Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I've been reading up on Bug out bags and basic vehicle emergency kits and first aid kits. I want to start getting these put together and have come up with a list of items I think I should include. Please give me your input on things I may be forgetting, or things that I should leave out b/c they are not essential. I dont plan on needing these bags, however just like a firearm, I want one available if I ever do need it.

Bug Out Bag
Entrenching Tool (Mil Spec)
Leatherman / Multitool
Knife
Paracord
duct tape
MRE's
Water
Water purification
Thermal Blanket
Lighter fluid
"water proof" matches


Vehical Emergency Kit
Flares
Reflective triangle
Jumper Cables
Thermal Blanket
Oil

First Aid Kit
Gauze
Tape
Asprin
Ace Bandage
Antiseptic
Sterile Wipes
Tweezers
Scissors
Anti-Burn cream
Anti-Diarrhea meds
Turnicate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
Gloves, gloves, and gloves.

Mechanix Gloves on your main bag (hung on not in)
Leatherwork gloves in your bag
Lots of rubber gloves for practicing universal precautions.

Zip ties
Headlamp
Flashlight
Large towel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
somethings I've thought of since posting:

Spare Batteries
A few changes of cloths (underwear, socks, pants, shirts)
Marker / Pen / Notebook
Gloves (work / disposable)
Radio
toothbrush/toothpaste/deodorant/etc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mechanix gloves I didn't think of because I always have a pair of M-Pact Covert gloves on me (hands or back pocket). I probably should consider a 2nd set for my B.O.B though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
I would definitly leave the toothpaste and deoderant out. Smelling nice goes out the window any time a Bug out bag is needed. Definitly not a necessity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
BigStick-
I can somewhat agree with the deodorant, but disagree on the toothpaste. Dental hygiene is a critical factor in combat readiness. When a guys goes down from an abscess or a cavity, it kills your mission capability. Failure to maintain dental health can actually kill you. Poor dental hygiene is one of the "stealth" causes of heart disease. I'm not a doctor, but I do have to keep my platoon at full strength, if at all possible. In a long-term survival situation there are obviously alternatives to OTC toothpaste, but I wouldn't recommend ignoring the issue.

Bfunk-
This is a rough framework you might work from, though there are hundreds of lists available online. Check backpacking and survival sites (e.g. SurvivalBlog.com) and then adapt to meet your own needs. Backpacker magazine is

Mini kit (fits in a Camelback M.U.L.E. or comparable pack)
-Folding Lock-back knife
-Compass
-Matches/Lighter
-Tinder
-Flashlight
-First Aid Kit
-Space Blanket/Survival Bag
-Water Purification Tablets
-Water bottle/Canteen
-Canteen Cup (aluminum) (canteen & cup in a molle pouch attached to the pack, comes in handy for purifying water when your 3L hydration bladder runs out)
-Duct tape (folded flat)
-100 ft 550-Cord
-Fishing line, hooks, sinkers
-Scalpel/razor blade
-Fleece cap
-Ultra-thin Neoprene glove liners
-Work gloves
-Compact waterproof jacket (folds into itself and zips shut)
-Sunscreen, chapstick & bug repellent
-Couple of powerbars
-Can of dip (what can I say? It's important to me!)

The M.U.L.E. then can fit inside a larger ruck I have that has two sets of clothes (base layer, casual, insulating, and shielding) 5 pairs of socks, and some other tools and things I consider essential.

Vehicle Kit (not counting mechanic tools or fluids)- Preferably in a 4x4 vehicle
-3-10 gallons of water (2x 5gal jerry can is great!) or a couple cases of 3x 1gal
-Case of MREs
-5x8' Camo tarp
-Sleeping bag(s)
-Compact tent
-Bundle firewood/charcoal & fluid (cheap and easier than chopping it your first night stranded in the rain and cold)
-E-tool
-Hatchet
-Extra cigs/dip (as applicable, 'cause when you need it, you REALLY need it! LOL)
-Short handle full-size spade shovel (summer), short-handle "coal" shovel (winter)

In the truck I also have a full complement of mechanic tools (which I mostly know how to use, BTW :D), spare parts, and most of the necessary tools and patching gear (always adding to it!) to keep the truck on the road, short of a catastrophic engine or drive-train failure.

