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Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu or Krav Maga for practical self defense?

  • Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    Votes: 5 14.3%
  • Krav Maga

    Votes: 22 62.9%
  • Other (please specify)

    Votes: 8 22.9%

  • Total voters
    35
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Discussion Starter #1
I want to begin taking a martial art for practical, self-defense purposes only.

I'm curious about Krav Maga, though I have had some experience with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. I want to be able to quickly and effectively defend myself should I be in a situation where the use of a weapon is not preferable or possible.

Here are the two schools from which I would train at depending on which style I decide upon:

Krav Maga: http://www.performanceselfdefense.com
BJJ: http://www.ndbjj.com

Again, my only experience with any martial art comes from three months of consistent training in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu over four years ago. At the time, I could not afford to continue training for any longer than that, and I haven't returned since. I had the great honor of learning from (now black belt) Orlando Waugh, but he has moved too far away from me to train under him again.

Any input would be appreciated. Pros, cons, considerations, or input on the schools listed above would be great. Thanks!
 

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I have recently started taking ninjutsu or more commonly known as nija. It is awsome and from what I am told it is the only martial art to include firearms as part of the weapon system.
 

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I have taken Krav Maga on and off the past couple of years. I like it alot, but had to stop going because my instructor was a co-worker who was fired for some bad stuff.
 

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I voted other. Include the two aforementioned, but also think of supplementing others as well. I prefer a mixed martial arts repitoire.

I took TKD and Karate when I was younger. I prefer a mixed martial arts bag. BJJ is good, KM, TKD are also good. Other arts cover the gaps where others leave off. Good to have at least two of the basics known. I like TKD for strikes and use my wrestling background for ground work. I cover standing and ground work.

I know some throws and other general stuff, but don't really stick to one disipline or another.
 

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I vote for Krav Maga.

I don’t claim to know a lot about H2H fighting. I only had one year of Muy Thai experience (Too much cardiovascular work for me), along with high school wrestling.

From what I understand, Krav Maga is based on resourcefulness. That’s a big turn on for me:image035: . From what I have seen on T.V., Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is based on ground grappling. From personal experience and what I have witnessed, most H2H fighting ends up on the ground but the victor is the first person to get back on their feet. Also, wrestling in a crowded area:ahhhhh:

Like I said earlier I’m by no means an expert.
 

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I also vote for Krav Maga.

My best friend who is a 7th degree black belt says that of your two choices Krav Maga is the way to go. It is purely self-defense oriented with no "Art" involved. He says that there are many other options available, but given your choices Krav Maga is the correct answer.
 

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I choose other...

Short answer:
Cross train in as many styles as you can, don't walk into a place where you don't have a means of escape, try not to get in fights. :duh: :biggrin2:
Of the two options given I'd go with Krav.

Read below if you want the long answer...


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Okay, generally I hate these kind of polls. There is no correct answer. And it takes too many words to properly express yourself.

One thing I will say, what jujitsu I have learned always seems to find me and the other opponent wrestling around on the ground. Thats all fine and well when it happens on a mat. Seems to me most of my "real" fights were not on a mat. And just counting in my head roughly half of them involved weaponry of some sort. A couple of times it was just whatever was laying around. My first fight consisted of me ticking off another kid, then him getting mad and smacking me with an iron pipe after I turned away. He blind sided me, busted some teeth, the fight was over. That lasted all of 12 seconds.

Here is the deal, I have come to the conclusion there is no best anything in empty hand techniques. Most of them are watered down, but some of them are about the nuts and bolts of fighting. Very few are the be all, end all system. Reason being that all a goblin has to do is take you out of your element, fight you on his terms, not yours. Many times the best technique in empty hand fighting is not to fight at all. A good pair of running shoes and situational awareness.

Now with that said, of the two I would go with Krav. But regardless whatever you choose make sure you cross train, if you pick a grappling style at least learn how to strike. If you study a striking system learn to defend against catch and throws, and locks and grappling technique. Also consider your fighting style, will it work in a constricted area, and open area. What if you grapple, will you be able to use your knowledge on hard pavement covered in glass, what if the other guy has a weapon?

The best learning I ever did was many years ago. I used to work in a small shop. After work we would clear the floor and spar for a couple hours 2-3 times a week. The floor consisted of carpet and tile. Mostly grappling, but strikes were allowed. We learned pretty quick what worked and what didn't. And there were about a dozen of us, so we brought all sorts of techniques to the table. But this still wasn't full training for the real world. One day we added a "knife" to the game. That was a real clue in, one guy with a knife and even basic rudimentary skills usually wins. Then we added a gun. Amazing that. If the guy with the knife is within ten feet of the guy with the gun (and it's holstered), the gunman is generally a dead man.

I guess my point is in a street fight anything goes. It happens fast, and unless your are the bad guy you are the one getting jumped. Use a weapon. Dirt, rocks, roll of pennies. This is your life. If find yourself in an empty hand street fight you already made a mistake somewhere. You weren't properly aware of your surroundings.
 

