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Discussion Starter #1
I made another thread a couple days ago and most of the responses told me to post my location and ask for schools in the area. So I figured I would listen to that advice.

Any of yall know of any good schools in NYC, NJ, Connecticut, Eastern PA or Southern NY state. Thanks for the responses.

I am looking for schools geared towards tactical training or defensive style classes.
 

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No such thing as a tactical training school in the North East. You will be better off getting some books or looking on line for drills to run at the range. That is if the range you go to will allow it. I left NY 5 years ago. As a NRA Rifle, Pistol, Shotgun Instructor and Range Safety Office I would not recommend anything at all. Lots of make believe instructors that will take your money. Good Luck in your search.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No such thing as a tactical training school in the North East. You will be better off getting some books or looking on line for drills to run at the range. That is if the range you go to will allow it. I left NY 5 years ago. As a NRA Rifle, Pistol, Shotgun Instructor and Range Safety Office I would not recommend anything at all. Lots of make believe instructors that will take your money. Good Luck in your search.

Oh man! That was not the answer I wanted to hear, but thanks a lot for being honest. These things are expensive and I would hate to waste a months salary on snake oil. lol. Since you clearly know your stuff, any books or online drills you recommend?
 

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It is a good long drive up to Rochester NY or over to the Sig Acadamy.

But while you are in the area, if you have a love of old WW1 era planes and flying, don't forget to visit the Rhinebeck, NY Airdrome in Dutchess County. It's along the Hudson and not very far north in your area. I can't believe I used to drive by there and never knew it existed.

50 years ago ? Ulster and Sullivan Counties in upstate NY had large tracks of public hunting grounds. Check out Willowemoc in Ulster. Also many good trout streams in the area.

Much further up into NYS are the Adirondack Mountains and Lake Placid where they held the Olympics years ago. Great hunting, fishing, camping and canoeing up there. Many lakes to camp at.

Once you get out of the cities and go rural, having a motorcycle will be a pleasure. There are many two lane roads and off roads to enjoy after work.

Also, that area is famous for Revolutionary War cites. You'll see road signs everywhere.

Just watch out for NJ. Read very carefully their arrest history for even having hollowpoints in your possession. The area ain't what it used to be. The same applies to the pocket knives you carry. I'll never forget the stir I created when after being gone for years in the Midwest, I showed up at a family gathering in NYC and all the policemen in the family zeroed in on the Buck knife folder on my belt. That's a no-no now along with what may be in your pocket. Stop and frisk may have been in effect back then, but many restrictive policies are still in place from what I hear and read.
 

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bodan399 said:
Thank you. I am going to keep it in mind and if there are none closer that may be the one I go to. How does it compare to the other big name schools like Gunsite?
This is the only school I've ever been to, so I can't compare, and I've never taken any of their advanced tactical courses. I liked the courses I took, and all the instructors I've met (not very many) have been either ex-military or law enforcement, FWIW.

I wouldn't hesitate to take tactical courses there if it weren't for the fact that my body is starting to break down (arthritis, etc.), and I fear I wouldn't be able to keep up.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is a good long drive up to Rochester NY or over to the Sig Acadamy.

But while you are in the area, if you have a love of old WW1 era planes and flying, don't forget to visit the Rhinebeck, NY Airdrome in Dutchess County. It's along the Hudson and not very far north in your area. I can't believe I used to drive by there and never knew it existed.

50 years ago ? Ulster and Sullivan Counties in upstate NY had large tracks of public hunting grounds. Check out Willowemoc in Ulster. Also many good trout streams in the area.

Much further up into NYS are the Adirondack Mountains and Lake Placid where they held the Olympics years ago. Great hunting, fishing, camping and canoeing up there. Many lakes to camp at.

Once you get out of the cities and go rural, having a motorcycle will be a pleasure. There are many two lane roads and off roads to enjoy after work.

Also, that area is famous for Revolutionary War cites. You'll see road signs everywhere.

Just watch out for NJ. Read very carefully their arrest history for even having hollowpoints in your possession. The area ain't what it used to be. The same applies to the pocket knives you carry. I'll never forget the stir I created when after being gone for years in the Midwest, I showed up at a family gathering in NYC and all the policemen in the family zeroed in on the Buck knife folder on my belt. That's a no-no now along with what may be in your pocket. Stop and frisk may have been in effect back then, but many restrictive policies are still in place from what I hear and read.
You are right. I know a lot of people in NJ and have heard the nightmare stories over there. I am honestly afraid to even travel through there lol. Do you happen to know the name of the place in Rochester? I may take a weekend trip up there and do some of the activities you recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is the only school I've ever been to, so I can't compare, and I've never taken any of their advanced tactical courses. I liked the courses I took, and all the instructors I've met (not very many) have been either ex-military or law enforcement, FWIW.

