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Can't really say anything bad about mine. Reasonably accurate, no failures to feed or eject, not much recoil. The grip screws will loosen up when firing, but a little blue loc-tite or clear finger nail polish will fix that. It is as big as some of the smaller 9mm pistols, so maybe not as attactive as it originally was. I would buy another if in the market for a .380
 

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I have a friend who just bought one and loves it. His only complaint is in finding ammo.
 

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I carry one daily.....very accurate/dependable with any ammo I've used.
Good. solid. underated piece. :hand10:
 

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I own the Thunder CC (.380). Very reliable and fun to shoot. Perfect size for the wife. When loaded with premium defensive ammo it's plenty potent and with 8+1 I'd say that it will do it's job. Light and easy to carry, snag-free design, and easy on the eyes. What's not to like?

The rate of exchange between USA and Argentina means that Argentina is just about the only place on the planet where one dollar is a huge amount of money. If Bersa's were made in Germany they'd cost more than double what they do now.

So, they are one of the best values on the gun market today IMHO.



More photos of my Bersa here.

Also check out one of my favorite forums, BersaTalk.com
 

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Years ago the Bersa would get you laughed out of a gun shop, just like the Davis, Lorcin, Cobras etc.... But they have come a long way. Heck even I have one, lol!!!! For rounds I carry nothing but Buffalo Bore, the smaller the round the more of a hot load I want!!!

NCH
 

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My experience has been all good:

Pro's
-Very accurate
-Soft recoil
-Inexpensive to purchase
-decent sights
-Reliable; mine was 100% with anything I've ever put in it

Con's
-It's size; if you can carry this there are lot's of 9mm options in the same size package; I have a hard time justifying carrying a .380 which is nominal (or worse) for self defense when I can carry a 9mm just as conveniently
-Availability and cost of .380 ammo. It's expensive and not readily available and higher end ammo is almost ridiculous for cost
-has a VERY heavy double action pull which is what you're facing if yiou carry this for self defense. Most people load it with one in the chamber and leave the safety off. It's safe but the first round requires a heavy double action pull; after that it's an "ok" single action pull. The safety is small and still and not something I'd want to be messing with in a SD situation. I don't know if the DA pull can be lightened. I suspect a good gunsmith could but it's likely to cost you as much as the gun and again, if you're going to spend that much money you should at least consider a 9mm.
 

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I agree with Gideon. .380 ammo is hard to find. I looked into getting the Bersa and found reviews were mixed. I handled one at a store was was surprised at its size--big for a .380, especially compared to the P3AT and others.

I considered it for a pocket gun, but it's too big. When you can get a Glock 29 (9mm) or 27 (.40) in the same size gun (or one of many other sub-compact makes), I don't see any advantage of the Bersa Thunder other than it's a few bucks less.

You need to consider what you want in a firearm: size and concealibility?; stopping power?; number of rounds?; dependability and reliability?

Once you sort out your priorities, you can determine what to look for. Don't let the name-brand lovers lead you astray. There're advantages and disadvantages to every make and model. I don't think any one model is perfect for every occasion.

For me, the Glock 30 in .45 auto was what I chose based on stopping power, availability, and price, in that order. Is it the perfect gun? No. I changed out the slide lock lever and painted the white dots sights dayglo orange. It made a good gun better (for me).
 

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I have one that is my wife's gun. She doesn't have her CCW yet and because it is a little large for a petite gal we will probably get her an LCP or P3AT when she actually decides to carry. Even with that I think we will keep the Bersa. It's reliable, simple, and plain fun to shoot. It goes bang every time you pull the trigger.
 

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i considered a bersa for small carry but there are so many small 9s in the same size range now it seems like less than a good bet unless youre looking for a gun with a bit more manageable kick...ive heard nothing but good things about them at the range...but the availability and expense of .380 makes it less than economical for the range...

in a .380 i'm going pocket carry...(lcp, pf9, tcp)....in the bersa size range i'm thinking a small 9 is a better buy...
 

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I have a regular Thunder .380 which has become a safe queen due to the fact I can carry my Taurus PT111 for about the same size/weight. It is incredibly accurate and easy to shoot. My fiancee had actually stolen it from me she liked it so much. Since she found a .380cc I got it back. Both Bersas are well made, excellent F&F, very accurate, and 100% reliable with any .380 run through them. Can't beam them for the money.
 

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IMO, the BEST value for the money out there, hands down.

They aren't finished as nicely as a SIG or H&K, but they are tough, very reliable and really accurate .380s. I sold my 380CC a few weeks ago, and am already regretting it!
 

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the bersa thunder concealed carry is the nicer model...
Wife wanted one, she shoots it very well.
No doubt, the Bersa .380 CC is a good choice. My wife and I both have one. They are great during warmer months when wearing light clothes. During winter months I carry my Bersa .45 UC which is also a reliable, accurate carry piece.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/pianoman5355317/Bersa380CC001.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/pianoman5355317/Bersa45.jpg
 

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Seems by previous posts that my experience(s) w/the BERSA T380 are definitely in the MINORITY.

