Defensive Carry banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Which polymer gun manufacturer do you think does the best finish on their pistols right now.

I've heard people talk about their Smith & Wessons being susceptible to rust. I personally do not have that experience but after googling, I've seen quite a few testimonials of M&P 2.0's rusting.

Here is an article where they talk about the rust on the M&P

I'm curious to know who you think does it the best and why you think so.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,370 Posts
Tennifer on older Glocks is outstanding, although the new finish on Glocks is subject to complaints. It is a form of Ferritic nitrocarburization. Melonite, Tufftride, and ARCOR are trade names for slightly different forms and processes.

Ferritic nitrocarburizing

Ferritic nitrocarburizing or FNC, also known by the proprietary names Tenifer, Tufftride and Melonite as well as ARCOR, is a range of proprietary case hardening processes that diffuse nitrogen and carbon into ferrous metals at sub-critical temperatures during a salt bath.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Tennifer on older Glocks is outstanding, although the new finish on Glocks is subject to complaints. It is a form of Ferritic nitrocarburization. Melonite, Tufftride, and ARCOR are trade names for slightly different forms and processes.

Ferritic nitrocarburizing

Ferritic nitrocarburizing or FNC, also known by the proprietary names Tenifer, Tufftride and Melonite as well as ARCOR, is a range of proprietary case hardening processes that diffuse nitrogen and carbon into ferrous metals at sub-critical temperatures during a salt bath.
Then Glock adds a PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) coating on top of that so I’d vote Glock at the moment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,263 Posts
I have carried Glocks on duty for several years in the sun, rain, & humidity and I have found their rust resistance to be excellent. I live near a very large Glock Blue Label Distributor that gets a lot of police trade ins when they sell agencies new weapons. To my eyes, Glock and the finish on the HK USP seems to be very rust resistant. I have seen some rust on some PX4's and a few M&P's around the rear sight, so it actually could have been the sight itself that was rusting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,988 Posts
Living on the humid Gulf Coast of Alabama I have not had any problems with rust or corrosion on my M&P Shield, M&P 22 Compact or any of my Glocks (gen 3's & gen 4). So far I have not had any problems with my Sig P-365 but I have only been carrying it for 6 months. Time will tell. FWIW, my Shield has often been on the boat and kayaks in saltwater. When I was still working as a cop a couple of my Glocks got completely dunked in brackish saltwater all with no ill effects. IME, holsters especially leather and leather hybrid DO NOT survive saltwater immersion well at all! That is why in my humid salty climate and environment it is kydex/polymer for EDC for me!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Another vote for Glock. Never a rust problem on several Gen 3s. Seems to be as good or even better than stainless ( also have several ).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,337 Posts
I have a different view on this timely topic.

I think we now have a generation who obsesses excessively over surface finish durability all while deliberately seeking to avoid firearms maintenance to the point of uncaring laziness. They are very concerned with "keeping up appearances" but don't want to invest any time to do what it takes to conserve either appearance or function.

This isn't directed at fine Forum folk here, but it is observable in comments heard with much frequency at shooting ranges, gun shop counters, gun show exhibit tables, and read on firearms forums.

The long time favorite handgun here has a simple blued finish. Sure it's worn from decades of use, but it's honest wear. It remains unravaged by rust to this day. It's suffered excessive shooting use, much holster wear, been filthy from shooting, sweated on, had blood on it, had Coca Cola spilled on it, been dunked completely under water in a lake on more than one occasion, been gritty with sand, dust, grime, been dropped, and has even been carried a few times in my wife's purse for cryin' out loud and it doesn't get any worse than that. It yet retains most of its blued finish.

There are more "usin' guns" here just like it, blued steel subjected to whatever life experiences I throw at them. All corrosive effects can be avoided with just a modicum of effort. The soft accumulations of honest wear around the edges isn't a big deal on a gun that serves. It just isn't.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,370 Posts
@bmcgilvray

"There are more "usin' guns" here just like it, blued steel subjected to whatever life experiences I throw at them. All corrosive effects can be avoided with just a modicum of effort. The soft accumulations of honest wear around the edges isn't a big deal on a gun that serves. It just isn't."

Bravo!

A blued gun, whether new, worn and loved, is a truly gorgeous finish. I can't say that for the others, except maybe a brushed stainless or nickel plate job, but those are a wee bit "show boat". A good honest bluing is a superb statement on today's society and the transitory nature of beauty.

You just made my weekend, Bryan, even though I have many of all types.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Tennifer on older Glocks is outstanding, although the new finish on Glocks is subject to complaints. It is a form of Ferritic nitrocarburization. Melonite, Tufftride, and ARCOR are trade names for slightly different forms and processes.

Ferritic nitrocarburizing

Ferritic nitrocarburizing or FNC, also known by the proprietary names Tenifer, Tufftride and Melonite as well as ARCOR, is a range of proprietary case hardening processes that diffuse nitrogen and carbon into ferrous metals at sub-critical temperatures during a salt bath.
From what I've read, Glock no longer uses salt bath nitrocarborizing. They now use a gaseous nitriding process. Is this as good, I don't know. But there have been complaints.

I don't know how the Gen 5 PVD finish fits into this. The older Glocks were something of a two layer process. There was the nitrocarborizing treatment of the carbon steel slide, which was then give a cosmetic black finish, the type of which seemed to vary over time/generation. I don't know if the PVD finish on the Gen 5 is applied over the already nitrided steel on the slide, or if it replaces the nitriding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I have to cast another vote for Glock when it comes to durability ... at least the gen 2, 3, and 4. But only a nice deep bluing will make my heart smile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,263 Posts
From what I've read, Glock no longer uses salt bath nitrocarborizing. They now use a gaseous nitriding process. Is this as good, I don't know. But there have been complaints.

I don't know how the Gen 5 PVD finish fits into this. The older Glocks were something of a two layer process. There was the nitrocarborizing treatment of the carbon steel slide, which was then give a cosmetic black finish, the type of which seemed to vary over time/generation. I don't know if the PVD finish on the Gen 5 is applied over the already nitrided steel on the slide, or if it replaces the nitriding.

According to the Glock employee who taught the Glock Armorer's Course I attended last year, the slide is still treated and then given the "cosmetic finish" as a top layer. I have a Gen 5 G26 that has a nice finish to it but I did manage to scuff it one day doing some training. Thus far the scratch has not begun to show any corrosion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Just anecdotal, but I have carried an LCP2 in a remora in warm weather for 3 years and it wears well. I do clean it fairly often, but it has been on my hip for lawn mowing and everything else in warm sweaty weather


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top