I wouldn't hesitate to take tactical courses there if it weren't for the fact that my body is starting to break down (arthritis, etc.), and I fear I wouldn't be able to keep up.

That sounds good enough for me. Thank you.
 

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You are right. I know a lot of people in NJ and have heard the nightmare stories over there. I am honestly afraid to even travel through there lol. Do you happen to know the name of the place in Rochester? I may take a weekend trip up there and do some of the activities you recommended.
If you heading to Rochester, https://safeinrochester.com/
 

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Oh, I forgot Lime Rock Park Racetrack in western Conn. I spent a few weekends there. A great spectator track if you don't compete. Back in the day, I loved watching the SCCA races. The shop I worked in for a while ran a MGB/GT.
 

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Many of the talented trainers travel and are hosted at range facilities.
You may find it easier to attend a class that way. Especially if you haven’t trained previously.

You can take a bit of a beating in fighting classes. I am stiff and sore for a couple of days after a ground fighting course, post-vehicle cqb my knees and shins are black and blue. Even loading mags over and over gets tough in high round count classes.

My personal recommendation would be to take a fighting pistol one class to get your feet under you with someone doing a smaller group before looking at week long courses.
 

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There are also some good instructors/courses at big ranges. It can be hit or miss, though, so I would ask for references.
 

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I have a wish list of people I would like to get to, in no order of importance: Craig Douglas, William Petty, Steve Fisher and Ellifritz, I’m attending in May; and a whole bunch after that.

GMan and I can’t seem to put together time and a place to work together again, but we keep trying.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Many of the talented trainers travel and are hosted at range facilities.
You may find it easier to attend a class that way. Especially if you haven’t trained previously.

You can take a bit of a beating in fighting classes. I am stiff and sore for a couple of days after a ground fighting course, post-vehicle cqb my knees and shins are black and blue. Even loading mags over and over gets tough in high round count classes.

My personal recommendation would be to take a fighting pistol one class to get your feet under you with someone doing a smaller group before looking at week long courses.
That sounds like a good idea. I am certainly going to take that approach. What would be the best way to find "talented trainers". Is there any sort of list or anything with a bunch of the top trainers names that you know of?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have a wish list of people I would like to get to, in no order of importance: Craig Douglas, William Petty, Steve Fisher and Ellifritz, I’m attending in May; and a whole bunch after that.

GMan and I can’t seem to put together time and a place to work together again, but we keep trying.

Wow I should have finished reading the thread before I responded. You already answered my question. lol! This is great thank you. I am about to write those names down and keep it in a safe place so I can find out where they are going to be teaching. Thanks a lot!
 

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Another thought on this is if it is hard to find schools and courses, there is a lot you can do on your own at home. Basic marksmanship skills can never be developed enough. You can do that through dry fire, the pencil drill, a pellet gun, etc. It is not the whole tactical package, but it is a component you can develop on your own and it is a perishable skill. Basic gun handling is another thing. Just simple drawing from concealment cannot be practiced too much.

Then if you can get to a range, there are all sort of drills you can do. The idea is to improve, not just to rack up cool sounding courses. Frankly, I have taken some courses that were a complete waste of time for me. There is also private instruction. The hourly rates may look high, but an hour of personal instruction from someone who really knows what they are doing can be priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Another thought on this is if it is hard to find schools and courses, there is a lot you can do on your own at home. Basic marksmanship skills can never be developed enough. You can do that through dry fire, the pencil drill, a pellet gun, etc. It is not the whole tactical package, but it is a component you can develop on your own and it is a perishable skill. Basic gun handling is another thing. Just simple drawing from concealment cannot be practiced too much.

Then if you can get to a range, there are all sort of drills you can do. The idea is to improve, not just to rack up cool sounding courses. Frankly, I have taken some courses that were a complete waste of time for me. There is also private instruction. The hourly rates may look high, but an hour of personal instruction from someone who really knows what they are doing can be priceless.
That was actually what I originally was planning on doing. Finding some sort of book or video to buy, that shows the basic drills(pencil drill, etc) and just practicing them in my house/backyard. Any resources that you know of that could help me get started with the at home learning? Thanks.
 

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I like Chris Sajnog's channel on YouTube. He also has a website and sells books. He is a former Navy SEAL sniper and firearms instructor. He specializes in coaching people to learn on their own.
 
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