Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,117 Posts
Saw that over the weekend. Thanks for the work putting that video together; nicely done.

A BP revolver is, IMO, still a viable option if things ever degrade to the point of mass confiscation or in states where purchasing is extremely difficult. But they're not for the novice, and people should actually practice with them to perfect the loading and firing which as you point out isn't as reliable as centerfire ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,024 Posts
Saw that over the weekend. Thanks for the work putting that video together; nicely done.

A BP revolver is, IMO, still a viable option if things ever degrade to the point of mass confiscation or in states where purchasing is extremely difficult. But they're not for the novice, and people should actually practice with them to perfect the loading and firing which as you point out isn't as reliable as centerfire ammo.
At that point, they're taking slingshots, BB guns, anything that fires a projectile.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,370 Posts
BP sent many a man to their grave. Worked then. Works now. Beautiful works of art too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I own several originals of Civil War vintage, Colt Navy .36, Colt Army .44, Remington New Army .44. The fact that they are over 150 years old has nothing to do with their function or effectiveness. Functionally accurate to at least 50 yards and plenty of power for defensive use.

These would not be my first choice for self defense, but I would not feel unarmed at all. With practice and experience a very good result can be expected. Of course, there are reasons why Civil War cavalrymen, outlaws, and many lawmen frequently carried two, three, or more revolvers. There are certain limitations that must be taken under consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
My last feral hog was taken with a BP firearm. They go boom, they send lead down range. And if it hits it's target it's game over, lights out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,950 Posts
Several scenarios make non-cartridge, pre-Twentieth Century charcoal-burners relevant, for defensive purposes. Some of these scenarios are because laws have largely ignored such tools, in many areas. Other scenarios are supply-line issues, as a resourceful user can manufacture what is needed to keep shooting. One thing I noticed, during the current corona-scare, is that some black powder shooting supplies have become scarce, at the retail level, as if some were prepping for a zombie apocalypse.

Do, of course, check local laws. Federal law is kind to pre-1899 clack powder firearms, but, in some jurisdictions, a “handgun” or “pistol” license ONLY allows carry of handguns that meet the federal definition of those words.

In places that do not require a carry license, in order to carry black powder weapons, well, this may be a viable option for those whose carry licenses are expiring during the social distancing mandates. I am not kidding.

I see sticks and stout blades as being viable defensive implements, so, I would be foolish to think that a cap-and-ball revolvers could not be used defensively. (Yes, stick and blades. A 26” baton, either hardwood and/or collapsible metal, was part of my duty gear for 34 years. My blades training has been much less, and sporadic, mostly to learn how to avoid getting stabbed or cut, but I have internalized some basic techniques, particularly a few that are common to stick/baton usage.)

I bought my Ruger Old Army revolver some number of years ago, for recreational/nostalgic reasons, but a .457* round ball will make a hole in an attacker. The chief disadvantage of my Ruger Old Army, for defensive carry, is its size and weight, not the fact that it uses non-cartridge ammo.

*For those who say that they carry a .45, because “they don’t make a .46,” well, yes, Ruger made excellent Forty-Sixes. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,739 Posts
It sure did work great back in the day when everyone used them.
I would hate to go up against someone with a center fire rifle or pistol today.
Though if you light up a few rounds maybe the smoke screen will obscure their vision
Worked great dry, if you had caps, minus a chainfire or two
 

·
Registered
Various
Joined
·
15,567 Posts
I have a book on my family's history. One of my distant uncles served in the civil war. After the civil war, he served as a small town marshal. A guy committed a murder and my uncle arrested him. He was found guilty and the judge gave him two choices, got to prison or join the Army to fight indians. He joined the Army and went AWOL after basic. He returned to where my uncle lived and was telling people he was going to kill my uncle and his family. My uncle got his Remington New Army .44 and walked into town. He spotted the guy standing on the porch of the general store, aimed, and fired. He hit the guy in the forehead at ninety paces. He turned himself in and was tried. He was acquitted as justifiable homicide. There is a picture of his gun in the book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,924 Posts
Saw that over the weekend. Thanks for the work putting that video together; nicely done.

A BP revolver is, IMO, still a viable option if things ever degrade to the point of mass confiscation or in states where purchasing is extremely difficult. But they're not for the novice, and people should actually practice with them to perfect the loading and firing which as you point out isn't as reliable as centerfire ammo.
^^^I agree^^! Novices should look up chain fire! A BP revolver can be dangerous from both ends!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bad Bob

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
If I was worried about confiscation, I'd buy and build a 80% Glock clone, with the kit and all associated parts bought for cash at a gun show, no ID given.

Saw that over the weekend. Thanks for the work putting that video together; nicely done.

A BP revolver is, IMO, still a viable option if things ever degrade to the point of mass confiscation or in states where purchasing is extremely difficult. But they're not for the novice, and people should actually practice with them to perfect the loading and firing which as you point out isn't as reliable as centerfire ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,664 Posts
My first hog hunt was done with a Walker clone. One and done from about 20 yards. He didn't even get two feet from where I shot him.
The guide (they wouldn't let me go alone because they didn't think I had enough gun.) couldn't believe it.

Would not be my first choice, but would not feel unarmed if that is all I had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,950 Posts
The probability of chain-fire can be much-lessened with properly-fitting caps, and a good seal at the front of the cylinder. Some serious users will use candle wax, to enhance the seal around the nipple. There is reason to believe that many, if not most chain-fires are actually result of a flash-fire at the rear of the cylinder. Another reason to achieve a good seal, is to keep moisture from being absorbed by the powder. Moisture is the enemy of black powder.

It is not that I am advocating the use of cap-and-ball technology for self-defense, but neither will I totally dismiss it, especially in use cases that make cartridge weapons unavailable, for whatever reason.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top