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Discussion Starter #1
I am beginning to look for a new backpack. I stil have my older one, so I am not in a huge rush. I can wait until I find the right thing.

I am basically looking for something that fits the following guidelines.

Durable
Light weight
Detachable day pack
55+ liter capacity in main backpack (total of 70+)
Side attachments/pockets for water bottle (one on each side)
Outside strap attachment for tube w/fishing rod inside
Outside strap attachment for tent (either top or bottom)

Don’t really care whether it has an internal or external frame, but given the choice, I would probably go with an external frame.


Anybody have any ideas or suggestions?

Thanks.
 

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I just purchased a pack that meets all the criteria you mentioned except for the removable day pack.

Although the one I got was a tad bit bigger. 90L High Sierra Classic 2 Series Long Trail 90 Frame Pack

I won't use it till the middle of next month, so I can't tell you how it works just yet.

There are so many packs available out there it is almost mind boggling when trying to decide on a specific one to purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yup, it is hard to select one. There are so many that are similar that it is hard to determine which one is the best option, then there are those like myself, who are looking for something that just isn't out there much.

Maxpedition has a good line with a great reputation, but all of their packs seem to be smaller than what I am looking for and I couldn't find one that had a removable day pack.

Eberlestock is pretty much the same thing, I don't see anything with a removable day pack.

I did get the 5.11 Rush 72 and the Moab 10 to attach to it, but it has three things that cause me to want something else. 1. it is heavier than I would prefer. 2. I found the Moab 10 to be a good size, but it is just not real comfortable for me - maybe I just need to give it more time to get used to it. 3. I do wish that it was not so "military" looking - not a deal breaker, just a preference.

So basically, I am looking at something that has similar features to the Rush system that is lighter weight and doesn't scream out "look at me!" (I wonder if I could get one of the smaller Maxpedition bags to attach to the Rush 72 in the same manner as the Moab).

Until I do find that something that I am really looking for, i will continue to use my old Jansport or the Rush 72/Moab 10 combination.
 

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Would you consider putting the detachable day pack requirement on the shelf for the moment? I would get the backpack that suits you the best, lightweight, comfortable, exc, and then just buy a $20 dollar ultralight day pack (LLBean packable day pack, 18 liter's, 6 oz!) and throw it in a side pocket for when you need it. I think in the end you will have two products that do exactly what you need, as opposed to one pack that does two things 'ok'.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Would you consider putting the detachable day pack requirement on the shelf for the moment? I would get the backpack that suits you the best, lightweight, comfortable, exc, and then just buy a $20 dollar ultralight day pack (LLBean packable day pack, 18 liter's, 6 oz!) and throw it in a side pocket for when you need it. I think in the end you will have two products that do exactly what you need, as opposed to one pack that does two things 'ok'.
That is an approach that, honestly, I had not considered. I'll have to look around and see what is out there for small day packs that c an be folded/rolled up ands stuffed in a side pocket.

Thanks for the suggestion.
 

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You might want to take a look at something like the Camelbak Motherlode.
Not quite up to your desired ideal capacity but, incredibly easy to customize/accessorize externally.
And you can easily attach a smaller day type pack.
Or there might be another higher end Camelbak that you'll like more. Construction quality is excellent and they are great for organizing stuff internally.
 

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LA Police gear
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Are you looking for a backpack for real backpacking (maybe carrying guns or supplies) or just something you can carry for a few miles in a bugout situation?

If the former, then you need to look at a real backpacking manufacturer, not a gun bag manufacturer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You ever buy yourself a backpack?
Yup, a couple of them over the years. I have found that they all seem to have their pros and cons.

Some have the features I want, but are heavier that I want, while others are the weight and comfort I want, but are lacking something that i am looking for.

Not in a big hurry, I'll look until i find what I want and then get it. In the meantime, I have options that, while they are not really what I want, they do work for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Are you looking for a backpack for real backpacking (maybe carrying guns or supplies) or just something you can carry for a few miles in a bugout situation?

If the former, then you need to look at a real backpacking manufacturer, not a gun bag manufacturer.
Looking for a backpack for "real" backpacking. I want something that will allow me to carry what I need for a week "on the trail".

In this case "bugout" is not really a concern. I already have something that will work for that and anything that I end up getting will be appropriate for use as a backpacking pack or a BOB (although BOB is low on my list of requirements).
 

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Well, I used to be an active backpacker and pretty knowledgeable. But now I'm old and fat.

I strongly recommend you go to a local backpacking shop, preferably one that's been around a few years and run by experienced people. DON'T buy mail order. Pay a little premium to buy locally and get your pack fitted to you.

A week is a long time, figure 5500 cubic inches. That's the size of my current backpack, a 25 yo Mountain Smith Professional. To that I added another 1000 cubic inches in pockets. This bag is no longer made and my understanding is that Mountain Smith is no longer a premium backpack, but I could be wrong.

Look here for a start: The Best Backpacks of 2016

I can't give you any guidance as I'm way too far out of it, but a good shop can. Be prepared to spend lots of money of course. Quality costs and a failed backpack 15 miles from the nearest road is a real problem.

Buy quality everywhere.

I've been in a failed cheap tent during a summer 10" snow fall in Wyoming and got a wet sleeping bag, which meant I spent 4 more nights cold. And I've been in a quality tent on New Year's Eve, above timberline in the Rockies, -20 or so and high wind gusts, without difficulty. Quality pays.

Note: this is a traditional approach. You can also investigate "ultralight backpacking" which means what it says and can save a lot of weight. But then the gear is even more expensive and you have very little reserve - materials are very light, your sleeping bag is just barely warm enough, your tent isn't really a tent. Your choice of course. I never paid attention to this approach but it's certainly legit.
 

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Yup, a couple of them over the years. I have found that they all seem to have their pros and cons.
Yeah sorry I should have clarified, I meant, did you find one regarding the post you initially made. I agree with you, don't rush it. One additional suggestion would be using a company like REI. The great thing about them is that you can buy a backpack and use for a whole year and then if you don't like it you can return it, no questions asked. I certainly don't abuse this policy, but I have most definitely bought items from them, actually used them on a trip and then got home and immediately returned them because they didn't work out.
 

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Yeah sorry I should have clarified, I meant, did you find one regarding the post you initially made. I agree with you, don't rush it. One additional suggestion would be using a company like REI. The great thing about them is that you can buy a backpack and use for a whole year and then if you don't like it you can return it, no questions asked. I certainly don't abuse this policy, but I have most definitely bought items from them, actually used them on a trip and then got home and immediately returned them because they didn't work out.
Exactly what I was thinking and you can try them on and see what fits you best and if you try it and it isn't as comfy as you thought, they'll take it back.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah sorry I should have clarified, I meant, did you find one regarding the post you initially made. I agree with you, don't rush it. One additional suggestion would be using a company like REI. The great thing about them is that you can buy a backpack and use for a whole year and then if you don't like it you can return it, no questions asked. I certainly don't abuse this policy, but I have most definitely bought items from them, actually used them on a trip and then got home and immediately returned them because they didn't work out.

No, haven't picked up anything yet. I will probably not get anything before teh end of the year, but definately want something before springtime.

As for REI - I have thought about that also. I have an REI member **** and currently have my last years rebate waiting for me to use so I will definitely go down and talk to them before I jump into anything.
 

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It's hard to beat Osprey for comfortable, well designed, high quality hiking backpacks.
 
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