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There is a forum I've run across that speaks specifically to this subject plus a lot more-Everyday Carry Forum. (Hope its ok to mention other forums on this one!)
 

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Might be nice, Im actually getting a piece of kit for one of mine.
Think about a Strike Force Ultimate Survival Technologies.
Rough Use Knife from Cheapthandirt.com
Sawvivor, I forget who makes it.
 

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I think water purification would be a good thing. The list can go on and on though. I have been getting things little by little also.
It will be a fun process for you. Everyone is diffferent and what might work for the ther guys might not work for you.

I have extra ammo and mags:smile:, water treatment, fire starting gear, first aid, cash, etc. The list goes on and I dont want to bore anyone.
 

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Don't need a BOB to store extra water, food, and first-aid supplies, and those are things you could take with you...wherever you're going...:blink::rolleyes::22a:
Short of a nuke, chem, or bio...I'm sticking home where I know what and who is around me.
 

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Good Point. Sometimes like in CA there may be a Forrest Fire or Natural Disaster. Might have to leave town for a while or maybe volunteer to help out etc.
 

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Well, survival is a very personal thing. In that, I mean what exactly is your life, safety and security worth to you? Survival kit/BOB kit items, if you truly value your life, are items you don't want to skimp on or get on the cheap. Yes, value shopping is essential to get quality items at the best possible price. Trust me, the prices of the exact same item by the same manufacturer varies widely from place to place.

You definitely want equipment that is high quality, rugged, tested and proven to work or not break when used in the field. When your world has been rocked, your life is in chaos, and you are thrust into an emergency situation, is not the time to realize that items you bought to stake your life on is a bunch of crap.

The survival industry is huge! I mean really huge, and there are a lot of charlatan's out there selling junk. I will caution you that unless you've had professional survival training and/or an experienced wilderness camper it is very easy to acquire survival equipment which can and will let you down when you need it most.

So, what is the average person who is causally thinking, I need a Bug Out Bag or some Survival Equipment to do?

Well, the first thing I would do is figure out if I'm just playing around or am I serious about my survival! Just what exactly is your life worth to you? Is your wife and children staking their lives on YOU to have all the answers?

Am I just going to go out and buy some commercially put together 72 hr. "Survival Kit" filled with one or two decent items and the rest of it filled with flimsy junk for $200 and feel that's all I need. Do all I need is just some false sense of security or do I need something that will really do what it says it will?

After attending SERE school in the Marine Corps, as well as attending over 60 hours of wilderness survival training from one of the best survival instructors in the country, I've learned that the best thing to do is to custom build your own personal survival kit and/or BOB.

Truly, 80% of Survival is having a Positive Mental Attitude! Without that, you're doomed. That leaves us with a balance of 10% proper survival equipment, and 10% knowledge on how to use that equipment and the skills you possess.

What you need to understand is that if your equipment is only 10% of "Survival Equation" then the equipment you have needs to be the absolute best equipment you can afford to buy or make yourself. It must be proven to work in a true survival situation and not fail or let you down when the chips are down.

Research is the key to all this. If you haven't had any professional survival training, or are not an experienced wilderness adventurer, it just doesn't come to you through osmosis. You can't buy a "survival manual" lay it under your pillow at night and wake up in the morning and all of a sudden you know all there is to know about surviving. The best thing to do is take a survival course. And there, like all the equipment manufacturers, you have to enroll in a class, that is worth the money you spend. A reputable class taught by reputable people.

The internet is a vast wealth of information. Do the proper research, log on to forums and make sure the equipment you buy is something which will be useful, will not fail you in your hour of need, and something you've gotten for the best price you could find it at.

Then, get out and learn how to use it when it arrives. What good is having a flint and steel if you don't how to use it to build a fire when you are in stage II hypothermia, it's raining and you just used up all your "commercially manufatured" tinder that came with your flint & steel. Or that $30 "Rambo" survival knife (with the hollow handle which holds a needle and suture material) breaks and you're standing there holding just the handle when trying to split a piece of wood for your fire.

