Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am a lefty, so these are the only two pump shotguns I can easily use because of the tang safety.

Is there anybody out there who knows both have any comments on which one to use as a home/hurricane gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
I too am a lefty, so I feel your pain brother!

I got my BPS about 7-8 years ago. I had the same problems finding a good shotgun that was ambidextrous, until I found the BPS.

The fit and finish on the gun is far exceeds the price. I've seen $1000 shotguns that were not as good. All metal parts - no plastic.

I have never had a problem with feeding or ejecting shells, and the bottom ejection is sweet. I have well over a thousand shells through it and it has performed flawlessly.

Now for the bad...

The owners manual tells you not to disassemble the receiver and to take it to a gunsmith... :scruntiny: Taking it apart isn't too difficult, getting it back together and working is another matter. I had to use every swear word I've ever heard to persuade it to go back together. :aargh4::rant::aargh4:

Don't believe me? Try doing a google search on "Browning BPS Disassembly" for full instructions. I've only fully torn it down twice, once when I got it and about 2 years ago. For in-between cleanings I remove the barrel and the fore stock and hang the receiver in the garage with the gun pointing downward (this way the CLP and any crud runs away from the wood stock). Next, go to town with the CLP and toothbrush. You can get the innards of the receiver pretty clean this way. I usually let it hang overnight to let the excess CLP drip off. Reassemble. This works pretty good at keeping it clean so there isn't much need for a complete tear down.

Also google "Browning BPS Reviews" to see what others think. The BPS gets very good reviews from the pros and everyday hunters. Also, all models of the BPS use the same receiver, they just change the barrel, stock, finish, etc.

Hope this helped and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,908 Posts
Well, I'll probably take a little heat for this but here it goes.

The BPS is the better shotgun quality wise, there is no doubt. The fit and finish as well as materials used have it all over the Mossberg. If you intend on buying the gun and leaving it as is, I'd buy the BPS.

The Mossberg is a solid shotgun and will serve the purpose you intend it to just fine. The advantage is the Mossberg are a dime a dozen, as are parts or other add ons you might want to toss on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Have you considered a Remington 870? I am pretty sure you can switch the safety to left handed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,686 Posts
As a lefty, pick the BPS because it ejects empties out the bottom of the receiver rather than out the right-side and across your field-of-view with the potential of getting firing residue in your eyes. There's also a gunsmith (in Michigan I think?) who specializes in milling a right-side loading port in the BPS making for VERY fast drop-in, single-shell reloads for a lefty who needs one slug (or buckshot) alternative in-a-hurry! Not to mention...it's a Browning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,908 Posts
As a lefty, pick the BPS because it ejects empties out the bottom of the receiver rather than out the right-side and across your field-of-view with the potential of getting firing residue in your eyes. There's also a gunsmith (in Michigan I think?) who specializes in milling a right-side loading port in the BPS making for VERY fast drop-in, single-shell reloads for a lefty who needs one slug (or buckshot) alternative in-a-hurry! Not to mention...it's a Browning.
This is the biggest reason why I'd buy the BPS if I were left handed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,686 Posts
This is the biggest reason why I'd buy the BPS if I were left handed.
Because of all my silly rationalizations, or because it's a...BROWNING? ('Cause that last one is all the reason I need :yup:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,908 Posts
Because of all my silly rationalizations, or because it's a...BROWNING? ('Cause that last one is all the reason I need :yup:)
Well, I'm not left handed, so its tough for me to think about all the little things that I take for granted when almost all guns are made with a right handed person in mind.

The fact that its a Browning and built right is a bonus. :image035:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,686 Posts
I'm not a South-paw either. But my all-time, best shooting buddy is. So, much like a recent ex-President, "I feel his pain" & am somewhat sympathic to his pitible plight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
The fact that its a Browning and built right is a bonus. :image035:
Picked me up a Mossberg 500 Cruiser 12 ga. 20" recently. Granted, it's not a 590 but I had to have a 'pistol grip' HD shotgun. It's nice but pistol grip shotguns aren't what they're cracked up to be, at least for me.
The next weekend I saw a Browning BPS Hi-Cap. Fit, finish and quality seemed to me to be much better than the Mossberg. Found nothing but good reviews about. Picked it up and it is really nice. One drawback with the BPS though is that the smorgasboard of accessories for it aren't out there like they are for the Mossberg. But if you just want a straight, plain Jane top quality HD pump, you won't be dissappointed.

:hand10:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,686 Posts
Mossberg 500 Cruiser 12 ga. 20"... I had to have a 'pistol grip' HD shotgun.
When you pistol grip a Mossy shotgun, it puts my thumb wayyy too far away from the tang-mounted safety. Your results may vary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
To change an 870/1100 to left hand safety cost about $15 for the part and about 10 minutes. I am left handed and I have the mossberg, the 870 and a 1100 set-up for personal defense. Easy to use and easy to get parts / accessories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,051 Posts
If you go Mossberg. I believe the 590A1 should be the preferred option. Better parts, and quality control. Sort of like the difference between the 890 express verses the police models.

The 590 I believe is basically just a 500 with a bayonet lug.

BTW: I am lefthanded and my wife's 20 gauge 500 works pretty well for me. But, there is a certain appeal for bottom ejecting that one can't ignore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,908 Posts
The 590 I believe is basically just a 500 with a bayonet lug.
not really.

The 590 uses the Remington style barrel mounting, a heavier barrel and is generally built a bit more robust. The finish is also a heavy duty parkerizing. It was aimed at police and military buyers vs. casual homeowner type of buyers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
You should also look at used Ithaca Model 37's. Bottom eject and great shooters!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,051 Posts
not really.

The 590 uses the Remington style barrel mounting, a heavier barrel and is generally built a bit more robust. The finish is also a heavy duty parkerizing. It was aimed at police and military buyers vs. casual homeowner type of buyers.
I was under the impression that was the A1 model. That is incorrect?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks

To everybody who commented. I appreciate all of your input regarding the BPS High Capacity and the Mossberg 590. I know what I need to know to make the choice, when I get the chance.

I also want to thank those who passed info on about the non-tang safeties of other guns. I did not know that the safety could be flipped, and will keep that in mind if I acquire one.

Given my experience of over 45 years with tang safeties on double barrels, I would avoid the learning curve of the non-tang safety. I know that under stress I would like to fall back on training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,908 Posts
I was under the impression that was the A1 model. That is incorrect?
Yes, the items I listed are standard 590 things. The A1 has the military spec park job, all steel parts (trigger housing) and the bayonet lug. It also gets an even stronger barrel mount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I would get the BPS. When I was buying mine, my instructor told me that Mossberg and Remington could be accidently overloaded and jammed, but Winchester 1300 and BPS couldn't. Winchester has long been discontinued, unfortunately. As for direct chamber loading, the professionals, I was told, were trained not to use it for the consistency of operations.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top