And honestly, I have a good number of other bags and kits in various states of readiness and deployability that I need to sift through and refine.

There's another post on this by ScubaDuba, really has it locked on. As a Ranger should.

Keep in mind, that you should always layer your security, both on a physical perimeter level and a personal gear level. Just as you layer your clothes, you can layer your kits. They should be compatible and supplementary while not being overly redundant. You should be able to ditch your vehicle and survive, and then if worst comes to worst, ditch your pack, and still survive with a small pouch or what's in your vest & pockets.

Semper Fi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
I would definitly leave the toothpaste and deoderant out. Smelling nice goes out the window any time a Bug out bag is needed. Definitly not a necessity.
This is why I don't believe in Bug Out Bags and instead roll with the Bag of Evil. I carry things I need based on experience with plenty of room to add stuff. Brushing your teeth can make you feel a little bit human during a bad time.- George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
This is the BEST forum for Concealed Carry & a great community of helpful people.

The best site I've found for survival & Bugging Out (or Bugging in) is NearDeathExperiments.Com Check it out- there is whole section for bug out bags.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Nope

I would definitly leave the toothpaste and deoderant out. Smelling nice goes out the window any time a Bug out bag is needed. Definitly not a necessity.
Please allow me to disagree.

I work as an emergency manager and have a few disasters under my belt.

Leaving personal hygiene items OUT of a bug-out kit is going to lead to discomfort that will lead to misery that will lead to the warrior becoming a casualty. What do we send to troops overseas in the Care Packages?

I want a way to shave, to brush my teeth, comb my hair, and a shower once in a while. Even a hot shower in a cold dark house made my misery bearable in a prolonged winter storm that left 80% if my County dark for days.

Look at the Preparedness Calendar at Altus Emergency Management in the links section at the bottom of the page. Using this calendar, in 26 weeks, you have a kit. Keep using it to replenish what you put in the kit. That way it always stays fresh. Don't forget medications, glasses, hearing aides, etc.

There's a blog called Prepared Society that discusses just this issue. I post there as well. I don't own it. If you can tolerate the few "tin foil hats" there, it's a good place to pick up some other ideas.

While on the topic of personal responsibility for preparedness, please remember YOU prepare for YOU and those with you, including pets, if you care about them. I'd like to NOT hear in my headset YOU say, "I can't leave my animals to go to a shelter to get a meal". Yes, I have heard those words, more than once.

Thanks for letting me share my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
Please allow me to disagree.

I work as an emergency manager and have a few disasters under my belt.

Leaving personal hygiene items OUT of a bug-out kit is going to lead to discomfort that will lead to misery that will lead to the warrior becoming a casualty. What do we send to troops overseas in the Care Packages?

I want a way to shave, to brush my teeth, comb my hair, and a shower once in a while. Even a hot shower in a cold dark house made my misery bearable in a prolonged winter storm that left 80% if my County dark for days.

Look at the Preparedness Calendar at Altus Emergency Management in the links section at the bottom of the page. Using this calendar, in 26 weeks, you have a kit. Keep using it to replenish what you put in the kit. That way it always stays fresh. Don't forget medications, glasses, hearing aides, etc.

There's a blog called Prepared Society that discusses just this issue. I post there as well. I don't own it. If you can tolerate the few "tin foil hats" there, it's a good place to pick up some other ideas.

While on the topic of personal responsibility for preparedness, please remember YOU prepare for YOU and those with you, including pets, if you care about them. I'd like to NOT hear in my headset YOU say, "I can't leave my animals to go to a shelter to get a meal". Yes, I have heard those words, more than once.