Anyways, bought the wifey a BERSA T380 for her to use as her CCW almost 2 yrs ago for $300 and have unfortunately found it to quite problematic.:twak:

We've experienced the following:
- rear sites fell off after 50 rounds
- trigger re-set spring/retaining E-Clip fell off into the grips
- safety decocker so stiff/tight it took 2 thumbs to engage/disengage.
- VERY prone to FTF's due to ammo brand and "limp-wrisitng" so you basically have to squeeze the living crap out of it.
- "hail-mary" accuracy at anything over 5yrds
- considerable recoil??? 60+ rounds....yer done. - Hands hurt to much - I'm guessing due to the blow-back design and fixed frame barrel?
- it's DEMANDS constant cleaning. It fouls and jams considerably after 60+ rounds (WWB) and requires a COMPLETE field stripping and scrubbing to maintain which in itself tends to be a pain.

Now we did have success sending it in to CGW (Colorado Gun Works) to have any/all mechanical issues addressed w/good results:
- Trigger disconnect spring/E-Clip - FIXED (upgraded parts)
- Safety Decocker - FIXED (removed burrs)
- Rear Sites - FIXED (gun re sighted)

And we did a wide variety of ammo brand "rotation" and found that ours likes PMC 95grn FMJ brand, and it seems to eat FED HYDRA-SHOK 90grn JHP decently. And with that, it's overall accuracy has greatly improved. Although I still wouldn't consider it an everyday range gun.

The gun itself the wifey still likes,(she did after all pick it) but for me it's definitely fallen out of favor as a RELIABLE weapon for CCW. So much so that we're currently planning to replace it for her w/a new SIG P238.
- But that too is debatable, due to due to the extreme $$$$ in .380 ammo and it's limited availability + the fact the problems w/the P238 seem to be mounting as well.

If your set on purchasing a BERSA just a heads-up... you may just get what you pay for........:tired:
 

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I would suggest anyone thinking of a new Bersa 380 to look into the disconnector spring problem cropping up everywhere with newer models.
It has been said by some that it should have been a recall event, it is swept under the rug by others. The older models seem to be OK, for the last year I have been watching the Bersa Talk forum, where you are not allowed to speak of this issue too much before you upset the Admins. Warranty service centers will fix the issue for original owners (lifetime warranty) at no charge but YOU pay the shipping to service. From what I have read the repair requires some work on the frame to prevent the spring from coming off.
It breaks with NO warning. Not good in a self defense firearm.

Do your own research.

For the record I have an older Thunder duo-tone 380 and a Matt black CC 380 models that have hundreds of rounds through them, they are both fine.


From the old Bersa talk website;

The C.G.W. (Colorado Gun Works) kindly made this post in Bersa Talk, I cut and copied, un-edited. For more of the entire post, click on the link.

:: Bersa Talk :: - IF YOU OWN A BERSA THUNDER 380 PLEASE READ THIS!!!!!

THE STANDARD AND CC MODELS:

Some early production runs of the Standard model saw frequent issue with the Thumb Safety either being or becoming hard to manipulate to engage or disengage. These repairs were dealt with on the repair center level and were generally a one time repair. This is still an occassional issue and with a very small number requiring repair than was experienced in the first couple of years.

For a short period of time within the last two years we saw a small cluster of Thumb Safeties that broke due to a run of bad castings, this also was true in a smaller number of Disaasembly Levers. The problem was addressed by the manufacturer and repairs were performed at the repair center level. To our knowledge this has generally been a one time repair.

We saw a rash of Bulged Barrels for a period of time with the majority being attributed to bad ammunition from one primary source. As with anything, the were and still are a very small number of cases of this, but all have been able to be confirmed as having been caused by an ammunition problem.

We have seen an issue with some of the CC model magazine followers failing due to the Slide Catch Lever chewing up their engagement surface. This has been a generally one time fix, by assuring that the Slide Catch Lever is sufficiently long enough in it's engagement point to not rest on the very ledge of the magazine follower. These repairs have been handled at the repair center level.

We have seen a small number of Standard & CC models that have had an issue with the Decocking feature not working. When the Thumb Safety is engaged, it disconnected the trigger but failed to decock the hammer. These have been simple one time fixes performed at the repair center level.

