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I like most types of guns, but I just don't understand whats so appealing about bolt action rifles. First off, lets talk about bolt action rifle calibers, they're outrageously expensive, sold in tiny quantities, and theirs just to many different calibers to begin with. also, why do shooters say "ought" instead of "zero"? Second, why are these things so darn heavy? am I the only person who needs both arms just to pick one of these beast up? its bad enough their the most inefficient firearms available, making them out of steel and walnut make um as effective as a baseball bat. I actually think your better off swinging the thing instead of shooting it. Third, whats the point of having a magazine for a gun like this? do people carry loaded spare mags? I guess bolt actions can be fun to shoot, and probably fill a market niche.

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They are specifically designed to engage large game at long ranges, not for self defense, though they work in a pinch. Have not seen anything short of an armored plate defeat a large caliber hunting round.........

On my 4th read of your OP, I see that you are just trying to 'bait' an argument from people................................... If that is the case, well... bugger off.
 

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If you want to see what is possible with a bolt-action rifle attend a high-power match. In the rapid-fire course you must get off 10 rounds within 60 seconds to include 1 reload, I am out of practice now but I sometimes had one alibi round. Another thing most bolt-action rifles have an inherent accuracy that cannot be matched by most semi-autos. Bolt guns can be loaded with a much larger variety of ammo, as an example a 30/06 can use bullets ranging from 90gr up to 250gr and can take anything from small game up and including elephant. When dealing with recoil in the larger rounds the weight helps mitigate the recoil. A gun designed for 30/06 may weigh 6 ½ or 7 pounds but when you move up to something like the 458 Win Mag the rifles may weigh 11 pounds or more. As far as the ought verses zero I have no clue there.
 

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Speaking from experience something awesome about wielding a bolt action and out shooting a semi auto on a unknown distance, timed course. Put you on a rooftop and live targets you get into shot placement that can either make or break your career. You want the most solid platform to make the shot with. Solid stocks are more heavy, thus, less "jump around" especially with large calibers.
 

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"its bad enough their the most inefficient firearms available, making them out of steel and walnut make um as effective as a baseball bat. I actually think your better off swinging the thing instead of shooting it"


I have a Lee-Enfield that would argue that comment.
 

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OP, what exactly is your point for posting this? It's obvious you don't like bolt guns. That's fine. Everybody has their personal opinions on guns. No problem. However I'm not sure what you hope to accomplish by bashing a particular type of firearm? If you're not intentionally baiting, then you would do well to learn the fine art of getting your point across in a manner that is less confrontational. Believe me when I tell you it will get you a lot farther in life.
 

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This could become a very instructive thread.







I'd keep the M1 here over this well-loved Model 1903-A3, purchased at 18 years old, but only for the M1's practicality. It'd be a heart-breaker to have to give up the most accurate open-sighted rifle on the place and the one with which the first couple of deer were collected, the first handloads were fabricated for, began a career in high-power rifle competition (yes Virginia, it is very practical to shoot the rapid-fire stages with an '03 Springfield), and one that I still relish shooting for pleasure. [violins may begin playing here] It's still accurate as ever and effective out to very long yardage with the potent .30-06 cartridge.

What I would not do is give up either the M1 or the '03A3 in favor of the AR 15 also kept around here, a piddly little lightweight rifle shooting a piddly little middling varmint cartridge. Only my opinion.

In fact, after that M1, the next 10 most favorite, most enjoyable rifles kept around here are all bolt-actions of some sort whether military or sporting.
 

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I agree with everything you guys said. Keep in mind that the best proven WW2 rifle was the semi auto M1 Garand. When it comes to reliability and accuracy the bolt actions rule
 

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A few of my favorites, Springfield M1903 (used in high-power competition), Parker-Hale M1200 in 30/06, Remington 788s in both .223 and 44Mag, Remington Model 521 in 22S/L/LR. Each has a purpose and are a joy to shoot.
 
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I like most types of guns, but I just don't understand whats so appealing about bolt action rifles.
Thoughts, from a relative neophyte (only having owned a few, myself) ...

Bolted actions basically handle higher pressures. Compare small-caliber arms to larger guns as you move up the scale, up through artillery. At some point, controlling the explosion can't be done with simpler, less-positive locking, or with simpler, less-stiff receivers/actions. In portable arms, they're used for larger calibers, greater distances ... ie, hunting, sniping. At one point, they were even used as anti-tank guns, where shooting at one of those from ~150yds wasn't generally conducive to surviving the encounter.

Being larger (in the larger calibers), generally, they seem to typically be more-heavily made, stiffer. Paired with stiff stocks, they'll jump around less than their lighter, lesser competitors. And they've got to, given the power of the cartridges they are typically made to handle. They form a decent platform for long-range scopes. With a well-designed stock, they can fit like a glove. Hard to reliably and repeatably engage something at 800+ yds if your equipment isn't quite up to the task. (I've seen precious few lighter, lesser-caliber, less-stiff rifles capable of matching their performance at distance, when reaching out to "knock down" something.)

Why "ought"? Tradition. It still means something.

Why magazines? They're handy and allow for efficient reloading in the field. With sniping situations, this becomes important. But most realize the benefit is general purpose. Besides, it's not the "boogey man" feature the liberty-haters would have us believe. And, yes, people with mags generally carry spares. That's the point, after all.

Effectivity similar to a baseball bat? Tell that to elk at 600-1000yds, or Taliban insurgents at similar distances ... that is, if you can raise 'em from the dead. Pretty effective, for what they are, actually. And that's the whole point. Try doing that equally well with an M1 Carbine, or an AR-15 in .556, or ...

Yes, newly-crafted examples of many models can be pricey. But then, many rifles are. Not all are, though. Check Savage's offerings, for one, or Remington's less well-known examples (these days) made in bygone years. Some can be had quite inexpensively, compared to anything else that can match the performance at distance. Consider the Mauser bolt-action large-ring K98-type rifle. A decent example can still be found for just a few hundred dollars, here and there, and it'll hold its own against most much more expensive rifles.

Efficiency? Depends whether you mean economy of motion, strictly, or suitability to task without waste. Seems to me that quality bolt-action rifles excel on both scores. Sure, a semi-auto doesn't require the added motion of racking the bolt. But a bolt-action rifle tends to be simplicity in action, without a plethora of unnecessary parts given the design. It does one thing pretty darned well, one that nearly every other platform can't quite match. "Efficient"? Yeah.

Market niche? All products fill such a thing. Some larger, some smaller. It is what it is. It just might not be yours (niche, that is).

Any other questions?
 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Well said!
 
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