilet paper. EVERYTHING was restricted for the war effort. And what you weren't using, what you didn't need, things you threw away, they were saved and sorted for the war effort. My generation was the original recycling movement in America.

And we had viruses back then...serious viruses. Things like polio, measles, and such. It was nothing to walk to school and pass a house or two that was quarantined. We didn't shut down our schools. We didn't shut down our cities. We carried on, without masks, without hand sanitizer. And do you know what? We persevered. We overcame. We didn't attack our President, we came together. We rallied around the flag for the war. Thick or thin, we were in it to win. And we would lose more boys in an hour of combat than we lose in entire wars today."

He slowly looked away again. Maybe I saw a small tear in the corner of his eye. Then he continued:
"Today's kids don't know sacrifice. They think sacrifice is not having coverage on their phone while they freely drive across the country. Today's kids are selfish and spoiled. In my generation, we looked out for our elders. We helped out with single moms whose husbands were either at war or dead from war. Today's kids rush the store, buying everything they can...no concern for anyone but themselves. It's shameful the way Americans behave these days. None of them deserve the sacrifices their granddads made.

So, no I don't need anything. I appreciate your offer but, I know I've been through worse things than this virus. But maybe I should be asking you, what can I do to help you? Do you have enough pop to get through this, enough steak? Will you be able to survive with 113 channels on your tv?"

I smiled, fighting back a tear of my own...now humbled by a man in his 80's. All I could do was thank him for the history lesson, leave my number for emergency and leave with my ego firmly tucked in my rear.

I talked to a man today. A real man. An American man from an era long gone and forgotten. We will never understand the sacrifices. We will never fully earn their sacrifices. But we should work harder to learn about them..learn from them...to respect them.​
 
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