This brings us to the Disconnector Spring Issue. We have seen an issue with the Disconnector Spring become more of an issue of concern within the last year. We have found that the issue is extremely complex due to the number of things that can have an effect on the spring in question. Some of these issues include the following:

Spring Breakage: We saw this mostly caused by a bad batch of springs used in the manufacture of the pistols. The bad batch of springs seemed to have come from a group of spring formed in a manner that caused them to be brittle at the straight leg of the spring where it connected to the loop. These springs were bright silver in color and under magnification the weak spot could sometimes actually be seen as a fold in the spring metal caused during the shaping of the spring. The factory is aware of this and has taken measures to assure those springs are not used. However there is no way of knowing how many were used and shipped out. As they present themselves the will be repaired at the warranty center level. THERE IS NO WAY OF KNOWING THE SPECIFIC SERIAL NUMBERS THAT THESE SPRIG MAY HAVE BEEN USED IN MAKING ANY RECALL IMPOSSIBLE.

Spring breakage has also been detected in other forms by such things as being improperly adjusted by none authorized personnel, or those that do not understand the propper method of adjusting the spring.

Spring Breakage has also been observed as occuring from consumers using items in a probing method while cleaning the frame and magazine well area of the pistol. The spring is sometime struck and dislodged from it's correct placement from within the magazine well. THIS IS AN ISSUE THAT CAN ONLY BE CORRECTED THROUGH EDUCATION OF THE CONSUMER.

Some of the Disconnector Springs have become dislodged from the disconnector and do not deliver sufficient upward force to engauge the disconnector allowing the firing mechanism to operate correctly. This can be caused by several methods.

The issue with over zelous cleaning in the magazine area has already been discussed in the preceding paragraphs.

Some of the springs develop a "torque" with use in the loop area of the spring and can actually pop out of place during usage. Most of these can be repaired with proper adjustment, however the number of rounds fired and the amount of use can cause this to re-occure. There is no way of determining which spring will redevelop this problem. ON THIS TOPIC I REFER TO THE PRACTICE OF NOT RELYING ON ANY FIREARM FOR DEFENSIVE PURPOSE UNTIL IT HAS HAD A MINIMUM OF 1000 ROUNDS FIRED THROUGH IT TO ASSURE THAT ANY ISSUES THAT MAY DEVELOP HAVE HAD SUFFICIENT TIME TO APPEAR AND BE REPAIRED. THIS IS STANDARD PRACTICE IN MANY LE AGENCIES.

Some Pistols have been found to have an issue with the Disconnector Spring "twisting" in the frame and needing to be restaked into place in the frame. THIS SHOLD NOT BE DONE WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING FOR RUNNING THE CHANCE OF PERMANENT DAMAGE TO THE FRAME.

Some of these issues have just been figured out within the last few weeks of 2008. The factory has made adjustments, and the importers are doing everything they can to supply the warranty centers with new parts and information to deal with these issues. We track our numbers and have found that fewer than 1% of the pistols repaired for Disconnector Spring problem is returned for the same problem. Some of the springs that were breaking due to a manufacturing issue were subsequently replaced with the same type of spring. This was before the cause had been discovered.

Lastly on the disconnector spring issue I must address the issue of consumers wanting to "tinker" with their pistol, or see if they can figure out what was repaired by the warranty center. To this I put forth the following:

IF YOU ARE NOT A QUALIFIED WARRANTY REPAIR TECHNICIAN THEN DO NOT DISASSEMBLE YOUR PISTOL BEYOND FIELD STRIPPING FOR CLEANING!!!

Some of the loops on the disconnector spring may tip in, some may tip out, others will be straight. Please let the warranty center technicians repair the pistol not you.

As stated before, there are always small numbers of issues with different things that may need adjusted or repaired. This is why there is a "Lifetime Warranty" for these pistols.
 

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Seems by previous posts that my experience(s) w/the BERSA T380 are definitely in the MINORITY.
I also had problems with my T380 and wound up never carrying it.

I experienced the following (borrowing Cups' format with my own edits):

- very frequent failures caused by disconnector spring
- safety decocker stiff/tight
- prone to FTF's due to limp-wristing
- more recoil than you'd expect in this calibre and weight - guessing due to the blow-back design, fixed frame barrel and aluminum frame
- it demands constant cleaning. It fouls and jams considerably after 80+ rounds of WWB
- weight-to-calibre ratio and many sharp edges make it impractical for CC

My ex-wife loved the gun and was very accurate (except when using Remington ammo), but she'd get FTFeeds every now and then if she didn't lock up her wrists tight. The disconnector spring would work itself out of the notch where it resides after approx 70 rds or so, rendering the gun useless and would require removing the right grip to reset it.
The disconnector issue can be resolved easily by sending it in to CGW (Colorado Gun Works), but considering the weight of the gun and the size, I didn't feel it was worth the $40 to ship it - considering I was never going to carry it anyway. It sits in my closet now until I figure out what to do with it - don't feel comfortable selling a gun that isn't trustworthy.

My Kahr K9 is basically the same size and slightly heavier with the same round count and a more potent cartridge.
 

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My wife and I can't really say anything bad about ours. They're well-built, very accurate, and easy to carry and shoot (with minimal recoil). Sorta makes me feel like James Bond, though - just the look and feel.
 
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