Thanks for letting me share my experience.
From another emergency management professional, I concur. Litle things often do make the biggest difference.
And a double ditto on the pet preparedness. Keep food, blankets and cages handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
I actually agree with you guys that hygene is important, and I can understand how toothpaste can prevent major problems. I was just thinking along the lines for a BOB specifically in the car as something to grab to get you back to your home/base where you can more fully equip yourself and prepare for the long term after a major event. I think those things are important, just not in a BOB. Possibly we just view the BOB differently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Maybe I'm not using the term B.O.B correctly. This will not be a "in-car speciffic" bag. This will be something that will be in the trunk while i'm away from home, and at home when I am there. Not only would it be used in case I need to survive while trying to get home, but also if I would need to survive while leaving home.

Thank you all for your input, I will check out the sites that you have mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
one more question. in a pack such as the M.U.L.E that has a bladder, should I store it with water inside, or hope that when I need it water will be accessable. Or should I buy some Emergecy Drinking Water Packets that have shelf lifes similar to that of MRE's?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Let me just say that Bug Out Bags may not necessarily contain all items you want in an emergency. The Bug Out bag in my opinion is for getting to a safe location. It is not necessarily your entire emergency kit. I carry the essentials like a trauma kit, respirator, light, ammo, knife, gun, etc. in a backpack when I go to work. I leave all the rest of my emergency equipment in the truck. That way if I can't get to my truck right away I have the essentials on me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
Want a real world BOB? For a step by step blog that is filled with TONS of useful information by someone who's been through it:
Listening to Katrina
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,781 Posts
The mistake many make is they try to take just about everything from home in the famous (this will protect me) B.O.B. A friend in Florida told me of a group from one of his forums routinely hike with their 80-pound packs. I'd be afraid I would die of a heart attack lugging an 80-pound pack while escaping to safety! As Jensen so aptly stated, it's to get you to a safe location - not become your new residence. Have what you need including water, food and something for shelter with you as you may not be able to get to your destination immediately. My pack weighs 30# and will lighten with each water break.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,296 Posts
For the bug out bag, I'd add a light-weight sleeping bag (rated for Zero degrees), a light weight pup tent (or tarp for shelter).

Also, I laminated important documents (birth certs, titles, etc).

I figure that if I have to bug out, it's because my house is destroyed and I'm never going back. So, I also added some family pictures to my bug out bag.

And, most important of all, my Bible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Just like the "caliber wars", "which ONE gun would you have?" and "which are better, real or fake?" arguments that will never ever be fully agreed upon in a forum, this one will not also. I think everyone needs to assess their own capabilities and experience. Some can (like mentioned) "roll out of bed" and deal with whatever comes along. Others may need more stuff ready to go and less improvising.

With that said, I'll add my 2 cents in here... A few friends and I are currently going through this BOB excercise. Everyone's is different. However, we also broke it down into"

1. Get Home Bag. This is designed to get you safely home from wherever you are to your "safe spot". It is not designed for more than 1, maybe 2 days of use. This can be a backpack you either carry with you daily or just sit in your car.

2. Bug Out Bag. This is for the longer term. More stuff, more food, better medical kit, more stuff for the whole family (not just you), etc.

3. Vehicle Only Bags. Maybe not for "bugging out" but a emergency bag in case you are stuck in the boonies, snowstorm, whatever in your car. Will probably have more things like tools, wire, fuses, etc.

4. Remember, your CAR is also a bug-out-bag-on-wheels. You may not be able to get to it (perhaps), but it can at least haul bigger things like bigger wool blankets, jugs of water, ammo, etc.

Man, these things are fun to make! I guess this is the "guy" version of scrapbooking.

Emrah
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I wont lie, I am a nerd I love "B.O.B" talk. However I dont really have a B.O.B , its more of a GHB or Bag of Evil. Its not a whole lot but
like others have said. Use what works for you and eventually you will get the right mixture of gear. Good luck.

A flashlight would be great.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top