Well, sometimes your 80% positive mental attitude and "will to survive" might get you through it, but when you're fighting hypothermia, you're exhausted and scared, and that 10% equipment fails you, you may not live to see the sun rise.

Also, to address your original post... If you're wanting to get items for your "kit" as presents from other people... Either give them a specific list with specific items with the brand name of the product and where to get it, or purchase the stuff yourself! Do you really want to trust your life to judgment of someone else who may not know exactly what you need or want?

Good luck!
 

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Whatever you put in your BOB, don't forget the toilet paper!!! You will be glad you remembered!!!:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 

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Yes, there are tons of stuff you can get...besides edcforums for ideas on bags, gear and supplies you might find countycomm interesting for some of the gear...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
....lAlso, to address your original post... If you're wanting to get items for your "kit" as presents from other people... Either give them a specific list with specific items with the brand name of the product and where to get it, or purchase the stuff yourself! Do you really want to trust your life to judgment of someone else who may not know exactly what you need or want?

Good luck!
Thank you Bark'n points well taken!
 

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I would list dependable transportation, several full gas cans, a first aid kit, and some cash. If I am staying put I pretty much have what I need. If I am leaving, I can pretty much buy what I need at my destination. The link is to an article that states that in the United States no one is more than 145 miles by car (107 miles as the crow flies) from a McDonalds:

Farthest Distance From a McDonald's: 107 Miles | The Big Money

Not my first choice but it serves to illustrate the point. Travel fast, travel light, and be flexible.
 

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I would list dependable transportation, several full gas cans, a first aid kit, and some cash. If I am staying put I pretty much have what I need. If I am leaving, I can pretty much buy what I need at my destination. The link is to an article that states that in the United States no one is more than 145 miles by car (107 miles as the crow flies) from a McDonalds:

Farthest Distance From a McDonald's: 107 Miles | The Big Money

Not my first choice but it serves to illustrate the point. Travel fast, travel light, and be flexible.
CASH, gas, and clean water.

In situations where you have to bug out fast, cash is king, gas is essential (be sure to have stablizer in it if you are storing it), and clean drinking water. Those are three items that are hard to come by when the feces hits the fan.

After that, your selection is mostly personal, as recommended by my Devil Dog brother, Bark'N
 

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Ok, in my BOB:

- change of clothes
- walking shoes/boots
- bug spray, sunscreen, and sunglasses
- TP
- emergency radio
- road flares
- several ways to make fire
- flashlights
- kindling
- 3 days worth of food
- water and a filter
- a few extra rounds for my CCW
- small tent
- space blanket
- knives and multi-tool
- maps and compass
- emergency contact info
- cash
- rain gear
- deodorant and hand sanitizer
- small first-aid kit (w/ dust masks, pain meds, etc.)
- large trash bags
- reading material and playing cards

The idea here is that you might have to walk somewhere in a really tough situation. Buy this stuff at Wal-mart and skip the prefab kits, unless you think they really are worth it. You can, and probably should have more stuff you keep in your vehicles (more water, extra gas) but this is a walking kit. If you haven't listened to The Survival Podcast, its worth a shot. His episodes on Bug-out and vehicle kits are pretty good.

Mel
 

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+1 on remembering toilet paper.... And I would like to point out that where you live and the time of year is going to have a huge impact. You wouldn't catch me with sunscreen for instance, but some one in Arizona would find it to be a necessity. During the winter I wouldnt worry to much about bug dope, but during the summer you would need it here to give the mosquitos something to season their meal.

I have my main BOB stored in my garage, it includes lots of canned foods, bottled water, extra parts for the 4WD vehicle we own, first aid gear, extra blankets, coleman fuel for our stove and space heater and some extra ammo for the hunting rifle, shotgun and my handguns.

I have been a little lacking in keeping my portable BOB put together the way I should - I raided it for some stuff to go hunting this year, I guess I will be fixing that now.
 
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