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I love Aikido, but AHHHHH Glass- Hoppah...I am a zen mastah of the art of KLICK PAO.

Get it?
 

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Gunslinger Ninja? Wait! I saw that movie!

glocksmygun said:
I have recently started taking ninjutsu or more commonly known as nija. It is awsome and from what I am told it is the only martial art to include firearms as part of the weapon system.
When the Ninja were first formed, firearms and gunpowder didn't hold the defensive instruments possible today. The Asians have historically held firearms in low regard. Look at gun control in that area today. Given THAT, any martial art of oriental origins that today includes firearms is the brainchild of that particular instructor. IMHO.

Speaking as a history teacher, the Ninja were renowned for their offensive rather than defensive capabilities. In short, they were assassins. The classic Samurai reviled the Ninja and killed them as casually as one might slay a feral dog today. :hand1: Aikido is possibly the pure form of Samurai art.
 

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Don't fight

Risasi said:
Short answer:
Cross train in as many styles as you can, don't walk into a place where you don't have a means of escape, try not to get in fights. :duh: :biggrin2:
Try not to get into fights! That's my bottom line philosophy!

I'm a very peaceful guy. Nonconfrontational. Life is too short to be angry for whatever reason. Especially in self defense, I try not to react in anger. Anger makes you slow and stupid. Stupid will get you killed. Fighting is aggression. Anger is aggression. Aggression is stupid (in the personal scenario) unless you're special operations looking for that terrorist BG. Even then, they kill without emotion. Well, except elation for a job well done.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the input everyone. I'm pretty sure that I'm going to go with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. The facility and instructors at the school here have great credentials. They also include mixed-martial-arts classes as well that throw in techniques from western boxing, muay thai, and wrestling.
 

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I didn't vote, since I have no experience with either system. I would just say that we all need something more than just our handguns. What system you study is less important than the quality of the instructor(s) and the effort you put in.

IIRC, Clint Smith of Thunder Ranch fame is supposed to have said that a handgun is what you use to fight your way to a rifle. To expound on that, you may need your hands first in order to access your handgun.

KC

P.S. In no way do I consider myself qualified to comment on Clint Smith's pronouncements. I intended only to apply the same train of thought to another phase of conflict. I don't no nuthin about nuthin.
 

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I tell ya...if it comes down to empty hand fighting you have screwed up somewhere. However, being able to fight empty hands and having the mindset to do so is good.
 

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Jaltered - It's been a while since being, among other things, a defensive tactics instructor; we had our own specific styles mainly a hodge - Podge of Shotokan & Savate, w/ US Military hand to hand thrown in. These days; My likely answer is "KA-.45", "KA-9mm", "KA-.380, etc. Probably doesn't help exactly, but I get tired easier than I used too and you can't be the "Baddest Guy On The Block Forever..!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
erh said:
Jaltered - It's been a while since being, among other things, a defensive tactics instructor; we had our own specific styles mainly a hodge - Podge of Shotokan & Savate, w/ US Military hand to hand thrown in. These days; My likely answer is "KA-.45", "KA-9mm", "KA-.380, etc. Probably doesn't help exactly, but I get tired easier than I used too and you can't be the "Baddest Guy On The Block Forever..!
I hear ya. I study the arts of Glock-fu and Long-gun-do. :smile:

However, shooting guns isn't helping me get in better shape physically.

Getting my butt whooped in martial arts class inspires me to :weightlifter:
 

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Well said Risasi,

Also as an addendum, be aware that most fights end up on the ground. (thus the benefit of learning some Jiu-Jitsu)

Learning any martial art is acquired through repeated training and acquiring skills through sparring, various exercises for stretching, endurance, speed, balance, strength, etc....

Katas (forms) have a function, but they do not make one a fighter, only fighting does that.

Just my .02
 

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I'll take a different tack here. Of your options, I say BJJ for sure. I'd also add (if you can): Muay Thai and regular boxing.

First, whatever you take, you need to spar. Sparring is the only way to find out how you're body will react in a fight, as well as what is more likely to work. You will spar in BJJ, boxing and MT. I took a couple Krav classes and, I gotta say, it seems they're leaving out the real stuff. No sparring, and the overall atmosphere seemed more like step aerobics than a fighting system (playing loud music, and go through routines but don't really strike each other). I am sure that the Krav they teach to commandos in Israel works, but I'm also pretty sure they don't teach that in Krav dojos here.

I took regular karate for 2 years and it taught good basic punching and kicking, which I used when I recently started taking a mixed martial art fighting system (which incorporates several systems like -- you guessed it -- boxing, Muay Thai, BJJ and Krav).
 

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Just make sure your instructor isn't a whack job (for some reason, the martial arts seem to attract them more than most pastimes). Observe a class, watch the body language and voice of the instructor and the reactions of the students, & pay attention to your instincts.

It always seems to me to be the biggest hurdle when looking for a new school.
 
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